Occupation: “Cowboy”
~ 1910 ~
Nye County Nevada
Page © TNGenNet, Inc. 2005. All Rights Reserved.
Transcription: © Fred Smoot 2005


Pre-printed return envelope.
Circular black postmark:
       CURRANT NEV SEP 3 AM 1910
Postage:
       Two U.S. 1 cent stamps
Addressee:
       THE W.W. GAVITT MEDICAL CO.
       TOPEKA,
       KAN., U.S.A.

       Three Buildings


Letter    Man is Blind

Envelope    Order Blank

Report of Agency

Letter:
Currant Sept 2/1910
W.W. Gavitts
  Enclose find $1.00 greenback for one box of Gavitts System Regulator please put up in capsules as I am a cattle man and riding after cattle most of my time it would be more convenient for me to use. My stomach is bad and my kidneys in fact my whole system seems to be out of order. Please send by return mail without delay and oblige.
Mr. Joseph Cazier
Currant
Nye Co
Nevada



Notes:
1.  The W.W. Gavitt Medical Co. of Topeka Kansas appearently saved their mail orders since there are a great many of these orders in the hands of collectors and postal history dealers. Their monetary value is small but these orders may have family value to descendants.
2.  From the Nevada State Museum Newsletter website:
“...The [Cazier] family acquired the uppermost ranch on Current Creek around the turn of the century when Samuel Cazier and his sons, Edcil, Joseph, Hyrum, Edmond, and Owen came and purchased the property...
“...This enterprising family from Utah was, like most families in the area at the time, very self-sufficient. They produced most of their own food, including vegetables in their garden in addition to the hay and grain they raised for sale. Their orchard provided fruit to be eaten fresh or dried for the winter, a smokehouse converted the hogs they raised into hams, and a waterwheel on the property powered a gristmill, which converted grain into flour. Wood for construction of ranch buildings came from the sawmill the brothers operated in the nearby mountains; they also provided lumber and timber for area ranchers and miners until the 1920s. Although the brothers sold their ranch, descendants of the Caziers remain in the area...” Robert D. McCracken and Jeanne Sharp Howerton, A History of Railroad Valley, Nevada, Central Nevada Historical Society, 1996.



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This page last updated on Thursday, August 13, 2015