Biographies From Goodspeeds 1886

History of Wayne County, Tennessee

Special thanks to Fred Murtishaw who transcribed and submitted these biographies.

[Page Coordinator's Note: Please use these biographies with caution and verify statements made therein by primary sources.]

Please click on one of the names below to go to that biography.
ACKLIN, Thomas F.
ADAMS, David R.
BARNETT, John M.
BELL, William L.
BERRY, Joseph G.
BERRY, William J.
BIFFLE, Jonathan Frank
BOYD, Frank
BOYD, George W.
BROMLEY, Capt. William L.
BROMLEY, John J.
BUCHANAN, Cicero
BURNS, Jacob B.
BURNS, Lytle
BURNS, Nathan F.
BURNS, Polk D.
CARROLL, William E.
CHOAT, George T.
CHOAT, Jackson M.
COLE, Judge John H.
COPELAND, Thomas N.
COOK, Nathaniel T.
COOK, William M.
CRAIG, Capt. Peyton T.
CREWS, Jonathan
CUNNINGHAM, Armstead H.
DAVIS, John R., Sr.
DAVIS, William C.
DICKERSON, William J.
DIXON, Columbus F.
EVINS, Thomas S.
GOBBEL, Isaac H.
GRIMES, Harold A.
GRIMES, John
HAGGARD, Robert A.
HARTWELL, Egbert T.
HASSELL, Amos T.
HELTON, Henry A.
HOLLABAUGH, Jacob
HOLLIS, James P.
HOLT, James A.
HUCKABA, Thomas J.
HUGHES, Thomas S.
HURT, William
JACKSON, David S.
JACKSON, John
LUNA, Squire Allen P.
MARTIN, Richard C.
McANALLY, James E. M.
McGEE, Leroy
McGLAMERY, Elihu D.
McLEMORE, James H.
MEREDITH, James F.
MEREDITH, Thomas
MERRIMAN, James H.
MONTAGUE, John F.
MORGAN, James L.
MORRIS, Hon. Jonathan
MORRISON, Hon. Merida
MORRISON, William D.
NICHOLS, John J.
NUTT, James A.
RASBURY, Andrew C.
RASBURY, Lott G.
RICKETTS, W. T.
ROBNETT, John
SHIELDS, James T.
SHIPMAN, Charles W.
SIMS, Abraham
SIMS, Henry Clay
SIMS, Matthew J.
SIMS, Shields
SMITH, Samuel A.
STOCKARD, John
STONE, Willis S.
STRIBLING, Christopher C.
TINNON, Carns M.
TURMAN, John
TURMAN, William
TURNBOW, Ambrose M.
WILLIAMS, Andrew
YOUNGBLOOD, Joseph
YOUNGBLOOD, Matthew

These pages posted 26 December 1997

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Thomas F. Acklin is one of the firm of Mays & Acklin, liverymen of Clifton. They established their business April 1, 1886, and keep a full and excellent line of vehicles, the best in town or county. They deal quite extensively in horses and mules, and in connection, in January, 1885, established a retail liquor store, which they have conducted with fair success up to the present time. Thomas F. Acklin is a son of Cleaburn and Martha (McCreley) Acklin. who were born in Tennessee and North Carolina respectively. Thomas F. is a native of Wayne County, born May 15, 1845, and was reared to manhood on a farm. He enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1861, and served in Company F, Forty-eighth Tennessee Infantry for over three years, and in the Twentieth Regiment of Tennessee Cavalry the remainder of the war. From the time of his return home until December, 1882, he tilled the soil, and at the latter date he came to Clifton and has since been engaged in the livery business. Previous to this he kept a hotel in Saltillo for some time. In 1871 he united his fortunes with those of Sarah M. Nunley, and two children have blessed their union: Tempie and James. Mr. Acklin is a Democrat and one of the eminent business men of Clifton. Back To Top Of Page

David R. Adams, a pioneer of Wayne County, Tenn., was born October 17, 1813, son of William and Unity Adams, who were married in their native State (South Carolina), and soon immigrated to Tennessee, where the father farmed and lived for many years. The mother died here December 9, 1832, and six years later the father moved to Missouri, where he died about 1850. He was a Whig in politics. David R. lived with his father until twenty-three years of age, when he united his fortunes with those of Eliza Woodward, a Tennessean, born in 1819, and daughter of Solomon and Elizabeth (Biven) Woodward. To them were born seven children: Martha E.(deceased), William J., Elizabeth A. (deceased), Wiley H., Unity J., George S. and John F. After his marriage Mr. Adams farmed a few years and then moved to Mississippi, but not being satisfied, remained only a few months, when he returned to Tennessee. He resided in different parts of the county until 1852, when he purchased his present farm of 113 acres. The land is in a good state of cultivation and fairly well improved. When Mr. Adams first moved to Wayne County it was very sparsely settled. He is a member of the Free-Will Baptist Church, and has has always been a Republican in politics. He is strictly temperate, and has always evaded lawsuits, never being sued or having to sue but one man in the whole course of his life.

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John M. Barnett first saw the light of day in Wayne County, Tenn., in 1834. His parents, John M. and Lovina (Poag) Barnett, were born in Georgia and South Carolina, respectively, and came to Tennessee at an early day and when quite young. The father was a farmer by occupation but also practiced medicine and preached the gospel, being a minister of the Christian Church. He was a Whig and died in Wayne County, in 1834, followed by his wife in 1864. Our subject has always resided on the farm where he was born. It consists of 164 acres of fairly improved land in a good state of cultivation, the principal productions being corn, small grain and stock. In 1859, he was united in marriage to Caroline Skillern, daughter of Anderson and Polly (Spring) Skillern Mrs. Barnett was born in 1833 and died in 1863, having borne two children Joseph B. (who died in 1861), and Sarah C. In 1865 Mr. Barnett married Lillie A. Thompson, who was born in 1842, daughter of Jackson and Mary Thompson. This wife died in 1873, leaving one child, Martha J. In 1877 MR. Barnett took for his third wife Senith Welch, daughter of James and Senith Welch. She was born in 1835, and is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject belongs to the Christian Church and is a Republican in Politics. Back To Top Of Page

William L. Bell was born in Wayne County in 1844, son of William R. and Elizabeth (Burns) Bell, who were born in North Carolina and Tennessee , respectively. The father came to Tennessee when a young man, and was a tanner by trade, and in connection with this followed farming. He was a Whig in politics and died in Wayne County in 1863. His wife died in 1844. The father was married four times, his first wife being a Miss Alexander; the second, our subject's mother; the third, Adeline Stockard, and the fourth, Jane Meredith. Our subject was reared on a farm, and at the death of his mother was cared for by by his grandmother. From fifteen until nineteen years of age he resided with an uncle. He enlisted in the Confederate service, and served until the close of the war. He was in many of the principal battles, but was never wounded. He returned home in February, 1865. Shortly after his return he married Martha C. Whitaker, daughter of James and Delphia Whitaker. She was born in Tennessee in 1840, and is the mother of six children: Conly, (deceased), Elizabeth, Samuel, William H., Whittorne and Charles (deceased). Our subject farmed two years on rented land after his marriage, and in 1868, purchased his present farm of 340 acres. He is a Democrat, and held the office of deputy sheriff three years, giving good satisfaction.

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Joseph G. Berry, a well known citizen of Clifton, Tenn., was born in Hardin County January 22, 1834, son of William and Sarah (Weatherford) Berry, who were born in Georgia and East Tennessee, respectively. The father came to Tennessee with his mother when a boy, and located and afterward married in Hardin County. He died in 1868. Joseph G. was three years of age when his parents came to Wayne County. He was raised on a farm, and in the fall of 1862 enlisted in the Sixth Tennessee Cavalry, United States Army, and was promoted to captain of Company H, and served two years. At the close of the war he engaged in Mercantile business at Waynesboro, and there remained until 1880, when he removed to Clifton, and conducted the hotel at that place very successfully for three years. Since that time he has been connected with the liquor business, farming, and also keeps a hostelry for the traveling public. In 1854 he married Elmyra J. Cypert, who became the mother of the following family: William J., Ada (widow of Isaac H. Old), and Joanna. Mr. Berry is a Republican, and has been a Mason since 1855, and also belongs to the K. of H.

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William J. Berry, retail dealer in liquors at Clifton, Tenn., is a son of Joseph G. Berry, whose sketch appears in this work. He was born in Wayne County, Tenn., February 16, 1858, and was reared and educated in the county. In 1876 he engaged in his present business in Waynesboro, and remained there till 1881, when he removed his business to Clifton. He has met success in his undertakings, and conducts a strictly first-class saloon. He keeps a fine stock of pure whiskies, wines, beer, ect. October 23, 1877, he married Lou Dora Ramsey. They have two children: Joseph C. and Ralph M. Mr. Berry is a stanch Republican, and was city recorder of Clifton two terms.

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Jonathan Frank Biffle was born in Wayne County, Tenn., in 1849, His father Jonathan Biffle, was a Tennessean, a farmer, and when a young man was deputy Sheriff of Wayne County. He served in the Ninth Tennessee Regiment in the late war, under Jake Biffle, and was captured in 1864, while at home on furlough, and taken to Rock Island, Ill., where he was retained a prisoner until his death, January 23, 1864. He left a wife and three children to mourn his loss. His widow, Eliza A. (Hardin) Biffle, married George Walker, of Tennessee, and died July 14, 1885. Our subject, after his death, resided with his mother until her second marriage, when she left, giving him possession of the home-farm. He afterward inherited a portion of this farm, and purchased the remainder, in all consisting of 350 acres of fairly improved land. His principal products are corn, small grain and peanuts. Besides this, he owns sixty-four acres of land below his present farm, and a two-thirds interest in 183 acres of timber land. In 1877 he and Mary Clendennin united their fortunes. She a Tennessean by birth, born 1858, daughter of Joseph and Bettie Clendennin. Mr. and Mrs. Biffle have four children: Joe., Jonathan A. (who died 1881) Nettie E. (who died in1883) and John W. Mr. Biffle is a Democrat.

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Frank Boyd, attorney at law, of Waynesboro, Tenn., was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, on the 30th of July, 1859, being a son of George W. and Ann E. (Songer) Boyd, who were Virginians. The father came to Wayne County, Tenn., in 1808, and located at Wayne Furnace, of which he was superintendent until the business there was suspended. Frank prepared himself for teaching and worked at intervals on the farm in this county. He taught in this and Shelby Counties until 1879. In the meantime he begun the study of law, and afterward studied under the direction of Howell E. Jackson in the winter of 1879 and spring of 1880. In September 1880, he entered the Lebanon law School, from which he graduated in 1881. In August of the same year he came to Waynesboro and engaged in practicing, continuing the same good success to the present. In November, 1885, he became identified with the drug business of the county, becoming a partner in the same with his brother, George W., at Waynesboro. Mr. Boyd is a Democrat and is a candidate for the attorney-generalship of the Ninth Judicial Circuit. May 22, 1883, he married Laura E., the daughter of A. T. Hassell. Mr. Boyd is one of the rising young lawyers of Wayne County, and a reliable and enterprising young man.

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George W. Boyd, druggist of Waynesboro, Tenn., was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, December 9, 1857, son of George W. Boyd, Sr., and came to Wayne County, Tenn., with his parents in 1868. He secured a fair education chiefly by his own efforts and afterward clerked in his fathers store. In May, 1883, he came to Waynesboro and engaged in the drug business in company with H. A. Helton. In November, 1885, his brother, Frank Boyd, took Mr. Helton's place in the firm. They keep a stock of drugs and groceries, and control a large share of the trade, in his line, in town and country. They also have the agency for the Domestic sewing machine at this place. He is a Democrat.

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Capt William L. Bromley, postmaster and early citizen of Waynesboro,Tenn, was born in Wayne County June 26, 1827, and is one of seven children born to the marriage of John Bromley and Edith Hurst, natives respectively, of Virginia and North Carolina. John Bromley, grandfather of our subject, located in Wayne County in 1818, having located in Giles County the previous year. His son John, married and reared his family in Wayne County, and followed a farmer's life, being one of the successful agriculturists of his day. He died in the Third District July 26, 1850. The mother lived until March 30, 1884, having attained her seventy-seventh year. William L. spent his early days on his father's farm, and secured but limited education in the primitive subscription schools of his day. At the age of twenty-two he began tilling the soil on his own responsibility, and continued that occupation until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in the Confederate Army, Company I, First Tennessee Cavalry. In 1862 he was chosen captain of Company F, Ninth Tennessee Battalion of cavalry, and served in this capacity until the close of the war. He resumed farming, but in 1869 engaged in the general merchandise business as clerk at Flat Woods postoffice. In February, 1876, he came to Waynesboro, where he has since been successfully engaged in the general merchandise business. The firm is composed of himself and R. C. Martin. In October, 1885, he was made postmaster of Waynesboro, and has been a competent and highly satisfactory office-holder. The captain is an unswerving Democrat in politics, and is a Royal Arch Mason.

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John J. Bromley's birth occurred in Tennessee in 1838, son of John and E. Bromley, who were born in Virginia and North Carolina, respectively, and came to Tennessee at an early day. The father was a farmer, and served for several years as deputy sheriff. He was a stanch Democrat and died in 1846, his widow's death occurring in 1881. John J.'s early days were spent on his father's farm. At the age of twenty-two years he began the battle of life for himself, and lived on a farm owned by his father until 1857, when he purchased a portion of this farm, and continued buying out the heirs until he now owns all but one share; 1,200 acres constitute his farm, which is in a good state of cultivation. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate Army and served throughout the war. He returned home in the spring of 1865. He is a Democrat in politics. In 1861 he wedded Mary Belsha, daughter of Ewing and Darky (Bromley) Belsha. She was born in Alabama in 1839, and is the mother of six children: William E., Eda C., James A., John L., Richard C., and Thomas C. Mrs. Bromley died July 5, 1875, and September 10, of the same year, he married Sallie Terry, and six children have blessed their union: Charles J., Samuel B. (who died 1883), Joseph C., Amos H., Mary J., and Emma N.

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Cicero Buchanan, M. D., county superintendent of public schools of Wayne County, Tenn., was born in Giles County, Tenn., April 20, 1842, and is a son of Samuel G and Sarah E. Buchanan, who were born and reared in Tennessee. Dr. Buchanan was educated at State Springs Academy in Giles County, and his boyhood days were spent on his father's farm. At the breaking out of the late civil war he, in 1861, enlisted in the Third Tennessee Regiment, serving until the close of the war and participating in many of the hardest-fought battles. After Lee's surrender he returned to his home and began the study of medicine under Dr. A. H. Berry, of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., and in 1867 entered the medical department of the University of Nashville, attending one course of lectures. In the fall of 1868 he graduated as an M. D. from the Atlanta (Ga.) Medical College, and in February, 1869, located at Waynesboro, and has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. He is regarded as a well-read and reliable physician by his patrons and brother physicians, and has been prosperous both professionally and financially. The Doctor owns about 1,500 acres of land, about 200 acres of which is in a fair state of cultivation. In 1871 Amos and Mary A. Hassell's daughter, Ella A., became his wife. Dr. Buchanan has taken an active part in educational affairs of late years, and in 1882 was elected to the office of county superintendent, and still holds the position. He is one of the Wayne County health officers, is a Democrat and belongs to the F. & A. M.

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Jacob B. Burns, one of Wayne County's pioneers, is a son of Samuel L. and Sarah A. Burns, and was born in 1832. His parents were Tennesseans and farmers; the father being an extensive stock raiser, in which business he became quite wealthy. he was sheriff of Wayne County two terms. He died on his farm on Buffalo River (which he purchased in 1837) in 1880. His wife died in 1877. His father, William Burns, was the first man to represent Wayne County in the State Legislature. Pattie E. Johnston became our subjects wife in 1861; she was born in 1843, daughter of John C. Johnston, and became the mother of the following interesting family. Sarah A., Mattie V., Elizabeth J., Mary L., Anna L., Edna (who died in 1876), Lillie J., Carrie K., Lela K., (who died in 1883), Florence B., Willie, Myrtle R, and two infants deceased. At the age of twenty-three our subject began doing for himself on the farm where he now lives, which was given him by his father. It consists of 500 acres, 300 acres of which are in a good state of cultivation. He raises corn, small grain and cotton and has recently paid considerable attention to stock raising. In 1867 he, in partnership with J. A. Clendennin, opened a mercantile house in the village of Ashland; but at the end of ten years our subject sold out and engaged in the same business on his farm, continuing about five years. His mercantile life did not prove successful, although he is a man of good business qualifications. He joined the Confederate Army in 1862 and served until 1863, when he was discharged on account of disability. After remaining at home about one year he re-entered the service, remaining about six months, when he again became disabled and did not again enlist. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and is a Democrat. His wife belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

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Polk D. Burns was born in 1844, in Tennessee. His father, Samuel L. Burns, was a farmer and stock raiser, and lived the greater part of his life in Wayne County, Tenn. He married Sarah A. Baker, and both were born in 1814. They married in 1830, and became the parents of thirteen children, seven of whom are yet living. The father died June 20, 1880, and his widow February 24, 1874. Our subject was married in 1871 to Sallie Kelley, who was born in Tennessee in 1847, and is the daughter of Riley and Sallie Kelley. Mr. and Mrs. Burns became the parents of nine children: Lou E., Sam (died in 1881), Riley K., Thomas T., Bill B., Biffle F., Jennie P. and two infants (deceased) unnamed. Our subjects early days were spent on a farm, and at the age of twenty-six he began doing for himself. He opened a mercantile store in Flatwood in 1868, but at the end of one year sold out and resumed farming. In 1880 he purchased his present farm of 1,000 acres, on which he raises corn and stock. He also owns interest in 300 acres of land near Ashland, in this county. He served in the Confederate Army in the late war, enlisting in 1862. He served until the close of the war, and surrendered at Jonesboro, in May, 1865. He was not wounded nor taken prisoner during his entire service. He was a Mason, and a stanch Democrat in politics, and one of the worthy citizens of the county.

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Nathan F. Burns, farmer and native of Wayne County, Tenn., was born August 1, 1856, son of Samuel L. and Sarah A. (Baker) Burns (see sketch of P. D. Burns). From birth he was raised to a farmer's life and now resides on and owns the old homestead. His is the best farm in the county, having been kept in good repair and well taken care of by the father, who was an industrious, enterprising and prosperous farmer. The farm contains 1,375 acres of land and lies on Buffalo River. The products are corn, small grain and stock, the latter receiving Mr. Burns' chief attention. He is a stanch Democrat, and November 7, 1875, he wedded Sallie A. Harbour, daughter of James G. and Esther J. (Lacefield) Harbour. Mrs.Burns was born in Tennessee August 20, 1854, and is the mother of three children: Nathan F.,Jr., James S., Jr., and Miles G. Mr. and Mrs. Burns are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he may truly be be said to be one of the first and best citizens Wayne County can boast of.

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Lytle Burns, a wealthy farmer residing in the Fourth District of Wayne County, was born where he now resides May 13, 1858, and is a son of John S. and Rebecca Burns, who were Tennesseans by birth. Lytle is the youngest of their family of eight children, and was reared on the farm and received a liberal education at Waynesboro and Clifton. He has been engaged in agricultural pursuits from boyhood, and has prospered beyond his expectations. Owing to energy and perseverance he is the owner of 1,066 acres of land, about 120 acres of which are well cultivated. In 1880 he was united in marriage to Ida Rankin, daughter of James C. M. and Bettie Rankin, of Wayne County, and their union has been blessed in the birth of four children - two sons and two daughters: James R., Essie M., Margaret E. and an infant son. The family are members of the Primitive Baptist Church, and in politics our subject is a Democrat in politics, and is of Scotch-Irish descent.

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William E. Carroll was born in North Carolina in 1827, son of James R. and Mary P. (Hubbard) Carroll. The parents, who were natives of North Carolina, came to Tennessee about 1836, and settled in Marshall County. After residing in different counties they finally settled in Henderson County, where the father died in 1868, and the mother in 1883. After attaining his majority our subject began doing for himself. In 1849 he married Anna Scott, daughter of John M. and Anna Scott. She was born in Wayne County, Tenn., in 1828, and is the mother of eight children: Mary E., born April 2, 1850; William A., born January 25, 1852 and died August 2, 1871; James R., born December 2, 1853; Sarah J., born February 2, 1859; John M., born September 27, 1861; Thomas H., born February 4, 1864; Laura A., born May 14, 1870, and Albert N., born April 8, 1874. Since 1851 Mr. Carroll has lived in Wayne County, and has resided on his present farm of 275 acres since 1866. He purchased it from minor heirs and, owing to the neglect of the administrator to comply with the requirements of law, was compelled to pay for it the second time. He directs his attention to raising corn, small grain and stock, and has accumulated some property by his energy and good management. He and Mrs. Carroll are members of the Christian Church, and in politics he was a democrat up to the Rebellion, but since that time been a Republican.

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Jackson M. Choat is a native of the State born in 1847, son of Simpson and Sarah Choat, who were also born in Tennessee. The father was a tiller of the soil, and a Democrat in politics. He was prosperous and honorable citizen, and lived in Wayne County up to the time of his death. which occurred about 1858. His wife died in 1873. Jackson M. Choat resided with his parents until their respective deaths. He and his brother then purchased the home place in partnership. It contains about 700 acres of land, fairly improved, and lies on Buffalo River. he gives his attention to raising corn and peanuts. Mr. Choat is a good neighbor and a worthy citizen, a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a stanch Democrat in politics. In 1879 he married Virgie Hollabaugh, and by her is the father of of one child - Isham J. Mrs. Choat is a daughter of Jacob and Rose Hollabaugh, and was born in Tennessee in 1863.

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George T. Choat is a Wayne County Tennessean, and was born in 1845, son of Simpson and Sarah (Burns) Choat. (See sketch of Jackson M. Choat.) George T. resided with his widowed mother after his fathers death, and in 1868 was united in marriage to Margaret E. Graves, daughter of John H. and Sallie Graves. Mrs. Choat was born in Tennessee in 1847, and is the mother of seven children: Henrietta V., William S., Arthur T., Sallie L., May L., V. B. and P. B. In 1864 Mr. Choat enlisted in the Confederate service, serving until the close of the war. he surrendered at Charlotte, N. C., in May, 1865. In 1871 he located on the farm, and purchased it in 1881. It lies on Buffalo River and contains 260 acres of land, 180 acres of which are in good state of cultivation. Mr. Choat has lived an honorable life, and is one of the worthy and influential citizens of the county. In politics he is a stanch Democrat. His grandfather, Arthur Choat, was a pioneer citizen of Wayne County, having located on Buffalo River when the county was covered with canebrake.

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Judge John H. Cole, chairman of Wayne County Court and native of the county, was born May 17, 1834, son of Bennett and Nancy (Kirwin) Cole, both of whom were born in North Carolina. The father married in his native State and came to Wayne County, Tenn., in 1825, and followed farming and stock raising until his death in 1857. John H.'s boyhood days were spent on his father's farm, and in acquiring such education as could be obtained in the old-fashioned schools of his day. In December, 1860, he married Nancy A. Linn, and engaged in agricultural pursuits. At the breaking out of hostilities between North and South, he suspended work for a time, and in December, 1863, enlisted as a private in Company C, Second Tennessee Federal Mounted Infantry, and served with his regiment in Middle Tennessee until Lee's surrender. He returned home and resumed farming, and that same year was elected clerk of the county court and served by re-election until 1878, with the exception of one term (1869-70) During 1879-80he served the county in the capacity of superintendent of public schools. He farmed during that time and has continued the same up to the present. In 1881 he was elected magistrate of the Fourth District, and held the position by re-election until January, 1886, when he was elected to his present position of chairman of the county court. Judges Cole's married life has been blessed with twelve children, but four now living: Viola A. (Mrs J. C. Taylor), Jasper E., Martha V. and Mary F. The Judge is an uncompromising Democrat in politics, although he was a Whig prior to the war. He is a Mason, Royal Arch degree, and a member of the K. of H. He is an adherent of the Christian Church, and is one of Wayne County's competent and just officials.

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Thomas N. Copeland, merchant of Clifton, Tenn., and native of Wayne County, first saw light of day June 29, 1853. He was reared on a farm with his parents, securing a fair education in the common branches. In March, 1881, he left the paternal roof and came to Clifton and engaged in the mercantile business, in which he has continued to the present time, meeting with the success his energy and honesty merited. He keeps a fine stock of general dry goods, besides hats, boots and shoes and gents' furnishing goods. He has a large and lucrative trade, and is one of the leading business men of Clifton. In 1874 he married Florence Ferguson, of Maury County, Tenn., who died November 27, 1885, leaving three children: Mildred Camilla, Osceolla and Lorenzo. Mr. Copeland is a stanch Republican in his political views, and is a member of the K. of H., and the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His parents, Joseph M. and Sarah W. (Cypert) Copeland, are natives and residents of the county.

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Nathaniel T. Cook, M. D., of Wayne County, was born in 1850, and is a son of John L. and Mary A. (Johnson) Cook, who were natives of this State, the father being a farmer by occupation. He served in the quartermaster's department of the Confederate Army, enlisting in 1863 and serving until the close of the war. He was a Democrat and died in Wayne County in 1876. Our subject assisted his parents until he attained his majority, when he began the battle of life for himself and engaged in the grocery and livery business in the town of Clifton. About eighteen months later there was a decline in stock and he at once closed out his business and in partnership with his uncle, N. W. Johnson, purchased a two-thirds interest in the dry goods establishment of Dr. Selph, and shortly after purchased the Doctor's interest. In 1876 our subject sold out and retired to his father's farm, which he managed three years. He and his brother then erected a steam saw-mill on the latter's farm. He gave this up in 1883 and began practicing medicine, having spent a great deal of time studying that science, and became a partner with his brother, James T. Cook, M. D., of Flatwood, and they are doing a good work. he is a member of the I. O. O. F. and K. of H., and is a Democrat, having cast his first presidential vote for Horace Greeley. In 1870 he married Pina R. Fuson, daughter of Bethel and Sophronia Fuson. They have four children: John B. (who died in infancy), Heber J., Edner E., and an infant not named.

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William M. Cook, mayor of Clifton, and a prominent business man of the town, was born in Wayne County March 23, 1849, son of John L. and Mary Ann (Johnson) Cook, both of whom were natives of Wayne County. William M. was reared on a farm and secured a limited education in his boyhood days, and continued farming exclusively until twenty years of age. He then traded in stock until his marriage, at the age of twenty-two, with Almyra I. Montague. He then resumed farming and followed that and stock trading until 1882, when he engaged in steam saw-milling in the county, at which he has continued ever since. In December 1884, he moved to Clifton, and the following March engaged in the general merchandise business with G. W. Thompson, continuing the same up to the present time. May 11, 1886, Mrs. Cook died, leaving six living children: Nancy L., Jacob L., Mary, Thomas, Jessie and Nellie. Mr. Cook is a Democrat in politics, and in August, 1885, was elected to the office of mayor of Clifton. He is a Mason and K. of H. and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, in which faith his wife died.

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Capt Peyton H. Craig, clerk and master of the chancery court at Waynesboro, Tenn., was born in Maury County, Tenn., August 28, 1836, son of William and Amanda (Copeland) Craig, both of whom were born in North Carolina. Johnson Craig, our subject's grandfather, came with his family to Tennessee in December, 1806, and located near Mount Pleasant, where he followed stock raising and farming, and reared a family of fifteen children, and lived to see them all married and with families of their own. He died in Lawrence County about 1845. The father was reared in Maury County and married in Williamson County. In 1853 he moved to Missouri, and died in Laclede County in 1869. The mother died in Maury County, Tenn., when Peyton H. was an infant two weeks old, leaving three other children. The father raised a family of five daughters by his second marriage. Our subject was reared on his great-uncle's (William Blackwood) farm, and secured a good academic education. He prepared himself for teaching, which occupation he began at the age of seventeen years. In July, 1862, he abandoned domestic pursuits and enlisted as a private in Company A., Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate States Army. In 1863 he organizeda company and attached it to the Twentieth Tennessee Cavalry (Col. George H. Nixon), and served as its captain until near the close of the war. He was captured at Ashland by the Federals shortly before the surrender, but was soon paroled. He farmed in Wayne County, and also taught school during the fall and winter months, and in 1873 was appointed clerk and master under Chancellor Nixon, and has served continuously, by reappointment to the present time. It may be said to his credit that he has discharged the duties of this most important office in a highly satisfactory and efficient manner. In 1859 he wedded Martha A. Mitchell, who died in October, 1871, leaving four children: Mary A. (Mrs G. W. Jackson), Laura B. (wife of Dr. S. A. Smith), Sallie B. and Wilton. The Captain's second wife, Laura W. Ramsey, died in March, 1875, after less than two years of married life, leaving one child, now deceased. In 1882 he married his present wife, Miss J. Harvey, of Lawrenceburg, who has borne him one son, William Harvey. Capt. Craig is a Democrat, and takes an active interest in political affairs, not only in his county, but in the judical circuit and State at large. He was, however an old line Whig, as were his father and grandfather. He is a Mason of Royal Arch and Council degree, being Grand Marshal of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee. He is Secretary of the Grand Convocation of Past Masters of the State, and is High Priest of the local chapter, and Master of the lodge at Waynesboro. He is also a member of the K. of H., and he and wife are church members.

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Jonathan Crews, a prominent citizen of Wayne County, Tenn., was born in North Carolina in 1825. His parents, William and Malisent (Hicks) Crews, were natives of the same State, and came to Tennessee about 1830. The father was a farmer, a member of the Hardshell Baptist Church, and a Whig in politics, and during the late war stood firm for the Union. His death occurred in 1871, and his wife's in 1877. Our subject made his parents' home his home until attaining his majority, when he was married to Frances Morrow, a daughter of Archibald and Martha (Parker) Morrow. Mrs. Crews was born in this State in 1827, and is the mother of nine children: Martha A., Malisent, William, Mary E., Nancy J (deceased in 1886), Eletha C. (deceased in 1861), Sarah F., Archie F. (deceased in 1862) and Gustina. Mr. Crews was a resident of Lawrence County until 1864, when he came to Wayne County and resided on several different farms until 1881, when he purchased his present farm of 80 acres, on which he located and has lived to the present time. He and Mrs. Crews are members of the Hard-shell Baptist Church.

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Armstead H. Cunningham, the leading merchant at Forty Eight, Tenn., was born in this State in 1850, and is the son of John R. and Grace (Kimmens) Cunningham, of Tennessee birth. The father was a farmer by occupation, a member of the Free-Will Baptist Church, a Democrat in politics, and lived in Hickman County until his death, which occurred about 1874. Our subject's juvenile days were spent on a farm. He lived with his father until twenty-one years of age, when he began life for himself, teaching and clerking. In 1874 he purchased Samuel H. William's stock of goods at Centerville, Tenn., and did business in that place three years, one year being devoted to the hotel and livery business. He lost considerable property by fire, but, altogether, his career in that place was a success financially. For the next two years he was connected with the commission house of Mellen, Brown & Co, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1876 was married to Laura E. Clagett, daughter of Horatio and Elizabeth (Montgomery) Clagett. Mrs. Cunningham was born in Tennessee, in 1855, and immediately after her marriage she and Mr. Cunningham took an extended tour East, visiting New York, Pittsburgh, the Centennial Exposition and Niagara Fall. After their return Mr. Cunningham engaged in the mercantile business in Forty Eight, where he has since been successfully engaged. He is also postmaster of the town, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church. They have four children: John H., Southern S., Walker M., and James R. A remarkable feature of the family is that from the fourth generation there has never been a female child born into the family. They are of English descent.

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John R. Davis, Sr., is a Tennessean, born in 1823. His parents, Anderson and Annie Davis, were born in Virginia and North Carolina, respectively, and came to Tennessee with their parents when young. The father was a farmer and pioneer citizen of the county, and departed this life in 1873. His wife died four years later. Our subject lived with his parents until twenty-one years of age, at which time he was united in marriage to Jemima Hill, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Felkins) Hill. She was born in Tennessee in 1825, and is the mother of ten children: Annie C., Nancy E., Henry E., Mary J., John J. J., Joseph A., Catherine O., an infant, (deceased, not named), Parlee (deceased), and Anderson (deceased). Since his marriage Mr. Davis has farmed in different portions of the county and in Missouri, being in the latter place about four years. In 1878 he purchased the farm, of 188 acres, on which he now lives. It lies about nine miles from the county seat, and is in a good state of cultivation. In 1883 he erected a water-power, saw and grist-mill on his farm, the same having proved quite successful. he has held the office of justice of the peace since 1868, and is a Democrat. He and Mrs. Davis are members of the Christian Church.

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William C. Davis first saw the light of day in Maury County, Tenn., in 1838, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth Davis, who were born in Tennessee. The father was a farmer, and died about 1850. His wife died about five years later. Our subject remained with his parents until their respective deaths, when he resided two years with an uncle, and emigrated to Missouri. After remaining there two years he returned to Tennessee, and has been engaged in farming ever since. In 1859 he was married to Annie M. Davis, a daughter of Anderson and Annie Davis. She was born in Wayne County in 1839, and is the mother of eight children: John A., Lowly I., Cecil K., George W., Salathiel C., William O., Charles H. and Mary A. In 1877 Mr. Davis moved to his present farm, which contains 225 acres, and lies on Beech Creek. Besides this farm he owns 400 acres of land adjoining this, that is fair land. Mr. Davis and wife are members of the Free-Will Baptist Church, and he is a stanch Democrat in politics.

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William J. Dickerson, merchant of Waynesboro, Tenn., and a native of the county, was born August 6, 1861, son of James M. and Sarah A. (Arnett) Dickerson, who were born in Wayne County. The father was a successful stock trader and farmer, and resided in the Fifth District. He was a Republican in politics, and during the late war served in the Union Army as major of the Second Regiment of Tennessee Mounted Infantry, and was United States revenue assessor at Columbia, Tenn., for four years after the war. He died June 30, 1878. William J. was reared and educated in the county and followed farming, stock raising and saw-milling in the Fifth District until November, 1885, when he removed to Waynesboro, and engaged in the dry goods and general merchandise business in company with Huckaba Bros., and has remained with them to the present time, contributing largely to the success of this well known firm. April 3, 1884, he married Mary E. Hamm, of Wayne County. They have one child, Bessie C. Mr. Dickerson is a Republican.

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Columbus F. Dixon, was born in Wayne County, Tenn., in 1828, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Boyd) Dixon, who were born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee with their parents when quite young. The father was a farmer and distiller, and was very prosperous, supporting a family of seventeen children. His wife died November 23, 1863, and he took for his second wife Mary Foster, who was the mother of five of the children. Mr. Dixon died in Wayne County July 16, 1877. When twenty-four years old our subject married Sarah A. Springer, who was born in Tennessee, in 1836, and a daughter of Jonas and Annie Springer, and twelve children have blessed their union: Jonas S., Elizabeth A. (deceased), Mary J., Andrew J. (deceased), James M. (deceased),Robert M. (deceased), William F., Amanda P., and Ella (deceased). Mr. Dixon owns 369 acres of land, on which he has lived thirty-seven years; 150 acres are well improved and well tilled, besides this, he owns two other tracts of land consisting of 118 and 454 acres, respectively. He has filled the office of constable, and is a man who has lived an exemplary life. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a stanch Republican, and sided with the Union cause during the late war.

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Thomas S. Evins, M.D., a prominent physician of Wayne County, was born in Tennessee in 1846, and is the son of William A. and Eliza (Bobo) Evins, who were also Tennesseans. The father was a merchant and farmer, a Democrat and member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He died January 15, 1856, followed by his widow, in 1870. Thomas S. was united in marriage to Minerva J. Gullick in 1875. She is a daughter of Jonathan A. and Frances C. (Baker) Gullick. Her father is a prosperous farmer, and belongs to the Democratic party. He and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mrs.. Evins was born in 1846, and is the mother of two children: Frank, born March 3, 1876, died march 3, 1878, and Thomas J., born September 22, 1877. October 8, 1877, Mrs. Evins died. Our subject was educated in the best schools of Bedford County, and lived with his parents until their respective deaths, when he began reading medicine under Dr. H. P. Ferguson, and remained with him about one year. He obtained two courses of lectures in 1870-71 in Louisville Medical College, after which he located at Wayne Furnace, and after practicing there until 1874 he entered Vanderbuilt University, of Nashville, and attended the course of 1874-75, graduating in the latter year. From that time until his marriage he practiced in Waynesboro. Since that time he has resided on his father-in-law's farm. He is a Chapter Mason and has always been a stanch Democrat in politics.

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Isaac H. Gobbel is one of eleven children and was born in Wayne County, Tenn., in 1833, son of John and Ruhama Gobbel,who were born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee about 1820. They lived in different counties in Tennessee until 1853, when they located on a farm in Wayne County, and died in 1871 and 1866 respectively. They were church members and the father was a Democrat. After working for his father until twenty years of age, Isaac H., our subject engaged in tilling the soil on his own responsibility. In 1852 he married Eliza Murphy, who was born in balmy Alabama, in 1837, daughter of George Murphy. Of the eleven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Gobbel all are living, except John W., the eldest, who died in 1882. The rest are William R., Sarah C., Nancy C., Isaac H., Mary, Rebecca, Paraletha, Martha J., Joseph E. and Benjamin P. In 1862 Mr. Gobbel joined the Federal Army and served until Lee's surrender. He was captured in 1863, while at home on a visit, but after being in captivity one month, made his escape and returned to the army. In 1873 he purchased the farm on which he now lives, consisting of 198 acres of fairly improved land. He is a stanch Republican, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Gobbel has lived in this vicinity all his life, and is a good neighbor and honest and prosperous citizen.

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John Grimes is a Williamson County Tennessean, born in 1811, son William and Sallie (Little) Grimes. The father was born in South Carolina and came to Tennessee when quite young, locating in Nashville. He was a farmer and one of the Rangers who, during the war of 1812, assisted in keeping the Indians within their boundary, and for his services drew a land warrant. He was a member of the church from early manhood. His wife died in 1817, and he then married Martha (Akins) Roah. She died in 1841, and the father in 1855. At the early age of sixteen our subject began doing for himself. He did farm work for several years, and made his first purchase of land on Hardin Creek. After living on this, and another farm which he had purchased, he removed to Arkansas, but returned after a short time. In 1860 1860 he purchased the farm on which he now resides, containing 800 acres, 100 being in a fine state of cultivation. He has served the people as magistrate almost continuously since 1836, making a good and efficient officer. He is a Republican, and was a strong Union man during the late Rebellion, furnishing three sons for the Federal Army. In 1836 he married Elizabeth M. Stubblefield, daughter of Peter and Sallie (Harris) Stubblefield. Mrs. Grimes was born in Georgia in 1817, and is the mother of thirteen children: William P., who died in 1838; Sarah A. E., who died in 1859; James G.; Robert N., who died in 1863; John M.; Martha E.; Mary J.; Amanda C.; Millard F.,; Henry C., who died in 1882; Benjamin F.; Eliza F., and an infant deceased, not named. Mr. Grimes is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and his wife of the Methodist Church. The Grimes family is of Irish decent.

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Harold A. Grimes, of the firm of Hughes & Grimes, is a Wayne County Tennessean, born October 16, 1853, son of Elihu S. and Nancy Malissa (Keaton) Grimes, who were born in this county. Wilson Grimes, our subjects grandfather, was one of the very earliest settlers of the county. Harold A. was reared on a farm in this county. His father dying in 1855, he was obliged to begin earning his own living early in life. In 1870 he began life as a salesman, but soon relinquished this occupation to complete his education. He attended andtaught school until 1873, and the following year went to Texas and clerked in a mercantile establishment in Dennison three years, and the same year returned home and married Emma L. McDougal, of Savannah, Tenn., who died four months after their marriage. In 1879 Mr.Grimes removed to Clifton and followed clerking until 1882, when he accepted a position as traveling salesman for a wholesale dry goods house in Nashville, remaining such about six months. He then accepted a similar position with a boot and shoe firm, of that city, at which he continued until January, 1885, when he engaged in his present business as above stated, and has contributed largely to the success of this well known firm. March 20, 1884, he married his present wife, Annie O. Chappell. They have one child, Bettie Elsie. Mr. Grimes is a Democrat, and wife are members of the K. & L. of H. He is president of the Clifton Temperance Alliance, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

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Robert A. Haggard, attorney at law of Waynesboro, Tenn., is a native of Wayne County and son of James Haggard, Esq., whose sketch appears in this work. Robert A. was educated in the common schools and was reared on a farm. At the age of twenty-one he became a disciple of Blackstone, with the view of making law a profession, and entered the law department of the State University of Iowa in 1880, and graduated in June, 1881, with the degree of LL.B. He returned home and began practicing in October, 1881, and has continued to the present time, with good success. November 29, 1883, he married Annie C. Norman, a native of Lawrence County.. They have one child named Nona. Mr. Haggard is a Republican in political views, and is a candidate on that ticket for county clerk, subject to the August (1886) election. He is among the successful and enterprising young lawyers of the county, and bids fair to rank among the first in his profession in the State.

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Egbert T. Hartwell, of the firm of Hartwell Bros., of Delphos, Ohio, and Clifton, Tenn., manufactures of handles, neck-yokes, singletrees, ect., was born in Denmark, of the Empire State, January 26, 1846, and is the son of Morris and Louisa (Taylor) Hartwell, who were born in New York and Ohio, respectively. Egbert T. was reared on a farm and received a liberal education in the common schools of New York. After attaining his majority he began life for himself, and after visiting various parts of the West, located at Delphos, Ohio, in 1872, and engaged in his present business there, remaining until 1881, when he came to Clifton, tenn., and started his present business, which is a branch factory of the one in Delphos, Ohio. Mr. Hartwell was married, October 4, 1882, to Laura A. Taylor, daughter of William H. and Melissa Taylor,of Chardon, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Hartwell have one son, Charles E., born October 7, 1883. They are members of high standing in the church, and our subject is a member of the F. & A. M. fraternity and is a Democrat in his political views, and of English descent.

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Amos T. Hassell is a son of Enoch and Joanna (Ensley) Hassell, and was born in Tyrell County, N. C., August 15, 1814. His parents were also natives of North Carolina. His father came to Tennessee in 1834, locating in Perry County (now Decatur County), where he followed farming, being a justice of the peace until his death, which occurred about the beginning of the war. He had been quite a distinguished politician in former years, and represented Tyrell County in the North Carolina Legislature. Amos T. Hassell came to Tennessee with his father and at the age of twenty-one left home to do for himself, having little or no education. Later he acquired a good business education by his own exertions, and soon after leaving the paternal roof he began life as a clerk and soon engaged in the mercantile business for himself at Carrollville. In 1844 he came to Waynesboro and continued the same business until 1860, when he sold out and repaired to his farm in the Fourth District until 1871, when he returned to town and built his present large commodious hotel and business house, and conducted both in his usual successful manner. In August, 1885, he retired from the management of the hotel, but still conducts his mercantile establishment. Mr. Hassell was engaged in the mule trade, both before and after the war, and also managed a tannery, saddlery and shoe manufactory. He has in all probability contributed more to the business industries and prosperity of Wayne County than any other one citizen. April 30, 1846, he married Mary Ann Biffel, a sister of Col. Jacob Biffel. She died in 1860 leaving three children: Ella Ann (wife of Dr. Buchanan), Mary C. (Mrs. J. W. Montague), and Joanna (Mrs John F. Montague). August 22, 1861, he married Mrs. Eliza Jane (Heron) Jones. They have one daughter. Laura E., the wife of Frank Boyd. Mr. Hassell is and always has been an unswerving Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for Van Buren. He served six years as clerk and master under Chancellor Stephen Provat, before and up to the war, and also under Judge R. H. Rose after the war. He is a Mason, Royal Arch and Council degrees, and is one of the leading and enterprising business men of Wayne County.

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Henry A. Helton, clerk of the circuit and criminal courts at Waynesboro, Tenn., was born in Wayne County on the 11th of January, 1846, son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Morgan) Helton, natives, respectively, of North and South Carolina. Jesse Helton, our subjects grandfather, came to Tennessee with his family about 1819 or 1820 and located on the head waters of Indian Creek in Wayne County. He was a hatter by trade, also a mill-wright, and gave the most of his attention to the latter occupation. He was one of the successful men of his day, and died in Hardin County about the beginning of the late war. Our subject's father spent the greater part of his life in Wayne County and is now residing a short distance south of Waynesboro. Henry A. received a common school education in his boyhood days, and in December, 1862, enlisted in the Federal Army in Company F, Sixth Regiment Tennessee Cavalry, serving until the close of the war. In 1867 he engaged in the liquor business in Waynesboro, but at the end of two years converted the business into a family grocery and general merchandise store, which he conducted until 1872. Since that time he has been almost constantly engaged in the mercantile and drug business, being a member of the firm of Turman, Helton & CO. Mr. Helton was a Republican from the time of the war up to the Kuklux troubles in this section, in 1870, and postmaster here three years under Grant's administration. He was elected register of the county in 1869, serving until 1873. May 18, 1876, he was appointed by Judge T. P. Bateman to the office of the circuit and criminal court to fill a vacancy, and the following August was elected to the office, and has filled it very efficiently, by re-election, up to the present time. January 21, 1869, he married Samantha C. Christie, and four children have blessed their union: Lemuel L., Walter A., Charles J. and Serepta. Mr. Helton is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the K. of H. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and his wife of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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Jacob Hollabaugh, a pioneer of Wayne County, Tenn., was born in 1822, son of George and Catherine Hollabaugh, who were born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee about 1818, locating in perry County, where the father resided until his death in 1824. The mother died in 1856. Jacob resided with his widowed mother until after his marriage, which occurred in 1842, to Rosanna Harvey, daughter of James and Rachel Harvey. She was born in Tennessee in 1824, and became the mother of the following family: Mary J., James C., Rachel A., Elizabeth C., George T., John T., Frederick W., Buchanan B., Madison J., Isham G. Harris, Midda V., Joseph B., Luther W., and Jacob S., Elizabeth C., John T. and Joseph B. are dead. Our subject resided on the home farm until 1864, when he sold out and purchased the farm on which he is now residing, consisting of 314 acres, well improved. He has a fine variety of various fruits, and gives considerable attention to bee culture. He has always been industrious, and accordingly has prospered. He and wife joined the Methodist Episcopal Church South in 1842. Mr. Hollabaugh is a Mason, and always has been a stanch Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for James K. Polk.

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James P. Hollis is a son of William and Sarah (Moore) Hollis, who were born in Tennessee in 1802 and 1809 respectively. The father was a farmer in Wayne County in 1804. His wife, who bore him four children, died in 1834, and he then wedded Sarah Kilburn, who was born in 1814, and who became the mother of five children. She died in 1854, and his third wife Jane Yaw, bore him five children. He lived in Wayne County until his death in 1875. His father, James Hollis, was was born in 1759, and married his second wife, Sarah Choete, in 1794, she being born in 1772. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and was a prosperous farmer of Wayne County. He died in 1844. Our subject, James P., lived with his father until 1853, when he married Sarah R. Dixon, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Boyd) Dixon. She was born in 1835, and is the mother of fourteen children: John D., Sarah E., (who died in 1856), William P. (who died in 1859), Mary M., Martha F., Nancy P., Joseph B., Columbus F., James M., Ada R., Fountain J., Arthur T., and one infant deceased, not named. Mr. Hollis has a good farm of 170 acres, on which he raises principally corn. he has held the office of deputy sheriff, constable, and in 1870 was elected justice of the peace, and yet holds the office. He is a Mason and Republican, and he and Mrs. Hollis are members of the Baptist Church.

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James A. Holt's birth occurred in Tennessee in 1852, and he is a son of Israel and Mary J. (Davis)Holt, who were also Tennesseans. The father was a farmer, and served in the Confederate Army during the late war. He died in Wayne in Wayne County in 1866. James A. Holt's early days were spent on his father's farm, and after the latter's death he made his home with his widowed mother until his marriage, in 1876, when he began life for himself as a farmer. In 1875 he began merchandising on Beech Creek, and has been quite successful. His store is superior to those generally kept in the country, and is liberally patronized by the surrounding neighborhood. The farm on which he lives was inherited by his wife from her father's estate, and consists of about 250 acres. In 1882 he was elected justice of the peace, and has faithfully discharged the duties of this office up to the present time. In 1882 he erected a cotton-gin on his farm, and has kept it in good working order. He is a Democrat, and his first presidential vote was cast for S. J. Tilden. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and was married, in 1876, to Louisa J. Tumbo, daughter of Hugh and Mary Tumbo. Mrs. Holt was born in Tennessee in 1860, and is the mother of three children: Hugh I., Dora Lee, and an infant deceased, not named.

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Thomas J. Huckaba, clerk of Wayne County (Tenn.) court, and native of the county, was born March 15, 1851, and is one of seven surviving members of a family of thirteen children, born to the marriage of George E. Huckaba and Rhoda Y. Rainey. Thomas J. secured a common school education, which he much improved, however, in later years, by much desultory study and reading, and constant contact with business and official life. At the age of twenty years he began life for himself, and worked at manual labor as a wood chopper until his twenty-fourth year, when he began farming on rented ground, and in 1878 he and his brother purchased a tract of land in the Fifth District. They improved this somewhat, and from time to time purchased other lands, until our subject owned a one-half interest in 400 acres of land. In August of this year he was elected to the office of county clerk, which he has filled continuously by re-election, to the present time. During this time Mr. Huckaba has retained an interest in farming. In November, 1883, he, in company with his brothers, William F. and John F., and a friend, Louis A. Hardin, established a general merchandise store in Waynesboro, which is now successfully conducted under the firm name of Huckaba Bros. & Co. They began business with a very limited capital, but by industry, strict business integrity and close attention to business, have succeeded in establishing a good and paying business. He and his brothers, mentioned above, and William J. Dickerson now compose the firm. December 25, 1881, he married Mildred S. Hamm, of Wayne County. To them were born two children: Robert (deceased) and Clarence H. Mr. Huckaba has always been a stanch Republican, and he and wife are consistent members of the Missionary Baptist Church. John F. Huckaba, member of the above-mentioned firm, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., April 25, 1845. He was reared on a farm in Wayne County, and secured a limited early education. In 1863 he enlisted in the Federal Army, serving as private in Company H, Second Tennessee Mounted Infantry. He had his left hand seriously and permanently wounded before the company was mustered in, and was rejected on this account, and served in all, but a few months. Until October. 1883, he farmed, then engaged with his brothers in his present business, and has contributed largely to its success. December 8, 1867, he married Mary Ann Morrison, and five children are the result of their union: Fannie E., James A., George M., Mary E. and Emerson. Mr. Huckaba and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and he is a Republican in his political views.

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Hughes & Grimes, merchants, of Clifton, Tenn., began business in 1885. The business was established by T. R. Hughes in 1854, and was conducted by him, in connection with his brothers and various partners, until his death, November 21, 1883. From that time up to 1885 the firm was known as T. S. Hughes & Co., and at that date became known as Hughes & Grimes. They keep a fine stock of fancy and staple dry goods, clothing, notions, boots and shoes, hats, gents' furnishing goods, groceries, hardware, queensware, tinware, furniture, agricultural implements, seeds, ect., and control a very large trade in town and county. Thomas S. Hughes, of the above named firm, was born in Wayne County August 30, 1862, and is a son of Frank and Elizabeth (Tinnon) Hughes, who were born in Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. The father came to Tennessee in 1855, and was engaged in mercantile business until his death, February 10, 1872. The mother died March 15, 1878. Thomas S. was brought up in the mercantile business with his uncle, T. R. Hughes, after his father's death. He secured a good literary education, attending the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. In March, 1883, he engaged in his present business and has shared the success of this well known firm. he is proprietor of the warehouse at Clifton, and does a large commission business, receiving and forwarding all the goods handled on the river. He is a Democrat, a member of the K. of H. and K. & L. of H., and belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. January 8, 1885, he married Bettie Speer, of Hardin County.

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William Hurt, the leading merchant of Flat Woods, Tenn., was born in Carroll County, Tenn., in 1841, son of Robert M. and Emily (Dickson) Hurt, who were born in Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. The father became a resident at the age of nine years, and was a farmer and merchant by occupation. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and a Democrat. After his wife's death, in 1856, he married Martha E. Woods, widow of W. H. Woods. Both reside in Carroll County. At the age of twenty our subject enlisted in the Confederate Army, and was captured at Missionary Ridge and taken to Rock Island, Ill., where he was retained until the close of the war. He fought in all the principal battles up to the time of his capture, receiving only a slight wound at Murfreesboro. After his return home he began merchandising with two partners at Trezevant, Carroll Co., Tenn., but the firm dissolved at the end of six years. Mr. Hurt was elected county trustee by the county court, to fill an unexpired term. He spent two years in Obion County farming, and for several years afterward was engaged in different pursuits. In 1882 he and George W. Harris, of Louisville, Ky., opened a general merchandise store at Flat Wood, and are now doing a thriving business. He is a Mason, a member of the Missionary Baptist Church and a Democrat, and was married, in 1865, to Mary E. Woods,daughter of William and Martha E. Woods. She was born in 1843, and became the mother of one child, Robert. Mrs. Hurt died in 1868, and in 1884 Mr. Hurt married Ada Whittaker, daughter of John C. and Susan Whittaker. She was born in 1866, and is the mother of one child, Roe.

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John Jackson is a son of John and Polly (Walker) Jackson, and was born in Tennessee in 1821. He assisted in tilling his father's farm until twenty-four years of age, when he married, in 1845, Susan T. Skillern, and began doing for himself. Mrs. Jackson was born in Tennessee in 1822, daughter of Anderson and Polly (Spring) Skillern, and is the mother of eight children: David S., John A., Mary E., William J., Sarah C., George W., and two infants, deceased. Mr. Jackson has lived in his present neighborhood all his life, and is an honorable and prosperous citizen. His farm consists of about 420 acres of land in good state of cultivation, the principal products being corn, small grain, clover and stock. Mr. Jackson has served as county trustee one term, and as constable and justice of the peace many years. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is a Mason and Democrat. His father and mother were natives of North Carolina, and Tennessee respectively. The former was a farmer and was with Jackson in the Creek war, and was a Whig in politics. His wife died in 1822, and he took for his second wife Polly Adams. He moved to Wayne County in 1822, and here died in 1855. His second wife died in 1866.

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David S. Jackson is a Wayne County Tennessean, born in 1847, son of John and Susan (Skillern) Jackson, both of whom were natives of Tennessee. John Jackson was a tiller of the soil, and for two terms served as county trustee, holding minor offices in the county also. He was a successful stock trader, and has always been a stanch Democrat. He and Mrs. Jackson are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. David S. resided with his parents until twenty-five years of age, when he married and began carving out his own fortune on the farm of 152 acres where he now lives, the principal productions of which are corn, grass and stock. In September, 1864, he enlisted in the Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate States Army, under Col. Biffle, and served until Hood's raid into Tennessee, when ha was captured, while on a visit home, and retained at Nashville about fifteen days. He took the oath of allegiance and was allowed to return home. He participated in all the battles fought during Hood's raid, the principal being at Franklin. He belongs to the Democratic party, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mahala R. Merriman, daughter of Eli and Rachel Merriman, became his wife December 24, 1875. She was born in 1848.

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Squire Allen P. Luna is a Marshall County Tennessean, born on the 13th of August, 1842, son of Robert and Martha Luna, natives of Tennessee. Allen P. was educated in the common schools of Marshall County, and in early life followed the free and independent life of a farmer's boy. March 11, 1866, he united his fortunes with those of Nancy J. Cummins, daughter of George W. and Sarah Cummins, of Tennessee. Our subject moved to Lawrence County and settled at his present place of residence in 1876. He has since devoted the greater part of his attention to the grocery and general merchandise business. He is also postmaster at Chisem postoffice, and in 1882 was elected squire in the Sixth District of Lawrence County, and has filled that position very efficiently to the present time. Mr. and Mrs. Luna became parents of the following interesting family of children: Sallie M., Henry D., Hattie V., Cora D., Nora B., Delbert R. and Almino. Our subject is a Democrat in his political views, and is of French-Irish descent.

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Richard C. Martin, a prominent farmer and merchant of Wayne County, Tenn., is a native of North Carolina, born March 22, 1830, son of James and Nancy (Cantrell) Martin, both of whom were born in North Carolina. The father came to Tennessee in 1831, and followed farming for a livelihood and prospered in his undertakings. He died in 1843, and his wife in 1840. Our subject resided with his parents until their respective deaths, and he and his brothers and sisters continued to till the home farm. In 1855 he came to Wayne County and sold goods at Flat Wood, on Buffalo River, and remained there until 1869. He then purchased his present farm on Indian Creek, and farmed and raised stock for about five years, at which time he rented his farm and moved to Waynesboro and became a partner in the dry goods, grocery and hardware firm of Bromley & Martin. Since 1881 he has managed his farm of 360 acres with good success. His marriage with Mary A. Burns was consummated in 1860. Of their three children, two are living: Mary E. (Mrs. C. H. Boyd) and Ora M. Mrs. Martin died in January, 1880. Mr. Martin is a Democrat and is classed among Wayne County's most enterprising and successful farmers.

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James E. M. McAnally is a son of Elisha R. McAnally, who was born in North Carolina, and who was a gunsmith and farmer by occupation. He married Feriba Bowdon, of Georgia, and they together reared a family of twelve children, and accumulated some property. He and Mrs. McAnally were members of the Christian Church, and he was a Whig in politics, and sided with the Union during the late Rebellion. His wife died in 1865, and he in 1873. Our subjects birth occurred in Wayne County in 1830. He began farming for himself at the age of twenty-five years, years, and after living in different localities in the county, finally, in 1870, purchased his present farm of 160 acres. Besides this, he owns about 500 acres in different localities in the county, and devotes the most of his land to the production of corn, small grain and peanuts. In 1855 he united his fortunes with those of Fannie Robnett, daughter of John and Nancy (Staggs) Robnett. She was born in 1834 and is the mother of eight children: Tolbert F., Houston, Ellender, Louisa, Esther, Margaret, Timothy R., and an infant, not named. Mr. McAnally and his wife are members of the Christian Church, and he has always been a firm Republican in politics.

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LeRoy McGee was born in 1825, in Wayne County, Tenn., son of Micager and Betsey McGee. The father was a farmer and blacksmith, and although he began life poor in purse, he accumulated considerable property. The mother died about 1840, and the father then married Margaret Wisdom. He died about 1854. Our subject began doing for himself at the age of eighteen, and at the age of twenty married Martha Clayton, born in 1826, daughter of Hardy and Fannie Clayton, and by her is the father of eight children: Frances E., Mary J., William C., Susan (who died in 1883), James H., Rachel A. E. and Leroy S. Since his marriage Mr. McGee has resided on the farm given him by his father. It contains 848 acres of land, 200 acres being the original gift. The rest of the land has he accumulated by his own exertions. His farm is well supplied with water and is very productive, being on Factory Creek. During the late Rebellion Mr. McGee sided with the Union cause, and has since been a loyal, honorable and prosperous citizen. His children have all married except the youngest son, who still remains at home.

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Elihu D. McGlamery, register of Wayne County, Tenn., was born in this county January 14, 1838, son of John and Catherine (Brinker) McGlamery, who were born in Georgia and Virginia, respectively. The father came to Tennessee when a young man, about 1816, and lived for a short time in Lincoln County, then moved to Madison County, Ala., and in 1819 came to Wayne County, Tenn., where he raised a family of four sons and six daughters, and followed farming here until his death, in December, 1857. Our subject's school days were somewhat limited. He early learned the carpenter's trade and in October, 1863, enlisted in the Federal Army, serving in Company B, Second Regiment Tennessee Volunteer Mounted Infantry, first as private. He was promoted to first lieutenant, serving in this capacity until he was mustered out after one year's service. He resumed carpentering and also farmed in the Twelfth District until 1870, when he removed to Waynesboro, and in 1874-76served as deputy sheriff. In August, 1868, he was elected sheriff of the county, and filled this office very efficiently and satisfactorily two terms, when he was elected to his present office, filling this position in an equally satisfactory manner. He has recently been engaged in contracting and building in Waynesboro. October 29, 1857, he married Nancy D. Turman, of Bedford County. Mr. McGlamery is a stanch Republican in politics, and is a member of the K. of H.

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James H. McLemore's birth occurred in Halifax County, N. C., in 1826, and he came to Tennessee in 1844, with his mother and step-father. His own father, Joel H. McLemore, was a tailor by trade, and followed that occupation for many years. He died on a farm to which he had retired in 1835. His widow, Betsey (Pullen) McLemore, then married John Whitaker, and after coming to Tennessee died in 1858. Our subject was married February 1, 1849, to Sallie A. Whitaker, daughter James C. and Delphia (Lyon)Whitaker. She was born in North Carolina in 1828, and came to Tennessee with her parents in 1844, and is the mother of ten children: Virginia W., Richard M., James W. (who died September 13, 1858), Mary E. (who died June 11, 1886), Delphia D., Anna, Sallie H., Robert L. (who died October 14, 1867), John Pullen and Nora. Our subject lived with his father in North Carolina until the later's death. He acquired a good education, and after his mother's second marriage continued to reside with her until 1849, when he began life for himself. He purchased his present farm in 1849 and has ever since been a tiller of the soil. His farm consists of 412 acres of well improved and exceptionally fertile land in a good state of cultivation. He and his wife are church members, and he is a Mason and a stanch Democrat.

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Thomas Meredith was born on the 9th of July, 1804, son of Frederick and Mary (Fulton) Meredith, who were born in North Carolina and Virginia respectively, and came to Tennessee in 1800. They were married the same year and became parents of eight children, two of whom are yet living. The father was a farmer and located in East Tennessee, and afterward lived in this State and Kentucky until 1816, when he located in Wayne County, on Buffalo River, and there died in 1826. His wife died in 1863. Up to 1824 our subject resided with his father. At that date he married Mary A. Rasbury, daughter of Lovick and Jane Rasbury. She was born in Georgia in 1805, and came to Tennessee when quite young. She became the mother of three daughters and seven sons. Three of the children are dead. Mrs. Meredith died May 20, 1872, and on the 20th of May, 1877, Mr. Meredith married Mary A. Benham, who was born in Tennessee in 1829, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Benham. Mr. Meredith has been a life-long farmer, and in his young days was very active and powerful, being always ready to assist his neighbors in log rolling, etc. He built a portion of the house, in which he now lives, about fifty years ago, hewed the logs and used the old whipsaw in making joist and other necessary articles. He purchase his present home-farm of 120 acres in 1837, and continued to purchase land from time to time until his real estate amounted to 2,000, acres. During the war he lost, in slaves and security debts, nearly all the property he had accumulated. He has been magistrate of the county for over half a century and has been trustee two terms. He also served as deputy sheriff for six successive years. He has been a life-long Democrat, and furnished five sons for the Confederate Army. He has been a member of the Hardshell Baptist Church for over fifty years. His son, Lovick R. Meredith, was born in Wayne County, in 1827. He remained with his parents until twenty-seven years of age, when he married Anna B. E. Matthews, who was born in Tennessee in 1832, daughter of William Matthews, and immediately began life for himself, working at the following callings: merchandising, stock trading, milling and farming, the latter occupying the principal part of his attention. He is a Democrat, and has served as constable of his district. He enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1862, and served until the final surrender, participating in many of the principal battles. In 1857 he located on his present farm of 1,000 acres, having besides this, 500 acres in different tracts. he is Mason, an honorable and well known citizen, and a Prohibitionist. His children are Mary E., Leonidas T., Ledru R., William W., Lenora E., Deborah O. and Belle M.

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James F. Meredith is also a son of Thomas Meredith, and was born in Wayne County in 1832. His early days were spent on his father's farm, and at the age of twenty years he married Mary A. Grimes, who was born in Tennessee in 1836, daughter of Henry and Mary A. (Stockard) Grimes. To James and Mrs. Meredith were born the following family: Lydia A. M. F. (who died in 1868), Jane E. B., Alice E., James F. T., Ula A., Annie E. (who died in 1868) and Joseph L. In November, 1885, Mrs. Meredith died. In 1856 Mr. Meredith purchased and located on his present farm of 900 acres on Buffalo River. Besides this he owns 1,600 acres partially improved, on the north side of that river. At the beginning of the late war he enlisted in the Confederate service, but did not take an active part until 1862, when he enlisted in Biffle's regiment, but owing to sickness could only serve a few months. He then returned home, and has since farmed, being very successful in that calling. He has always been a stanch democrat in politics.

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James H. Merriman is a native of Wayne County, born in 1834, sonof Eli and Rachel (Tankersley) Merriman. The father was born in Tennessee, and was a farmer by occupation and a whig in politics. He came to Wayne County in 1816, and lived until his death in 1851. The mother is yet residing in the district, and is seventy-six years of age. After the father's death our subject resided with his mother until thirty-four years of age, when he began farming for himself. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate service and served throughout the war, not receiving a wound during his entire service. He returned home in May, 1865. In 1869 he purchased his present farm, consisting of 320 acres. he is a Democrat in his political views, and belongs to the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 127. In 1868 he married Frances E. A. Shields, daughter of J. T. and Martha D. (Olds) Shields. She was born in Tennessee in 1850, and became the mother of eleven children: Martha E., James R., Joseph E. (who died in 1881), Thomas F., John C., Rachel C., David H., Virginia A., Walter N., Cynthia R., and Clare B. Mr. Shields is a member of the Christian Church, and his wife of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

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John F. Montague, one of Wayne County's prominent farmers and stock raisers, was born in that county July 13, 1851. He was educated in the Clifton Masonic Academy, in Wayne County, and when about eighteen years of age he and his brother, William Y., began keeping drugs in Clifton. In 1871 he sold out that business and commenced the study of law, and graduated from the Cumberland University in 1873. He then located at Waynesboro, and practiced his profession with much success until 1883, when he abandoned his his legal practice and moved on his present farm of 600 acres. About 150 acres of land are in a fine state of cultivation. Besides this property he is owner of a fine tract of bottom land on the Tennessee River, in Hardin County. He has given considerable attention to stock raising since locating on his farm, and owing to his industrious habits and good business qualifications, has acquired a fine patrimony. He belongs to the Democratic party and F. & A. M. fraternity. To his marriage with Joanna Hassell, in 1875, the following children were born: Amos H., Mary Anna E., Edna C., Frank and Joanna. Mr Montague is of French descent.

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James L. Morgan in a son of Pleasant and Jane Morgan, who were born in North Carolina and Alabama respectively. The father is a farmer, and also follows blacksmithing. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and in politics he is a Republican, and stood firm for the Union during the late war. Our subject was born in Wayne County, Tenn., in 1841, and remained with his father until 1862, when he enlisted in Company A. Tenth Tennessee Regiment of the Federal Army, andremained in the field until the close of the war. He returned home in July, 1865, and remained with his father until he was married to Mrs. Mary (Miller) Girard, daughter of Micager and Mary Miller. Mrs. Morgan was born in Alabama in 1839, and by her first marriage is the mother of two children: Charles T. and Lula B. She and Mr. Morgan are the parents of three children: Viola B., Lillie H. and Dieudonie R. Mr. Morgan's farm, which he purchased in 1867, consists of 140 acres of fairly improved land. The principal products are corn, grass, peanuts and small grain. Mr. Morgan located on this farm in 1872. He was constable of his district a short time, is a Republican in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for U. S. Grant. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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Hon. Jonathan Morris, a prominent citizen of this county, was born in Logan County, of the Blue-grass State, in 1815, son of William and Rebecca (Grimes) Morris, who were born in Tennessee and moved to Kentucky about 1814, remaining only a few years, when, they returned to Tennessee. The father was a farmer, and served in the war of 1812, participating in the battle of New Orleans. He was a Whig, and died about 1850, His widow was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and died a few years later than her husband. Our subject resided on the old homestead until he attained his twenty-first birthday, when he began fighting the battle of life for himself, and in a few years was elected deputy sheriff of the county and held the office three years. He also held the office of county court clerk for four years, and in 1843 was elected to the State Legislature. Since the war he has served as State senator two years and has filled the office of county judge one term. He was elected to the office of county superintendent of public instruction and filled that position very creditably for two years. Mr. Morris has devoted the greater part of his life to public duties, but of late years (since 1857) has retired to his farm of 1,200 acres (which he has owned for several years), lying between Green River and Chalk Creek. Adjoining this farm he has about 3,000 acres of fertile and well watered land, making as fine a stock farm as there is in Tennessee. He has several different farms in different localities in the county, which he is desirous of selling. Besides this large amount of real estate, he owns several grist and saw-mills. Since the war he has lost about $20, 000 worth of property by fire. Mr. Morris was married, in 1844, to Nancy J. Montague, daughter of Abraham and Clarissa Montague. She was born in Wayne County July 5, 1823, and is the mother of the following children: Martha R., born January 5, 1847, died November 3, 1863; Wayne, born August 24, 1852; James E. H., born August 31, 1855, died March 26, 1881; Clarissa F., born September 20, 1859, died March 25, 1886; Thomas F., born February 10, 1861, died October 6, 1884, and and infant, deceased. march 7, 1883, Mrs Morris died. She was a Methodist in belief. Mr. Morris has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South since 1840. He is a Mason, member of Lodge No. 127, and is a stanch Democrat in politics. He has been very successful financier, and is one of the worthy and honest citizens of the county.

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Hon. Merida Morrison is a Tennessean, born in 1827, son of Edward and Lucy Morrison. The father was a wagon-maker by trade, but owned and lived on a farm. He was in the war of 1812, and after his death his second wife drew a pension. The mother died in 1847 and the father married Elizabeth Butler, and died in 1866. His second wife died in 1885. Our subject assisted his father in the shop and on the farm until his marriage, and since that time has devoted the most of his attention to farming. he purchased his present farm of 385 acres of land, and devotes it principally to the raising of stock. He served the people many years as justice of the peace, and in 1860 was elected to the State Legislature and served one term. In 1845 Mr. Morrison married Miss Lydia Hardin. She was born in Alabama in 1828, and came with her parents to Tennessee when quite young. She is the mother of the following children; Margaret A., William D., Mary A., Martha A., Sofina E., Nancy J., Merida (who died in 1868), Joseph C., and an infant deceased. Mr. Morrison and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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William D. Morrison was born in Tennessee in 1850, son of Merida and Lydia (Hardin) Morrison, whose sketch appears in the work. Our subject's early days were spent on a farm. He made his home with his parents until twenty-three years of age, when he in partnership with his brother-in-law, purchased the farm on which he now resides. Two years later he became sole possessor. This farm lies on both sides of Green River and contains 286 acres of fairly improved land. Mr. Morrisson is a Democrat and Prohibitionist, and in 1882 was elected justice of the peace and yet holds the office. In 1875 he was married to Lizzie Burns, daughter of Samuel L. and Sallie Burns. She was born in Tennessee in 1853, and is the mother of four children: William S., Sallie, Kate and Mildred. Mr. Morrison joined the Baptist Church at the age of seven-teen. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

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John J. Nichols, merchant of Clifton, Tenn., is a Perry County Tennessean, born July 2, 1855; son of John J. and Martha J. (Buckner) Nichols. Our subjects Grandfather Nichols came from North Carolina to Tennessee at an early day, and located in Hardin County. His son John J., was born in North Carolina, but spent the greater part of his life in Perry County, following mercantile pursuits and the slave business, until his death, when our subject was but two years old. The mother died in 1868, thus leaving our subject to do for himself at an early age. He secured a fair education, and when about eighteen years of age , engaged in mercantile business as clerk. In 1879 he came to Clifton and clerked until 1882, when he engaged in the family grocery business. In May, 1884, he removed to his present quarters, and added dry goods and general merchandise to his stock, and now carries a full and select line of goods. Besides this he handles a line of agricultural implements and wagons, being agent for the Harrison wagon. he is a Democrat, and is considered a reliable business man of the town. In 1876 he Married Rutha J. Harbour, of Hardin County. They have one child, Edna Belle.

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James A. Nutt is a native of Wayne County, Tenn., born in 1842, son of Maben A. and Rebecca (Montgomery) Nutt. Maben A. was a farmer and shoe-maker and minister of the gospel of the Old Baptist persuasion. he raised a family of ten children, and in 1869 came to Wayne County, where he accumulated some property and died October 4, 1873. The mother died in 1884. After the father's death, James lived with and near his mother until her death. He inherited a portion of the old home place, and is owner of 350 acres of well cultivated land. In 1872 he and Sarah Davasier were united in marriage. She is the daughter of Green and Malinda Davasier, and was born in Tennessee about 1854. David A., Pleasant G., Anna Lee, Maggie, William and an infant daughter (deceased) are the children born to their union. In 1862, Mr. Nutt enlisted in the confederate services, Capt. Whiteside's company, and remained in service until Hood's raid in Tennessee, when he was wounded at Nashville and taken to the hospital, where he remained a short time. he was at Atlanta, Jackson, Missionary Ridge and many other battles, and was always at post of duty. He is a stanch Democrat in politics.

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Andrew C. Rasbury, a pioneer of Wayne County, Tenn., was born in 1816, son of Lovick and Jane (Campbell) Rasbury, who were North Carolinians. They came to Tennessee in 1814, and settled on the farm where our subject now lives, in 1816. The father died in 1858 and his widow in 1875, being ninety-eight years of age. Our subject has lived on the home farm since one year old. It consists of 525 acres of fairly improved land, 135 being in a high state of cultivation. In 1843 he married Jane Voorhies, a daughter of David and Elizabeth Voorhies. Mrs. Rasbury was born in Tennessee in 1820, and is the mother of the following eight children: John C., (an infant, deceased, not named),Mary A., Elizabeth J., Alonzo M., Eudoxia R., Surilda A., and Lovick D. Three of the children are dead. Mr. Rasbury served in the Confederated Army four months, and lost considerable property during that conflict. He served as constable for a short time, and also as deputy sheriff. He is an enterprising citizen and a good and prosperous farmer. He belongs to the Democratic party.

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Lott G. Rasbury was born in Tennessee in 1811, and is son of Lovick Rasbury. (see sketch of A. C. Rasbury.) He has followed the free and independent life of a farmer from boyhood, and was married at the age of twenty-three and began doing for himself, but continued to reside on his father's farm. He wedded Elizabeth Phillips, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Phillips. Mrs. Rasbury was born in 1813 and died in 1835, leaving one child - Sarah J. After his wife's demise our subject returned to his father's house, and made that his home until 1843, when he married Rebecca, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Grimes) Benham. Mrs. Rasbury was born in this state in 1812, and is the mother of seven children: Elizabeth (who died in 1875), Lydia C., Mary, Martha A., William L., Rebecca E. and John A. (who died in infancy). Mr. Rasbury has confined himself to farming and stock raising from early boy-hood, and has prospered well in his undertakings, owning in all about 790 acres of land. He has served the people as magistrate of his district for fourteen years, and has made a good and efficient officer. He took up arms during the Rebellion in behalf of the Confederacy, but was only in actual service about three weeks, when he supplied a substitute and returned home. He is a Democrat and a member of the Primitive Baptist Church.

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W. T. Ricketts was born in Wayne County, Tenn., in 1841, son of Samuel S. and Mary (Roper) Ricketts, who were born in North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father became a wealthy merchant of Clifton, and was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He was a Whig, and died in 1863. His wife died twelve years earlier. The father's second wife was Mary J. Walker. Our subject was married, in 1866, to Nancy L. Montague, daughter of John and Nancy Montague. She was born in Tennessee in 1846, and is the mother of eight children: Della M., John S., Milton (who died October 15, 1873), Frank, Joseph, Mary, Tennessee R. and Nancy. Mrs. Ricketts died July 21, 1882, and November 13, of that year, he married Melissa Montague, sister of his first wife. She was born about 1842, and is the mother of one child, James T. At the age of ten years our subject moved to Clifton with his father, where he remained until 1879, when he purchased and moved on his present farm of 275 acres of land on Buffalo River. He gives his principal attention to raising corn and peanuts, and is extensively known in the county. He is a member of the Cumberland presbyterian Church, and in May, 1861, enlisted in the Confederate Army, in the First Tennessee Regiment, but was discharged on account of disability. He re-enlisted in the Ninth Tennessee Regiment, and was captured in Wayne County in July, 1863, and was retained until the close of the war. He has been magistrate of the Clifton District for several years, also postmaster of Flatwood. He is a Democrat.

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John Robnett, a pioneer of Wayne County, Tenn., was born in the Palmetto State in 1804, and is a son of John and Margaret (Nesbitt) Robnett, natives of Delaware and South Carolina, respectively. They came to Tennessee in 1816, and were the second family that located in Wayne County. The father until his death, which occurred about 1824. The wife died in 1819. The father took for his second wife a lady by the name of Farris, who died in 1831. John Robnett, our subject, resided with his step-mother two years after his father's death, when he moved on his present farm of 1300 acres. In 1828 he married Nancy Staggs, daughter of Joseph and Fannie (Nesbitt) Staggs, and their union has been blessed in the birth of ten children: Joseph N, John, Cynthia P., Fannie, James, Margaret, Jane, Jerimiah, Neal S., and Ellender. Mr. Robnett in now eighty-two years old, but bids fair to live many years yet. He vividly remembers many incidents of pioneer life, and the hardships, with which the early settlers were obliged to contend, in the settlement of the county. In politics he is a Republican, and furnished two sons for the Union Army. His wife is a member of the Christian Church.

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James T. Shields is a native of Maury County, Tenn., born in 1825, son of William B. and and Mary D. (Ramsey) Shields, bornin Georgia and North Carolina, respectively. The father was a farmer, member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a Democrat. He came to Wayne County in 1851, and here died in 1872. His wife died in 1860. Our subject was married, in 1847, to Martha D. Old, a daughter of Henry S. and Eglantine (Stone) Old. She was born in Tennessee in 1830, and is the mother of three children: Mary E. (deceased), Francis E. A. and Virginia I. Mrs. Shields died in May, 1884. Our subject remained at home and assisted his father on the farm until twenty years of age. After his marriage he located in the northern portion of Giles County, where he remained three years, and then moved to Wayne County. In 1863 he located on the farm of 500 acres where he now lives. He became a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in 1865, and is Mason of Lodge No. 127. He is a stanch Democrat.

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Charles W. Shipman, sheriff, and native of Wayne County, Tenn., was born on the 17th of March, 1838. He was educated in the common schools of his native county, and in 1863 enlisted in the Federal Army, in the Second Tennessee Regiment of Mounted Infantry, as a private, but was soon commissioned first lieutenant, and was afterward made captain of Company D in the same regiment. After the final surrender he returned to Hardin County, and was elected sheriff of that county in 1866, and held that office two terms. In 1870 he moved to his farm on Indian Creek, where he followed agricultural pursuits until 1875. He then located at his present place of residence, where he owns 200 acres of land, 100 acres being well cultivated. Mr. Shipman started in life with no other capital other than that bestowed upon him by nature, but has surmounted many hardships and difficulties, and is now well to-do in worldly goods. In 1880 he was elected trustee of Wayne County, and held the office until 1884, when he was elected county sheriff, and yet holds the office. He is a stanch Republican in his political views, and belongs to the K. of H. and F. & A.M. fraternities. Jane E. Arrendell became his wife January 17, 1867, and the following children were born to them: William H., Henry T., Eddie, Jesse T., Ida E., Ola M., Charles and Pantha U. Mrs. Shipman's parents were Erasrus and Mary Arrendell, and our subjects parents were Edward and Elizabeth (Thompson) Shipman.

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Matthew J. Sims is a son of Robert and Frances (Merritt) Sims, and was born in North Carolina June 9, 1816. (See sketch of A. M. Sims, for parents history.) After attaining his majority he began doing for himself. His early education was such as could be obtained in the rude and primitive log schoolhouses of his boyhood days. he followed farming and school-teaching for ten or twelve years, and in 1840 purchased a large farm on Indian Creek, where he farmed and raised stock until 1865. After the close of the war he established his general merchandise store in Waynesboro, and continued with good success up to the present time. In 1865 he was appointed clerk of Wayne County Circuit Court, and held that office ten years. In 1837 he united his fortune with that of Dorothy Greeson, of Bedford County, Tenn., and their union has been blessed in the birth of ten children, eight of whom are living: Shields, Elizabeth (Mrs. J. McWilliams), Z. Taylor, H. C., Winfield S., Dorothy A., (Mrs. John Turman), Mahulda C. and Malinda T. Mr. Sims is a stanch Republican, and was clerk of the circuit court a number years, and also held the office of magistrate, and is one of the old and strictly honorable citizens of the county.

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Shields Sims was born in Wayne County, Tenn., December 18, 1838, son of Matthew J. and Dorothy (Greeson) Sims, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father was one of the early settlers of Giles County and a farmer by occupation. Since the war he has been engaged in the mercantile and tannery business in connection with farming. He is seventy years old and his wife is sixty-nine years of age. Shields Sims was reared on a farm and secured a good common education. At the age of twenty-one he began doing for himself, and in 1863 enlisted in Company H, Second tennessee Mounted Infantry, Union Army, and served as first sergeant. After his return home in 1865, he resumed farming, and soon established a tan-yard, which he managed four years, and then purchased his present farm of 290 acres on Falls Branch of Indian Creek. Besides this he owns 300 acres and has an interest in 160 acres near his home. He has farmed and raised stock on his present farm since 1870 and has met good success. In 1859 he married Edith M. C. Youngblood, daughter of Josiah Youngblood, who was born in Rutherford County September 29, 1818, and a son of William and Edith (Reed) Youngblood. William was among the early settlers of Rutherford County. He was a farmer and died in 1844; his wife dies in 1875. Josiah has farmed for himself since 1837, and the same year wedded Mary Horton, who died in 1879, leaving two living children, Edith M. C. and M. Elizabeth. Mr. Youngblood is a Republican, and a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. Mr. and Mrs. Sims became the parents of eight children, seven of whom are living: Jeannette J. (Mrs. W. T. Nowlings), Mary M. (Mrs. James Kowland), Dorothy J, MatthewJ., Sarah E., John S. and Francis. Mr. Sims is a Republican, was magistrate of his district six years, and in now one of the board of school commissioners. He and family are members of the Baptist Church, and he has been a Mason since 1868 and joined the Union League in 1866.

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Henry Clay Sims, trustee of Wayne County, Tenn., was born on the 15th of November, 1844, son of Matthew J. Sims, of Waynesboro. Henry C. secured the ordinary common schooling in his boyhood days, and in 1863 enlisted in Company H, Second Tennessee Federal Mounted Infantry, serving as a private in the late war until its close. He was conscripted by the Confederates in 1862 and taken to Libby prison, but managed to make his escape and joined the Union Army. Since the close of the war, up to the present time, he has farmed in Wayne County, and has been fairly successful. He is a stanch Republican in his political views and as such was elected to the county trustee's office in August, 1884, and has discharged the duties of his office to the universal satisfaction of all. he was re-elected to the office in August, 1886. August 5,1865, the nuptials of his marriage with Jemima C. Copeland, of Wayne County, were celebrated. They have three children: Mahulda Isaphene, Dorothy W. and Mabel. Mr. Sims is a member of the masonic fraternity, and he and Mrs. Sims are worthy members in the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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Abraham Sims was born in Wayne County, Tenn., June 13, 1834, son of Robert and Frances (Merritt) Sims, who were born in North Carolina. The father was one of the early settlers of Giles County, Tenn., coming to that county about 1819. He helped to clear and settle the country and was a successful farmer. He moved to Wayne County in 1834, and died in March, 1842. The mother died in 1871. Our subject made his home with his parents until he was seventeen years of age, and after his father's death conducted the home-farm for his mother and sisters. In 1863 he enlisted in the Tenth Tennessee Infantry, and served as high private until September, when he was mustered out on account of bad health. He resumed farming, and in 1868 purchased his present place of 150 acres and is doing well financially. Mr. Sims has earned his property by sweat of his brow, and now enjoys his home. In 1875 he married Hannah Stockberry, a native of Anderson County, Tenn. They have four children born to them, three of whom are living: Joseph, Robert M. and Mary O. Mr. Sims belongs to the Republican party and has been magistrate of his district for eight years. Himself and family are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and he has been a member of the Masonic fraternity eighteen years and was a member of the Union League a short time after the war. Mr. Sims is one of Wayne County's successful farmers and stock raisers, and is recognized as a moral and upright citizen.

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Samuel A. Smith, M. D., of Waynesboro, Tenn., and a native of the county, was born on the 3d of September, 1857, son of John and Catherine (Kemper) Smith, who were born in Virginia. The father was born in 1814, came to Wayne County when he was a young man, and settled on a farm on Buffalo River, in the Third District, where he married and reared a family of five sons and one daughter. He died March 12, 1871. Samuel A. was reared on his father's farm and secured a limited early education. He began the study of medicine in 1881, and attended the medical department of Vanderbilt University during the sessions of 1882 and 1883, graduating in the latter year. He began practicing in the Sixth District of Wayne County, in June, 1883, but removed to Waynesboro in June, 1886, where he since has been successfully engaged in the practice of his profession. December 25, 1884, he married Laura B., daughter of Capt. P. H. Craig, and by her is the father of one childnamed Jessie. Dr. Smith is a Democrat and one of the leading practitioners of Wayne County.

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John Stockard (deceased) was born in Wayne County, Tenn., in 1819, and was a farmer by occupation, and quite an extensive dealer in stock. He was magistrate of the Sixth District for many years, and discharged the duties of that office honorably and creditably. He was a member of the cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a stanch Democrat in politics, and furnished four sons to the Confederacy. His first wife was Eliza Craig, who bore him nine children: William N., James J., John M., Mary J., Augustus Z., (deceased), Samuel H. (deceased), Thomas A., Leroy V. and Isom C. His wife died in 1860, and in 1863 he led to the hymeneal alter Mary E. Priest, daughter of Abram and NancPriest. Mrs. Stockard was born in Tennessee September 24, 1838, and is the mother of seven children: Cora A., Charles F., Lena, Eula, Bettie D., Edgar and Mosella, who died February 24, 1878. In 1880 Mr. Stockard purchased the farm of several hundred acres of fairly improved land on which his widow now lives. He died November, 1883, and Mrs. Stockard has successfully managed and controlled the home place. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

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Willis S. Stone is a Tennessean, born in 1840, son of Samuel E. Stone, who was born in Virginia and came to Tennessee when a young man; he followed the mercantile business, first in Wilson County, and afterward in Jackson County, where he resided until his death, in 1854. He was sober, industrious, and very popular among his friends. His widow married Daniel W. Hawes, and both reside in Gainesboro, Jackson Co., Tenn. Wilis S. was reared in Gainesboro, and there resided until 1858, when he came to Flatwood and began clerking in the mercantile house of James Matthews, remaining with him until 1861, when he enlisted in the Eighth Tennessee Infantry under Col. Alfred S. Fulton. He was captured at Missionary Ridge and taken to Johnson's Island, and there retained until the close of the war. He was at Perryville, Murfreesboro, and many other battles of note. In April, 1866, he married Ruth T. Pillow, daughter of Alvin G. and Mary (Holt) Pillow. Mrs. Stone was born in 1842, and is the mother of six children: Samuel H., Mary P., Ruth, Bransford and John P. In December, 1865, Mr. Stone opened a mercantile store at Flatwood, and did a successful business for about ten years. In 1883 he purchased his farm of 200 acres, with 90 acres adjoining. He is a Mason, and was elected county trustee. His many years of public life have made him very popular and well known. He is a stanch Democrat in politics. Back To Top Of Page

Christopher C. Stribling a prominent business man of Clifton, Tenn., and a native of Lawrence County, was born November 24, 1844, son of Andrew H. and Sarah E. (Elton) Stribling, natives of the Palmetto and Keystone States, respectively. The father was born in 1816, and came to Tennessee with his father, John Stribling, in 1834. John, who was an own cousin of Commodore Cornelius K. Stribling, surveyed Lawrence County, where he died in 1882, being the oldest citizen of the county and the oldest Mason in the United States. Andrew H. Stribling married and raised his family in Lawrence County. He was married twice, his second wife being Rachel Clayton. Three children were born to each marriage. At the close of the war he moved to Wayne County, where he farmed, and died in 1884. Christopher C. resided with his parents on a farm and secured a fair English education. At the age of seventeen he enlisted in the Federal Army and served with Company F, Twelfth Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He, with his regiment, was captured at Shiloh, and after two months imprisonment, was exchanged and discharged in August, 1862. He re-enlisted soon after in Company A, Second Tennessee Mounted Infantry, and served as second lieutenant of his company a part of two years. In 1864 he joined Company E, Eighth Tennessee Mounted Infantry, having helped raise the company, and served as regimental and post quartermaster until the close of the war. He located in Wayne County, and acted as deputy sheriff two years, under Maj. Dickerson. He was elected county court clerk, and after serving part of a four years' term, resigned, on account of the ill health of his family, and later engaged in the drug and mercantile business, continuing at Waynesboro until 1875. In 1874 he established the Wayne Citizen, which he conducted successfully until the latter part of 1875, when he moved to Clifton and successfully conducted the same until 1885. In January, 1886, he began keeping drugs and general merchandise, in partnership with T. S. Hassell, and has since continued. He is and always has been a stanch Republican. He is a Mason, Royal Arch degree, and a member of the K. of H. and K. & L. of H. In 1866 Mr. Stribling married Emma I. Cypert, who died in 1875. In 1877 he married his present wife, Amelia A. Waites. They have three children: Thomas H., Monetta L. and Pattie S. Just after the war Mr. Stribling, in company with Col. Owen Hane, was engaged in prosecuting claims against the United States, being under the celebrated John O'Neal, who afterward became famous as commander of the Irish-American Fenians.

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Carns M. Tinnon a well-to-do citizen of Clifton, Tenn., was born in Giles County, Tenn., November 15, 1828, son of John and Jane (Davidson)Tinnon, who were born, respectively. in Illinois and the Palmetto State. Our Subject's juvenile days were spent in Giles and Lawrence Counties, the family removing to Lawrence County when Carns M. was but twelve years of age. Early in life he began learning the blacksmith's trade and followed that occupation in connection with farming, in Lawrence County until October, 1871, when he came to Waynesboro and engaged in blacksmithing, in which he has been very successful. He is a Democrat in political views, but was formerly an old line Whig, and is considered one of the eminent and successful business men of Wayne County.

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William Turman was born in Bedford County, tenn., November 16, 1839, son of John C. and Mary A. (Parker) Turman, natives, respectively, of Georgia and Tennessee. John C. Turman came with his father to Tennessee in 1807, when he was but five years old. They located in Bedford County, and here he was reared, married and raised his family. He came to Wayne County in the fall of 1855, locating on a farm, but later came to Waynesboro, where he died May 4, 1881. He was a Democrat before, and a Republican after the war, being elected to the office of county trustee, but would not serve. He was a consistent member of the Baptist Church, as was his wife, who died June 11, 1857. William was reared a farmer's boy and was educated in the common schools. In 1863 he enlisted in the Federal Army as a private, in the Second Tennessee Mounted Infantry, but was never mustered in account of physical disability, but served with the regiment one year. In the fall of 1867 he came to Waynesboro and engaged in the mercantile and liquor business, in which he has remained continuously to the present time. He has given farming considerable attention and owns 600 acres of good farming land. He is connected with the saw-milling interests of the county and has added largely to the wealth and prosperity of the county. His residence in Waynesboro is the finest in the county. In 1872, he married Ione Cypert, and four children have blessed their union: Camilla, William B., Sarah and Benjamin D. Mr. Turman is a Republican in politics and a prominent business man of the county.

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John Turman, a member of the well-known firm of Turman, Helton & Co., of Waynesboro, Tenn., was born in Bedford County, October 18, 1848, son of John C. and Mary A. (Parker) Turman. [See sketch of William Turman] His early life was spent on a farm and in acquiring a common school education. In 1869 he began merchandising at Martin's Mills, and remained there a year and a half. He then came to Waynesboro and engaged in a similar business here, carrying on the same up to the present time. He has been more than ordinarily successful, financially, and is one of the reliable business men of the county. He is a Republican and has taken quite an active part in the political affairs of the county. December 12, 1877, he married Dorothy A. Sims, of Wayne County. They have four children: John, Lizzie, James and Benjamin.

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Ambrose M. Turnbow was born in the State of Tennessee, in 1853, son of S. H. and Martha Turnbow, who were also natives of the State. The father was an agriculturist, and held different offices in the county for many years. He died in 1875, and his widow in 1878. Ambrose M. assisted his father on the farm, and at the age of twenty one became the architect of his own fortunes and engaged in farming. In 1874 he has united in marriage to Mary Carroll, who was born in Tennessee, in 1856, and is the mother of five children: William, James W., John, Delia, and an infant not named. In 1880 Mr. Turnbow purchased his present farm, which contains about 500 acres of fairly improved land, on which he raises corn, cotton and stock. he inherited the sum of $300 from his father's estate. he started in life a poor boy, but energy, honesty and perseverance has accumulated considerable property, and is justly styled a leading citizen. He is a stanch Republican in politics.

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Andrew Williams, a pioneer of Wayne County and a native of the STate of Tennessee, was born in 1826. His father, William Williams, was a farmer and distiller, utilizing the products of his farm. His wife died in Wayne County, in 1863, and he in 18_4. Up to the age of eighteen, Andrew Williams resided on his father's farm. After his marriage to Violet A. King, July 4, 1844, he began doing for himself. His wife was born about 1816, and was a daughter of Joseph and Catherine King. She died in 1870, and in 1873 he married Mrs. Jane E. (Meredith) Bell, widow of William R. Bell, who was born in North Carolina and came to Tennessee when a young man. He was a tanner by trade and followed this successfully until 1850 until 1850, when he purchased the farm of 800 acres on which Mr. and Mrs. Williams now live. He was always quite successful in his business ventures, and departed this life in 1865, leaving four children: Thomas A., Joseph R., Lovick R. Bell and an infant deceased, not named. Mrs. Williams was born in Tennessee in 1825, a daughter of Thomas and Mary A. (Rasbury) Meredith. After Mr. Williams' first marriage he lived on his father's until 1875, when he located on his present farm. He has retired from active life and gives his attention to deer and fox hunting. He has been an energetic and prosperous man through life, and is a stanch Democrat in politics.

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J. & M. Youngblood are merchants of Clifton, Tenn., and established their business in September, 1885. They carry a large stock of staple and fancy goods, hats, boots and shoes, groceries and general merchandise. Matthew Youngblood, manager of the business, was born in Wayne County, Tenn., May 6, 1856, son of John William and Margaret (Sims) Youngblood, who were born in Wayne County also. The father was a successful farmer and merchant, and removed to Missouri where he died December 6, 1874. Our subject was reared in his native country and secured a fair education. At the age of twenty five he began clerking in Waynesboro, and after one year's service there came to Clifton, and was salesman until 1883. He then engaged in the mercantile business in Linden, Perry Co., Tenn., continuing until they established their present business in Clifton. His twin brother Joseph, who is one of the firm, has been successful traveling salesman for a Louisville grocery firm since 1881. He is a Republican, and has contributed largely to the success of the firm.

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