MY RIVERSIDE CEMETERY TOMBSTONE
INSCRIPTIONS SCRAPBOOK

by Jonathan K. T. Smith
Copyright, Jonathan K. T. Smith, 1995

NOTES BY LOT

(Page 10)

CALLAWAY LOT, NO. 264

The stone for CHARLES C. BROOKS has the dates: Feb. 22, 1850-Apr. 23, 1872. In the TRIBUNE AND SUN. JACKSON, April 27, 1872, a notice, "Tribute of Respect. At a meeting of the Faculty and students of West Tennessee College, held in the Chapel, at 1 o'clock p.m., April 24th," a lengthy resolution of respect was paid to Charles Callaway Brooks, a member of the Senior Class of West Tennessee College, referring to his uncommon diligence, unfailing punctuality and truly Christian deportment.

 

PART OF THE CAMPBELL LOT, NO. 296
[Lot 296 in Tombstone Inscriptions]

DR. ALEXANDER JACKSON
Born
Feb. 22, 1805
Died
Jan. 20, 1879
We will meet again.

TRIBUNE AND SUN, Jackson, January 24, 1879:

DR. ALEXANDER JACKSON died suddenly in this city on Monday night about 10 o'clock. He had been down town in his usual good health during the day and returned to his residence at 5 o'clock, ate supper . . . and retired at 9 o'clock. He arose from his bed shortly afterward and went into an adjoining room, complaining of chilliness and in a few moments, told his wife he was dying, to lay him on his bed and in a short time expired. Dr. Jackson was born in Halifax County, Virginia about 1802. Left an orphan in early years, he was raised by an affectionate uncle, Mr. Samuel Miller, a noted educator of that day and who also educated him and under his auspices was prepared for the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, where he graduated in medicine in 1823. He immediately settled in his native county of Halifax, where he practiced his profession until 1827 when he removed to Paris, Henry County. Tenn. . . . In that place he had a large and lucrative practice until he removed to this city in 1840. He continued his practice here until 1847 when he retired from the profession. He married Miss -- Hurt, daughter of Rev. Mr. Hurt, formerly of Halifax County, Va. Two sons of this marriage Judge Howell K. and Gen. V. H. Jackson, survive their father. Mrs. Jackson died young. . . . He them married Miss Susan Freeman of this county. Two sons of this marriage, James and Milton Jackson, survive their father. This wife also died in . . . early years. In 1850 Dr. J. married Mrs. Eunice B. Fennner. Two sons of this marriage, Samuel N. and Robert F. Jackson, survive their father.Dr. J. was the kindest and most affectionate of fathers . . . (he) was a man of good cultivation of mind and a memory that embraced everything brought to his attention

A Friend

 

When Dr. Jackson's beautiful monument was placed at his grave in the spring after he died by a Louisville firm, there was comment made in the newspaper about its attractiveness even yet, worn with many years, it is still a credit to its creator(s).

 

MARY JACKSON LOT, NO. 386B

In memory of
MARY W. JACKSON
Wife of
Dr. A. Jackson
Who was born Nov. 22nd
A.D. 1811
And died May 23, 1841
She loved her God and she loved her neighbour.

 

MOORE AND OTHERS LOT, NO. 310
[Lot 308 in Tombstone Inscriptions]

MALISSA K.
Wife of
Robert C. MOORE
Born Dec. 25. 1831
Died Sept. 9. 1850
Shed not for her the bitter tear
Nor grieve with bitter regret
Tis but the casket which lies here
The fore is sparkling yet.
(Sparkling')

Robert C. Moore, a stage-driver, was married to Malissa Sanders, Oct. 31, 1843. She was a daughter of Francis Sanders.

 

TOMLIN LOT, NO. 324

Beneath
Repose all
that could die of
AMANDA CAROLINE
Wife of John L. H. TOMLIN
and daughter of
Benj. & Elixa Elder
Born Dec. 1, 1827,
married May 19, 1846,
and died Nov. 1. 1853

(This box vault has been repaired. the top part replaced and beautifully incised. The 1937 copyist rendered her birth date as I've given it above the one I use as it matches a census report; the death date was given as Aug. 12, 1851 in 1937. The 1975 copyist copied only 1853 in her death date. I have left Nov. 1, 1853. hoping the restored date is somehow correct.)

 

T. M. GATES LOT, NO. 32

THOMAS M. GATES
1838-1922

Thomas H. Gates' Tennessee death certificate states that he was born December 4, 1836 and died August 15, 1922; a cotton broker; parents: W. W. Gates and Annie McCutchen Gates.

 

(Page 11)

T. HENDERSON LOT, NO. 238

THOMAS HENDERSON
Born
June 5, 1819
Died
May 19, 1877

 

THE JACKSON SUN, May 25, 1877:

In this city on the 19th of May, 1877, after a long illness of consumption, Capt. Thomas Henderson in the 57th year of his age. Deceased was born in Raleigh. N.C. He came to Tennessee at the age of four years and spent his youth at old Mount Pinson in this county. For many years of his manhood he was a Citizen of Jackson. For over thirty years he did business in New Orleans. During the war he commanded a company of scouts in the Confederate Army and won distinction as a soldier. He was connected with some of the oldest and best families of the city and his wife, nee Miss Orman Butler who survives him, represents an old and honored family in the history of Tennessee. He was twice married, having one child by the first and two by the last marriage. As a citizen soldier and gentleman he was the peer of the best, bravest and truest, who have made this West Tennessee county illustrious.

 

Thomas Henderson was THRICE married:
1. to Anna Lancaster, July 25, 1848.
2. to Marion Patterson, Nov. 2, 1852; one surviving child, Susan.
3. to Mary Ormond Butler, June 6, 1865; several children.

The NASHVILLE REPUBLICAN (Tenn.), July 17, 1836, carries an announcement of the death of COLONEL THOMAS HENDERSON, about 60 years old, who died in Sumpter Co., Alabama, June 22; late of Madison County. Tennessee.

 

J. BOND LOT, NO. 290

In
memory of
CHARLES A. BOND
He was born in Williamson Co., Tenn.
Nov. 27, 1824
And departed this life
July 7, 1853

WEST TENNESSEE WHIG, Jackson, July 14, 1853, noted the death of Charles A Bond, late of Williamson Co., Tenn., of a "violent attach of fewer, " July 7.

In his diary, volume 1, page 16, Robert H. Cartmell wrote. July 6, 1853, "Went up to see Chas. Bond, found him worse. did not recognize me." July 7, "With Charles Bond the entire day. He died at 15 min. past 2 o'clock pm, how distressing to see a man in fine health, but a few days ago in the prim of life. Surrounded by good relations & friends in the world. . . . He was truly the noblest work of God, an honest man, sincere in his friendship, open and candid in every thing, none could know but to esteem him highly." July 8, "Attended the burial of Chas. Bond today 10 o'clock, he was buried with masonic honors."

 

SOUTH SLOPE
Not far east of the Confederate graves

JAS. M. SALE
Aged 17 Yrs. & 3 Mos.
He was killed by the cars,
Jan. 21, 1878

TRIBUNE AND SUN, Jackson, January 25, 1878:

"Crushed to Death by the Cars"

Last Monday evening (Jan. 21) about 4:30 p.m. a young man was fatally crushed at the Lafayette Street Crossing of Miss. Cent. RR (railroad) in this city. Mr. W. T. Rogers was sitting on his horse waiting for the train to pass when he observed a man on top of a stock car who made a motion as if to get off on the street. He started to descend the ladder on the side of the car. His foot slipped and he fell between the cars, his right leg across the track and his body off. The front wheels of the car passed over his right leg and cut the bone clear in two within three inches of his body. He struggled away so as to get his leg nearly off when, the rear wheels struck his heel and cut it almost entirely off. His first and second fingers on his right hand were also cut off. Rogers rushed to his assistance as quickly as possible and pulled him away from the train. He told Rogers to take out his book and write as fast as he could. He gave his name as James Sayle of Plano, Texas. He requested that a dispatch be sent at once for his father to come, stating that his father was able to come to him and pay his doctor's bill. Me said he was a tramp and was trying "to beat his way" home from New Orleans via St. Louis. He was removed to a Negro women's house near the square and died there at 10 p.m. Nearly all the physicians in the city called to see him and they decided that it would give him unnecessary pain to amputate his leg as he must die in a few hours. He was conscious all the time to within five minutes of his death. The dispatch was sent to his father as requested. His remains were buried by the city authorities. He was a young man, not far from 20 years old and of fair intelligence and he had no one to blame for his fate but himself.

 

SHELTON AND OTHERS, LOT NO. 214

The tombstone on this part of Lot 214 (north), that of William Shelton, seems to be that of JAMES SHELTON, who died August 21, 1878, aged 85 years.

 

(Page 12)

NORVELL LOT, NO. 334

THOMAS G. NORVELL
Born in
Hanover Co. Va.
In 1800
Died in
Jackson , Tenn.
Sept. 228, 1875
(This atone is broken, into two parts.)

There are several tombstones to the members of the Norvell family, including Thos. G. and his brother, John R. Norvell, whose obituary gave the following:

TRIBUNE AND SUN, Jackson, January 12, 1878.
John R. Norvell died July 6, 1872, aged 82. Deceased settled in Jackson in 1825 and in connection with his brother, Thomas, who died some years ago, carried on the brick business up to (the) Civil War. . . . These brothers did the brickmasonry for the Madison Co. Courthouse, 1839 and St. Luke's Episcopal Church and numerous other local buildings.

 

STEPHENS LOT, NO. 406A

(double-stone)
JAMES KEMP STEPHENS
Oct. 9, 1828-Aug. 10, 1877
MARY LOUISA MILLER
wife of
James Kemp STEPHENS
Aug. 2, 1832-Dec. 19, 1891

TRIBUNE AND SUN, Jackson, April 24, 1877.
Died. James K. Stephens, Esq. Born 1826, Staunton. Va., died Aug. 10, 1877, attended West Tenn. College; served as private secretary (a very young one!) to Pros. James K. Polk. Bro. of Wm. H. Stephens.

 

HASKELL LOT, NO. 326

GEN. WM. T. HASKELL
He was a Soldier
and Statesman

Robert H. Cartmell, in his diary, volume 2, page 13, March 13, 1859, "Heard this evening that Wm. T. Haskell was buried in Jackson today. Raised in Jackson since a boy, wrote of his brilliant oratorical skill. He died in the lunatic asylum in Hopkinsville, Ky. where he had been 3-4 years, reason said to stem from his intemperance."

TENNESSEE, THE VOLUNTEER STATE, by John Trotwood Moore, volume 2 (Nashville, 1923), pages 140-141. Moore took this article almost verbatim from Joshua W. Caldwell's SKETCHES OF THE BENCH AND BAR OF TENNESSEE, published in Knoxville, 1898, pages 236-241.

WILLIAM T. HASKELL.

        It is the well nigh universal opinion that the most eloquent of all our public speakers was William T. Haskell. His father, Joshua Haskell, came to Tennessee from Rhode Island and settled at Murfreesboro, having served previously in the Creek war. He was a lawyer, and in 1821 was appointed Judge of the newly-created Eighth Circuit, and removed to Jackson, in Madison County, so as to reside within his circuit. In 1829 he was impeached, but was acquitted for want of a constitutional majority against him, the vote being a tie. He held the office for fifteen years.
        William T. Haskell was born at Murfreesboro, July 21, 1818, and was educated by private tutors and in the schools at Jackson until he was sufficiently advanced to enter college. Sometime prior to 1835 he entered the University of Nashville, but did not complete his course there. Probably the University of Nashville never had a more negligent student.
        He was a poet, an orator, a converser, a dreamer. By reason of extraordinary natural gifts, he acquired certain things without effort. These were the things to which he was naturally Inclined. The things that required effort went unlearned. The mathematical faculty rarely goes with the poetic or oratoric temperament, and seems to have been almost entirely wanting in his intellectual make-up. Leaving college without a degree, he enlisted for the Seminole war in 1836, and served with credit. There was excitement in war, and he incessantly craved excitement. Moreover he had many soldierly gifts.
        Returning home after the war he became a lawyer, and as early as 1840 drifted into politics and made a canvass for the Whig party, and In the same year was elected to the Legislature from Madison County.
        In 1844 he canvassed the State for Henry Clay, making some of the marvelous speeches upon which his fame rests.
        In 1846 he enlisted for the Mexican war, and was elected Colonel of the Second Tennessee Regiment of Volunteer Infantry. He was a gallant soldier and a capable leader, and came from this war with a reputation second, among the Tennesseeans, only to that of the splendid leader of the "Bloody First," William B. Campbell.
        Probably his best political speeches were made in the campaign of 1856, and the greatest of these was delivered at Knoxville in the first week of September of that year. This week witnessed one of the last demonstrations of vitality in the Whig party.
        He had every grace and gift of the orator and unlimited flow of purest and strongest words, the finest fancy, the richest imagination, the most pleasing and effective action, a voice of unequalled beauty and compass. A generous enthusiasm and patriotism fired his heart, and doubtless tradition speaks the truth when It declares that this was the grandest oration ever heard on the soil of Tennessee, the culminating effort of a splendid genius, an outpouring of captivating, resistless eloquence.
        Haskell was by nature a great actor, and his speeches were always essentially dramatic in quality and in effect.
        This great speech brought to Haskell, already famous, a reputation such as no other public speaker in Tennessee ever enjoyed, and the reputation was deserved. Genius and eloquence are words much abused, but to Haskell both may be applied in truth. He was a man of genius as truly as was Webster or Chatham, or any other of the world's great orators. Like Fox and Sheridan, and even Webster, he had this divine gift linked with many weaknesses. His life was irregular and ill-ordered. From the transcendent heights to which he rose In the flights of his eloquence, he fell very low in periods of relaxation and idleness.
        He reminds one of another gifted American, Edgar Allen Poe, and like Poe, he had the gift of song. At least one of his poems is not unworthy of the genius of any poet our country has produced.
        Haskell shared the fate of many other men of genius who have been called to deal with practical affairs. His nature was too sensitive, his nerves too highly strung for rough contact with men, for the struggles that they incessantly make for place and power.
        Once, in 1847, he was elected to Congress, but found the service uncongenial and refused a re-election.
        The excessive nervous strain to which Haskell subjected himself in every set speech that he made, combined with the irregularities of his life, finally subverted his nervous system, and the people of Tennessee beheld with universal regret the sad spectacle of this wonderful man paying the price of his marvelous gifts and triumphs, by confinement in a madhouse. It was in an interval of restored reason that he wrote the beautiful poem mentioned above.
        His mind never recovered its balance. He died at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, March 12, 1859.
        His life was the most brilliant and yet the saddest in the history of our State, exhibiting a resplendent genius hampered by a fatal infirmity of will. No censure of him ever passes the lips of a Tennesseean, but every word is praise, and every sentiment sympathy.

 

An acknowledged fine portrait of Colonel Haskell hangs in the hallway outside the director's office on the second floor of the Tenn. State Library & Archives Bldg., Nashville, Tennessee. He is depicted as an attractive bewhiskered face. radiating real intelligence, but as I viewed the eyes of that image I couldn't help but think how infinitely sad the expression is in them! This portrait is listed as Tennessee State Museum artifact #76.44. This portrait of Colonel Haskell has been attributed to William S. Shackelford or R. A. Paulding. Letter, Mr. S. D. Cox, ADC, the Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, Tenn. to Jonathan Smith, Jackson, April 15, 1992.

 

(Page 13)

HAWKINS LOT, NO. 273

GILES HAWKINS
Born in Lenoir Co., N.C.
Jan. 20, 1801
Died
June 19, 1669

W. B. HAWKINS
Born
June 22. 1828
Died
Oct. 2, 1861

SARAH
Wife of
Giles HAWKINS
Born in Lenoir Co. N.C.
Nov. 1807
Died Feb. 2, 1673
(No day of birth yes incised on this tombstone.)

Sarah (Sallie) Hawkins' LWT was proven Feb. 1873. (Madison Co. Will Book A, page 155) The WHIG AND TRIBUNE, Feb. 8, 1873, states that Sallie, widow of Giles Hawkins, died Feb. 1, 1873, in her 70th yr.

 

W. McCUTCHEN LOT, NO. 244B

WM. McCUTCHEN
Born Sept. (9?), 1793
Died July 16, 1661

MATILDA COLLINS
Wife of
Wm. McCUTCHEN
Born Mar. 1. 1791
Died Sept. 23, 1868

"In Memory of Our Father and Mother"

 

A. DEBERRY LOT, NO. 184

TRIBUNE AND SUN, Jackson, July 20, 1877. Allen Deberry, son of Mathias and Elizabeth Deberry, born July 10, 1831 and died at home July 14, 1877. Born 4 miles east of Jackson.

ALLEN DEBERRY
Born July 1831
Died July 1877

ANNIE TARVER
Wife of
ALLEN DEBERRY
May 3, 1832-Apr. 14, 1915

 

STODDERT LOT, NO. 343

To the Memory of
MARGARETA ROBB
who died July 30th 1834,
Aged 1 year, 2 months & 12 days

 

BRIGHT LOT, NO. 188

One of the loveliest tombstones in Riverside, fashioned by Rosebrough Sons, St. Louis, Mo. has almost totally unreadable name/vital stats panels but one can read that the left panel reads SARAH SELLS, wife of Rev. J. E. BRIGHT. The right panel reads JOHNSTON EATON BRIGHT.

The TRIBUNE AND SUN, Jackson, Sept. 27, 1878, records death of Sarah Belle, wife of Rev. J. E. Bright, vho died Sept. 20, 1876; "Her paintings adorn many of the happiest & most refined homes in Jackson." IBID., October 25, 1876, ditto for Rev. J. E. BRIGHT, who died in Jackson, Oct. 21, 1876, aged about 75 years.

On the back of each ones panel (towards east) are inscribed information about each. Under "Mother", SBB, the fact that she was a graduate of Lane Seminary. Cincinnati, Ohio, teacher of music and painting; that she was married March 27, 1834 to Rev. J. E. Bright. On the back of his panel, under "Father", it is noted that JEB was a graduate of Miami University, Oxford, Ohio; educator; president of several institutions, including the Female Institute at Brownsville. Tenn.; Minden Female College, Minden, La., Presbyterian Female College, Jackson, Tenn.; that he had been an ordained Presbyterian minister.

In the 1850 Cens., Hayvood Co., Tenn. it is recorded that J. E. Bright, age 42, was born in Va. ; Sarah Brlght, age 35, was born in Ohio.

 

McCLANAHAN LOT
South of 8th Street
[Lots 412-414 in Tombstone Inscriptions]

Sacred to the memory of
JOHN CLARK COCHRAN
who vas born in Abbeville
District, South Carolina, on
the 12th day of July 1826 and
departed this life in Jackson,
Tenn., on the 16th day of February
1849.
He remembered his Creator in the days of his youth and now he rests from his labors.

This man was a veteran of the Mexican War.

 

GLASS AND OTHERS LOT, NO. 221
[Lot 221, south in Tombstone Inscriptions

MRS. JANE C.
consort of
J. W. GLASS
Departed this life 21
Day of October 1867
Aged 40 Years

 

CARTMELL LOT, NO. 330

A large, ornate tombstone:
MARTIN CARTMELL
Born
Nov. 2, 1797
Died
July 4, 1864
It is a faithful saying
For if we be dead with Him,
We shall also live with Him.

JEMIMA A. SHARP
Wife of Martin CARTMELL
Born Feb. 13, 1809
Died Dec. 26, 1891
Precious in the sight of the Lord
is the death of his saints.

This tombstone was erected Dec. 1891.

Robert H. Cartmell's Diary, volume 3, page 77, July 4, 1864. "Pa died at half past 11 o'clock this morning. I was with him the last 2 days & nights . . . his sufferings have been great." Page 76, "Pa was born in Frederick County, Va. 2d day of November, 1797. his mother & step father moved to Wilson Co. Tenn. when he was 10 or 12 years of age. He moved to this county I think in 1822 and has lived here ever since. He joined the Presbyterian Church while old Dr. Campbell was its pastor in 1842 or 3. He was never noisy in anything. . . . Of course, he, as we all, had his faults & failings."

 

CALDWELL LOT, NO. 178
[Lot 178 in Tombstone Inscriptions]

WILLIAM ADDISON CALDWELL
Born
Greensboro, N.C.
Oct. 1st 1817
Died
Jackson, Tenn.
March 10. 1886

Caldwell moved to Jackson, 1872; Cashier of First National Bank of Jackson.

 

S. R. HUBBARD LOT, NO. 256
[Lot 256 in Tombstone Inscriptions]

In Loving Remembrance
JOSEPHINE N.
Wife of
Dr. S. R. HUBBARD
Born
Mar. 16, 1851
Died
June 20, 1888
Blessed are the Dead.

1880 Census, Madison Co., page 854: living on Talbot St., Jackson: S. R. Hubbard, 44, phys; Josie M. Hubbard, 26, born Alabama; several children. Also in household: Benj. H. Hubbard, 25, Alabama; brother of S. R. H.

 

(Page 14)

YANCEY LOT, NO. 288

F. W. YANCEY
Born
in Halifax County
June 15, 1819
Died
September 11, 1871

WHIG AND TRIBUNE, Jackson, Sept. 16, 1871. Died. Fred. W. Yancy, on Sept. 13, age 52. Born Halifax Co., Va., married Susan Beveridge, Jan. 18, 1844

 

O'CONNOR LOT, NO. 229

Sacred
to the memory of
JAMES V. SWAYNE
Born Nov. 6, 182l
Died Mar. 11, 1856

 

TURLEY LOT, NO. 407B

WILLIAM PAYNE TURLEY
Born the 11th day of February 1826.
Died the 12th day of July 1846.
He was the only son of his parents.

This tombstone is a rectangular stone slab, flush with the ground. The NASHVILLE WHIG, July 21, 1846, mentions that this young man had recently died and that he was a son of William B. Turley.

William Bruce Turley was born in Alexandria, Va., 1800; he came with parents as a child to Davidson Co., Tenn., educated to practice law; became prominent as a lawyer; served on the Supreme Court of Tennessee, 1835-1850. (See, SKETCHES OF THE BENCH AND BAR OF TENNESSEE, by J. V. Caldwell, 1898, pages 150-152 for facts about him.) In Shelby County, he was injured in a freak accident and died May 28, 1851, according to his tombstone inscription in Winchester cemetery in Memphis, which cemetery was obliterated and its stones destroyed in the early 1930s. His wife, Ann C. Turley, died in November 1859, of cancer, in Madison Co., aged about 51; native of Kentucky. (Tenn. Mortality Schedule, 1860, page 357) She is almost certainly buried near her only son. Also buried with stones bearing no dates, are her daughter, Mary E. Turley and her husband, Thomas W. Harris, who were married in March 1862. Another daughter, Irene Turley, md. James Coburn, Feb. 25, 1857.

 

LUCKEY LOT, NO. 205

SAMUEL LUCKEY
Born
In Iredell Co. N. Carolina
Oct. 23, 1801
Died
In Jackson, Tenn.
March 8, 1870

MRS. H. P. LUCKEY
Wife of
Samuel Luckey
Born
In Granville Co. N. C.
April 5, 1815
Died in Jackson, Tenn.
January 5, 1888

Madison Co. Will Bk. A, page 101, has Samuel Luckey's LWT proven April 1870; he and wife had no children, evidently, but he left his estate to his wife, H. P. L., and his natural daughter, Caroline Goodrich, wife of Stephen B. Goodrich. LWT of Holland Pope Luckey, proven June 1888. (Ibid., page 303) Caroline Luckey md. S. B. Goodrich, July 1856, remd Wm. A. Barnhill, January 1871; there were children of her first marriage.

 

W. W. GATES LOT, NO. 269

W. W GATES
1812-1891

ANN M. GATES
1821-1911

THE WHIG AND TRIBUNE, Jackson, May 8, 1875:

        Tthe Nestor of the Tennessee press, WILLIAM WARD GATES, is now the oldest editor in the state. He was born in Chesterfield County, Virginia, on the 23rd day of May, 1812. His grandfather and six brothers came from England in 1755 and settled near Petersburg, Virginia. All of them enlisted and three were killed in the Revolutionary War. His father participated in the War of 1812 and was present at the memorable burning of the Richmond Theatre. The subject of our sketch removed with his parents at an early day to West Tennessee, and at the age of 14, entered a printing office as apprentice at Paris, Henry county, the office being conducted by Felix K. Zollicoffer and Amos R. Johnson.
        At the age of 19, Mr. Gates commenced the publication of the WEST TENNESSEAN in Paris and displayed at its mast-head the name of Henry Clay for President.
        From Paris he removed his paper to Huntingdon and from thence to Jackson in 1843. At the latter place, in connection with P. C. McCowat he started a new paper. THE WEST TENNESSEE WHIG.
        No other person has done more to build up Jackson than Colonel G. Colonel Gates has raised and educated a large family and his sons are actively identified with the business of Jackson.

 

TOTTEN AND OTHERS LOT, NO. 303

Archibald W. O. Totten was a prominent lawyer of Jackson; served on the state Supreme Court, 1850-1855. A native of Middle Tennessee, he came when young to Gibson County. (SKETCHES OF THE BENCH AND BAR OF TENNESSEE, by Joshua V. Galdwell, Knoxville, 1898, pages 154-155) He was married to Harriet C. Hurt in Madison Co., about March 29, 1843. She died years before he did. The 1860 census of Madison Co. (June 9), page 221: A. W. O. Totten, 37, Tenn, Eugene Totten, 16, Alice Totten, 14; Caroline Totten, 10. Totten executed his LWT, July 1867. which was proven August thereafter. His son died young. Caroline, Callie, married Baker Springfield, November 24, 1869 and died Sept. 15, 1871 and was buried with her infant son (WHIG AND ThIBUNE, Jackson, Sept. 23. 1871)

The daughter, Miss Alice Totten, died in Jackson, April 28, 1873, in her 27th year. All her family was gone; Hers was a lonely life. . . . (WHIG AND TRIBUNE., May 3, 1873) She is the only one of this family circle with a tombstone on this lot.

 

(Page 15)

THEUS LOT, NO. 389A

ELIZA LOVE THEUS
Born in Charlestom, S.C.
Sept 9, 1792
Died in Jackson, Tenn.
Aug. 14, 1868

In her LWT (dated July 23, 1868; proven Sept. 1868), Eliza L. Theus left a special bequest to three of her grandsons. William Campbell, son of Mariah Theus; Wm. Randolph, son of Henry Theus; Wm. Randolph, son of Francis D. Theus, "For the special reason that they bear the name of my deceased husband, their grandfather." She was generous with her family and the local Baptist Church. (Madison County Will Book A, page 76)

 

THE JACKSON SUN, March 12, 1944, p. 16:

A Memorial Window In First Baptist Church Here
by Rev. Campbell Symonds

        One of the memorial windows in the First Baptist Church of Jackson, Tennessee, is in memory of Mrs. William Randolph Theus who was before her marriage Eliza Love Lenud.
        Her ancestry traced to Jacques Leger, born in St. Quentin, France, and his wife Elizabeth Bossu.
        Their son was Pierre Leger who about 1680 left France with Marie, his wife, for England where in 1694 they were members of the French Protestant Church in London. In 1709 they came to America and were given a grant of land in Craven County, South Carolina.
        The son of Pierre Leger and Marie, his wife, was Peter Leger, born about 1700. On Oct. 31, 1730 he married Mary Evans. Peter Leger died about Jan. 1, 1762 and his will was proved Jan. 15, 1762 in Charleston, S.C.
        The child first mentioned in this will was Elizabeth Leger. She was born in the 1730s and on Feb. 14, 1765 was married to George Croft. Francis Marion was a devoted friend of George Croft and in "The Life of Gen. Francis Marrion" by Brig. Gen. P. Horry of Marion's Brigade this friendship for George Croft and his wife is described.
        After George Croft's death, his widow, Mts. Elizabeth Leger Croft was married on June 13, 1782 to Captain Henry Lenud, captain of cavalry in Col. Horry's regiment.
        From this union, Eliza Love Lenud was born. She was baptized Feb. 15, 1790, according to the record in St. Phillip's register. After the death of her parents, Eliza Love Lenud and her brother, Henry, were placed under the guardianship of Francis Deliesseline, a lawyer who was very kind to them. When old enough to begin her education, she was placed in a French Board school where she was strictly reared and fitted for the highest society of Charleston. She was a brilliant and beautiful girl of decided French appearance and manners. When sixteen, without her guardian's consent, she was married by Bishop Bowen on Thursday evening, Oct. 30, 1806, in Charleston to Professor William Randolp Theus, one of the Instructors in the school.
        Shortly after their marriage, Eliza Love Lenud Theus, who was very wealthy, and her husband, William Randolph Theus, purchased a beautiful home with liveried servants and other surroundings in keeping, lived elegantly in the city of Charleston.
        After Professor William Randolph Theus' death, April 29, 1827, in Georgtown, S.C., Mrs. Theus, being a woman of considerable determination independence and resourcefulness, disposed of her holdings in South Carolina, and with her children and negro slaves, moved westward to Madison County, Tennessee. Here she purchased land and built a home between Denmark and Jackson which she called Sedgeland.
        As Jackson grew she purchased property and erected a home near the City Library on what is now College Street, between Cumberland Ave. and Church Street. This became her winter residence and Sedgeland her summer home.
        She was a member of the First Baptist Church of Jackson and during the later years of her life sat in a rocking chair near the pulpit so she could hear, nodding and swilling when she approved of what was being said and shaking her head vehemently when she disagreed. For a long time after her death her chair remained in its accustomed place.
        She was called to her heavenly reward from the home of her son-in-law, Dr. James Green Womack, in Jackson, on August 14, 1868. Her will recorded in Will Book A, page 16 says: "4th. I give and bequeath to Joel R. Chappell and John Glau three thousand dollars in trust, and for the sole purpose of buying or building a permanent Parsonage, for the Baptist Church now worshiping in Jackson." This home was erected next to the church and torn down to make room for the Sunday school portion of the church now standing.
        In the history of the church the following was written, "Mrs. Eliza Theus was an ardent spirit in everything in which she had an interest. She was a devoted friend, a devout Baptist, a faithful Christian, a liberal contributor to all church purposes, refined in feeling and noble ideals. She bequethed in her will money with which to build the parsonage for this church which was received after a long legal contest. She is held in sacred memory by the members of this church." In attestation to this fact one of the memorial windows bears this inscription:
        A MEMORIAL to Mrs. Eliza Theus. A mother in Israel.
        Mrs. Theus' daughter, Maria Croft Theus was married at Sedgeland to Francis Watkins Campbell, M.D., whose son, Francis Watkins Campbell, Jr., was the father of Thomas Chalmers Campbell of Rochester, New York, and Mrs. Elizabeth Campbell Symonds of East Baltimore Street.

More information on window in Scrapbook II.

 

In "Family Findings," publication of the Mid-West Tennessee Genealogical Society, volume 10, #1, January 1976, from the genealogical data furnished in the Bible (pub. 1832) of Erasmus S. Campbell, owned in 1976 by Hiss Marguerite Doling of Humboldt, Tennessee, are these data: William Randolph Theus was born in Georgetown, S.C., December 22, 1780 and died April 28, 1827. He married Eliza Love Linud, in Charlestovn, S.C., Oct. 31, 1806. She was born in Charlestovn. S.C., Sept. 25, 1790 and their daughter, Ann Deleipeline Theus, was born March 19, 1817; married Erasmus S. Campbell, November 10, 1835; listed are some four of their children; and she died in February 1842.

Buried in the THEUS family lot, with tombstone: ANN DELEIPELINE, Consort of E. S. CAMPBELL MD. Born Mar. 17, 1817; Died Feb. 7, 1842. (This stone has fallen.)

This Stone
is raised to the memory of
EDWARD CROFT THEUS
By his Mother
Died Jan. 19, 1846,
21 years, 10 months & 1 day

 

JOHN CHESTER AND OTHERS LOT, NO. 268

DR. JOHN CHESTER
Born
May 16, 1827
Died
June 4, 1877

THE JACKSON SUN, June 8, 1877. Died. John K. Chester; born on the hill north of Jackson, May 1827, son of R. I. Chester and Elizabeth Hays Chester. Graduate, 1846. West Tenn. College (forerunner of Union University, Jackson); md. Apphia Taylor. Served in the Civil War. Died June 4, 1877, after contracting smallpox from a small child he had attended. Numerous printed expressions of great respect for this physician-man.

APPHIA A.
Beloved Wife of
Dr. John CHESTER
Born
July 10, 1829
Died
Mar. 20, 1881
"He giveth His
Beloved Sleep"

 

YOUNG LOT, NO. 222A

One monument:
MARY J.
Wife of
John YOUNG
Born
Jan. 22. 1825
(no death date)
JOHN YOUNG
born
Dec . 28, 1823
Died
Sept. 20, 1884

LOUISA J.
YOUNG
Dau. of J. & M. J.
YOUNG
Born April 29, 1855
Died ? ?, 1881

Note: among the Young children were Alice, Louisa, Martha, John and Mary.

ALICE M.
Wife of John M. Mann
Born ? ?, 1886
Died ? ? ?

Next to her tombstone, to the north, is a small stone for apparently a daughter of the Mann couple; unreadable.

 

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