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H. B. Ward, a prosperous farmer and lumberman of Wards Station, was born April 26, 1844, in Milan, Ohio; a son of Elam and Christianna (Byard) Ward. The father was born in Connecticut, in December, 1806, and moved to Ohio in 1809 with his parents. His father was Col. Jared Ward, a native of England and a gallant officer of the war of 1812. Mrs. Christianna B. Ward was a native of New York State, of Scotch descent. Our subject was raised on a farm near the place of his birth, and received a good academic education. At the age of eighteen he enlisted in the Federal Army, Company C, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Ohio Infantry, Ohio National Guards. He was honorably discharged December 15, 1864, and has now the discharge paper, issued at Washington, D.C., bearing Abraham Lincoln's signature. Our subject then joined the One Hundred and Seventy-seventh Ohio Infantry Company and served until the close of the war. He returned home, where for two years he engaged in farming, On account of feeble health he immigrated to White County, where he introduced and operated, for a short while the first saw-mill in the county. Since that time he has been almost exclusively in the farming and lumber business. He is an energetic able business man and good citizen; by industry and careful management he is now in very comfortable circumstances. He is a member of the K.of H., I.O.O.F., and is a Republican. April 7, 1870, he married Sallie, daughter of Wm. and Betsy Anderson. She was the mother of two children: Norman A. and Bessie. Her death occurred February 24, 1879. She was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. November 9, 1880, our subject wedded Ella M., daughter of James and Margaret Davis, native of Connecticut, where Mrs. Ward was born February 19, 1855. This union has resulted in the birth of three children: Sallie M., Annie Pearl and Maggie C. Mr. and Mrs. Ward are earnest members of the Missionary Baptist Church.


E. Winstead, a prominent farmer of the Fifth District, was born November 17, 1822, in Hawkins County, Tenn., the fifth child of Ephraim and Margaret (Martin) Winstead. They were of Irish-Welsh descent. The father was a farmer and stock raiser. He was a Whig, and his death occurred in Hawkins County October 27, 1832. The mother was an excellent Christian woman, a member of the Baptist Church. She died October 24, 1872. The subject of our sketch was raised on the farm. His educational advantages were very limited. At the age of fourteen he took charge of his mother's affairs, and managed them with success. After attaining his majority he went to farming on his own resources. In 1859 he located in White County. In 1865 he was appointed magistrate, but did not serve. He has been a school director for nearly thirty years. He is a stanch Democrat, and a highly respected, valuable citizen. May 28, 1848, he married Emeline, daughter of David S. and Mary (Mitchael) Rogers, of Hawkins County. This union resulted in the birth of five children. J. W., born January 27, 1850; Nancy J., born September 28, 1851; W. W., born March 17, 1854; Serener E., born July 27, 1856, and Mary M., born November 10, 1858. Each received a good education. Mr. and Mrs. Winstead are earnest and respected members of the Baptist Church.


Oliver F. Young, a prominent merchant and farmer of Simpson's mills, was born January 4, 1825, in Jackson County, Tenn., a son of James and Elizabeth (Draper) Young. The father was born in North Carolina about 1787, and immigrated to Tennessee in 1797 with his parents, John and Sarah Young. John Young, when six years of age, was captured by the Indians, and retained by them until he reached his majority, at which time a treaty was made between the whites and Indians, and prisoners exchanged. He was thus restored to his friend, his parents having been massacred at the time of his capture. James (subject's father) located in Sumner County, and lived for a number of years in the only settlement of the western portion of the State. He afterward moved to Jackson County, where he died in 1860. He was sheriff of the county for fourteen years, and a member of the Legislature two terms -- the first at Murfreesboro and the last at Nashville. His wife was born in 1787, and died in 1872. She was a daughter of Thomas Draper, one of the early pioneers of Tennessee. Our subject was reared on a farm, receiving the education of the average country boy of that day; he engaged in the merchandise business at Bagdad, Smith County, until 1852, when he moved to Hickman, Ky., continuing in the same business. In 1859 he went to New Orleans, where he was a commission merchant until 1862, when he suspended business until after the restoration of peace in1865, when he again resumed and continued till 1869. He then moved to Paducah, Ky., and in 1870 to White County, where he has been, and still is, interested in the merchandise, farming and milling business, in which he has been very successful. He is a self-made, industrious and able man. His possessions have been amassed by his own exertions and careful management. He is a member of the Christian Church, and a Democrat. In 1848 he married Nancy E., daughter of James and Rebecca Wilson, of Monroe County, Ky. She died in January, 1855. She was the mother of four children: Hayden M., Samuel A. (who died December 11, 1858), James E. (who died June 29, 1855) and an infant. In July, 1857, our subject wedded Virgie B. Watson, who bore him six children, four of whom are still living: Bettie C. (wife of the Hon. L. D. Hill), Prof. Frank S., Sallie B. and Dr. W. B. Mrs. Young died in August, 1868. July 31, 1870, our subject was united in marriage to Mrs. Eva Metcalf, nee Simpson. Her father, Gen. John W. Simpson, took a prominent part in the war of 1812.


Charles C. Young, a well known and enterprising merchant of Sparta, was born in this town February 25, 1845. He is the son of William M. and Matilda (Wallace) Young. His parents were married December 1, 1842. Mr. Young's father was of Scotch descent and was born in Jackson County October 23, 1807, and died in White County November 13, 1862. His mother was born in White County, November 5, 1822. She is still living and a resident of Fayetteville, Tenn. The grandfather of Mr. Young came from North Carolina at an early date and settled in Jackson County, and filled the office of high sheriff of that county for fourteen years, and was then in the Legislature for two sessions. At the age of eighteen Mr. Young's father, after spending his boyhood days on the farm, went to Nashville and served apprenticeship at the tanning business three years, after which he came to White County and with his small earnings established a tannery near Sparta and continued in the business about ten years. In the meantime he married a daughter of Woodson P. White. At different times before the war he was cashier of the Sparta branch of the Bank of Tennessee, of which he was a stockholder. Mr. Young received a liberal education in his native county, and at the age of fifteen entered the mercantile business as a salesman for the firm of D. P. & J. C. Shackleford at Fayetteville, Tenn., and remained one year. In the spring of 1861 he made an effort to join the Confederate States Army but was rejected on account of his age In the fall of the same year he made the second attempt to join the army and was successful. He enlisted in the Forty-first Tennessee Regiment Infantry, and remained until the close of the war. He was twice captured, first at Fort Donelson, and kept a prisoner eight months at Camp Morton, Ind.; was exchanged at Vicksburg, and captured the second time at Franklin, Tenn., being wounded twice during the engagement, and unable to retreat with the army was sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, and remained a prisoner eight months again. He returned home in the spring of 1865, after an absence of nearly four years, and engaged in farming. Beginning in 1870 he followed tanning in Putnam County three years and then farmed three years. In 1876 be came to White County with about $1,000 cash, and established a store of general merchandise at Sparta. In 1882 he formed the partnership of Young & Dryer, doing a good business for two years. At the close of 1884 he bought out his partner and has since conducted the business alone. The firm does a business of about $20,000 a year. Besides owning and controlling the above business, Mr. Young owns three dwellings and one-half interest in the business house he now occupies. On June 19, 1872, he married Miss Nettie C. Burton, a cultured lady who was educated at the McMinnville Female College; she was born in Putnam County, May 12, 1846. To this union were born four children: Stephen H., born September 13, 1874; Mary E., born December 25, 1876; Minnie L., born December 22, 1879, and one other. Mr. Young is a Democrat, while he and his wife are members of tbe Christian Church.

 


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