Lawrence County
Goodspeed's History of Tennessee

TNGenWeb Project
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Information typed by Reita Jones Burress
Page Created by Jane N. Powell, September 10, 1998.

Notice: Not having a hard copy to proof read, errors will probably occur in the following document. Reita and I will correct them to the original Goodspeed from time to time. Thank you for your patience.


Alford, James M. was born in Tennessee in 1822. Son of Isaac W. and Mary P. (Edminston) Alford. The father was a North Carolinian by birth, and was an early immigrant of Tennessee. He was a farmer and merchant, and held the office of trustee for ten years. He was a follower of the Democratic party and died in Lawrence County in 1859. His wife died in 1876. James M. clerked in his father's store until twenty-five years of age, and closed out the stock at the latter's death, and also settled up the estate. In 1858 he wedded Martha F. Childress of Tennessee, born 1838, daughter of Adian D. and Nancy (McGuire) Childress. The following are the children born to this union of Mr. and Mrs. Alford: Emma C., William R., (deceased), Joseph H., Charles A., Edward C. (deceased), George T. (deceased), Joseph H., and Maggie S. Mrs. Alford died May 25, 1886. In 1862 Mr. Alford enlisted in Company D, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry Confederate States Army, as a private, and was elected orderly sergeant and served faithfully until the close of the conflict. Since his return in 1865 he has farmed and worked at the carpenter trade. In 1868 he was elected circuit court clerk, holding the office until 1870, when he resigned and opened a general merchandise establishment at the noted watering-place, Wayland Springs. He also carries on farming and is a stanch Democrat in politics, and a member of the Masonic fraternity. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, as was his wife previous to her death.

Buchanan, Demosthenes is a native of Giles County, Tenn., born February 23, 1840, son of Samuel G. and Sarah E. (Bodenhammer) Buchanan, both of whom were born in Tennessee. The father was one of the family of John Buchanan, who was one of the early settlers of Lawrence County, and a member of the State Legislature a number of terms. The father was prosperous farmer and secures a comfortable competency. His death occurred in May, 1853. The mother yet resides in Giles County. Our subject secured a good common school education, and at the age of twenty-one enlisted in Company D., Third Tennessee Regiment, and served as high private. He was wounded at Fort Donelson, and after residing at home until his wound healed, he, in 1862, joined Company G, Forty-eighth Tennessee Regiment Tennessee Regiment, and served until October of that year, when was again wounded, for which he was discharged the following August. He farmed in Giles County until 1871, at which time he purchased his present place and has been engaged in farming and stock raising up to the present time. Mr. Buchanan is a Democrat and has been magistrate of the Tenth District a number of years. Alonza L., Solon, Walter, Franklin, Samuel, John and a little girl deceased are the children born to his marriage with Mary J. Quarles, which took place June 17, 1864. Mrs. Buchanan is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

Busby, William M. may be mentioned as a prominent and successful planter of Lawrence County, Tenn. He was born near Lawrenceburg October 15, 1827, the youngest of five children. His father was born and reared in North Carolina, and after his marriage to a Miss Hale moved to Tennessee. After her death he wedded Verlinda Thomas, daughter of Samuel Thomas, who was born near London, England, about 1758, and came to the Untied States prior to the Revolutionary war. He served in that conflict and participated in the Battle of Bunker Hill. Our Subject's mother, Miss (Thomas) Busby, was born in the Bluegrass State March 30, 1797, and is still living at the advanced age of ninety years. William M. was married in Lawrence County July 27, 1854, to N.C. Springer, daughter of Jacob and granddaughter of Aaron Springer. Mr. and Mrs. Busby's children are as follows: Sallie J., (Mrs. W.C. Smith), James F., Stephen J., Samuel T., William A., Paul Jones, John S. and George H. Their mother was born in Lawrence County May 25, 1822, and died at her home July 28, 1882. Mr. Busby is a tiller of the soil, and is the owner of 310 acres of land. He gives considerable attention to stock raising, and is an extensive raiser of the cereals. He is a Democrat in politics, and, although not a member of any church, is prominently identified with all enterprises for the public good.

Campbell, Hugh A. was born in Maury Co., Tenn., in 1850, and is the son of Richard and Adelia (McMackin) Campbell, who were Tennesseans by birth. The father was a fairly successful tiller of the soil, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church south, and at resent are residing in the village of Chinnabee. Our subject was united in marriage, in 1870, to Miss Lou Voss, who was born in this State in 1849, and is a daughter of Levi and Sarah Voss. Hugh A.'s early days were spent on his father's farm, and there he resided until he attained his majority, when he farmed three years for himself, and then worked alternately at the carpenter's trade, blacksmithing and wagonmaking in Chinnabee. His residence is located on a seven-acres lot near the village. He and Mrs. Campbell are worthy members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in politics he has always given his support to the Democratic party, and is also a strong supporter of prohibition.

Cannon, Francis M. was born near Wayland Spring, Lawrence Co., Tenn., September 24, 1837, son of James M. and Temperance (Thomas) Cannon. His early educational advantages were very limited, but by close observation and contact with business life he has acquired a good education. He begun farming for himself at the age of fifteen and continued that calling up to the age of twenty-three years. He then married Carrie E. True, daughter of Shiloh and Sarah A. (Slayden) True, and eight children blessed this union: William E., born February 17, 1865; James E., born December 9, 1866; Thomas F., born December 8, 1868; Geneva H., born November 12, 1870; Shilol T., born December 19, 1872; Emma C., born September 30, 1876; John C., born November 25, 1878; and Mary E., born November 18, 1882. Mr. Cannon was elected circuit court clerk in 1870, which office he faithfully filled the greater part of the time up to 1882. He continued to reside in the town of Lawrenceburg until April 9, 1885, when he removed to his farm of 120 acres near Lawrenceburg. Besides this he owns several thousand acres in another part of the county. In politics he is a Democrat. His parents, James and Temperance Cannon, were born in Virginia August 16, 1816, and Alabama in 1818, respectively. The father came to Tennessee when quite young, and there resided until 1857, when he took up a abode near Florence, Ala, where he died in 1877. The mother is at present residing in Lawrence County, Tenn.

Carrell, Matthew F. is the sixth of twelve children born to the marriage of Stephen A. and Mary Frances (Stribling) Carrell, and is of Irish descent. He was born at Lawrenceburg October 3, 1853, and there acquired his education in Jackson Academy. In early life he was a school-teacher, but has followed farming as his chief occupation. He was married, March 4, 1879, to Julia A. Simms, daughter of Paris L. and Mary E. (McGlamry) Simms. The father was a farmer of the Tenth District and the father of twelve children. Mrs. Carrell was born May 22, 1863, in Lawrence County, and is the mother of two children: Mary L. born in 1880, and Paris A., born in 1882. Mr. Carrell is a Democrat and a man of intelligence and liberality. His farm of 160 acres is devoted to the production of the cereals principally, but stock and cotton are also raised. His father was born in Lawrence County and is one of its wealthy farmers, being the owner of six farms, which amount to about 3,000 acres. He has served in official capacities nearly all his life, and has been clerk of the county for thirteen years, and judge of the same. He was a representative in the State Legislature in 1853, and is one of the highly respected and honored citizens of the county. The mother was born in Lawrence County, and, although in her sixty-third year, enjoys remarkably good health.

Choate, T. J. was born the 27th of February, 1831, in Maury County, Tenn., son of Richard and Martha (McMackin) Choate, who came from East Tennessee to Maury County at an early day. Both parents are deceased. Our subject was reared in Lawrence County and received limited early education in his childhood days. Since that he has gained a fair education by careful observation and study. After attaining his majority he began doing for himself, working as mechanic, and now owns what is known as the Fall River Wool Factory, which he successfully operates. In connection with this he owns and farms 242 acres of land. He was elected magistrate in 1882, and still serves in that capacity. He is a Democrat, and a member in good standing in the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1856 he took for his companion through life Eliza J. Morgan, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Bird) Morgan, and their union was blessed in the birth of eight children: Mary Ellen, Charles A., John Rufus, Nancy, Daniel R., Ella T., James T. and Andrew Lee. Mary Ellen deceased. Cocke, William C. is a son of Peter P. and Alice (Hooe) Cocke. The father was born in Westmoreland County, Va., and died in Ohio in 1850. Mrs. Cocke was born in Price William County, Va. ,and also died in the Buckeye State in 1872. William C., our subject, was born June 18, 1814, and was reared in his native State. Virginia. When eighteen years of age he began farming for himself, and in 1836 immigrated to Ohio, where he remained until 1881 and then he came to Lawrence County, Tenn., where he still resides. His farm consists of 478 acres of choice land. March 22, 1838, he was untied in marriage to Lucy Ann Hines, daughter of John and Hester Hines. These children were born to their union: Wade W., Albert H., Peter P., Taylor F., Walker A., Jackson M., George W., John C., Thornton H., Adaline F., Frances, Maria L., and Mary D. Mr. Cocke is a Jacksonian Democrat, and, so far as his means will allow, has always been a liberal contributor to all laudable enterprises. He was on the first passenger train ever run in the United States, extending from Harper's Ferry to Baltimore, Md., in 1832. Cornell, Fred W. was born in Michigan on the 27th of September, 1858, son of Robert and Margaret (DeLaney) Cornell, who were born in New York State. The father removed to Michigan about 1840, and there farmed until 1851, when he went to California via Chicago, Mississippi River and the Isthmus of Darien, and engaged in mining and gardening for two years at Placerville. He then returned home, and in 1856 purchased a farm in Kent County, Mich., where he resided until 1878, then came to Lawrence County, Tenn., and purchased 1,000 acres of land, on which he lived for three years. In 1862 he returned to Michigan and there now resides on a farm. His wife died September 6, 1866. Their son, Fred W .Cornell, resided with his parents on a farm until twenty-one years of age, when he engaged in mercantile business in Michigan, but came to Tennessee in 1881, and here has since made his home. In April, 1885, he established his present hotel and controls the leading trade in this line in the town. June 18, 1884, he Alice Ribble were united in marriage. She was born in Indiana. Mr. Cornall and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a Republican in politics. He is a prominent business man of Lawrence County and is recognized as a moral, upright citizen.

Couch, John A., son of Thomas and Charity Couch, was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., December 19, 1848. The father came to Tennessee in 1865, and settled on a farm. He died in 1875, and his wife in 1883. John a. resided with his father on the farm until twenty years of age, when he became the architect of his own fortunes and chose the free and independent life of a farmer as his calling through life. He settled on and tilled a portion of his father's farm, consisting of 160 acres of very good land. His farms contain considerable ore and is well adapted to raising the different cereals and cotton. He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church South in 1879, and has always voted the Democratic ticket. In 1868 he and Mary J. Cobb were untied in marriage. She was born in Alabama, in 1850, and is the daughter of James and Mary J. Cobb. To their union were born five children: Manda E., Emily C., Mary E., William A., and Charles E. Craig, James, a native of Maury County, was born October 25, 1822, son of Johnson and Martha (Blackwood) Craig, both native of Orange County, N.C. His father came to Maury County in 1808, ans was a mechanic by trade. He farmed and raised stock also, ans was an intelligent man and a useful citizen. His death occurred in October , 1848, his age being seventy-six years. His wife died in 1856. James was reared on the farm with limited education, and when twenty-two years old began farming for himself, and has continued thus until the present. For a short time he lived in Lewis County. In July 1844, he wedded Miss Melissa Voorhies, who bore him ten children: Johnson, Sidney, Emily, Elizabeth, Anna, Millard, Mattie, Joseph, Willie, and Walter. Mr. Craig is a Democrat and was clerk of the Lewis County Circuit Court in the seventies, and also served several years as magistrate. He is a Mason, and himself and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is one of the most substantial citizens of the county. His son, Millard, is the proprietor of a general store at Summertown, having established his business in 1884. He keeps a fine stock and has a good and growing trade. He is one of the most enterprising and promising young business men in the county.

Crew, Jonas, who was born on the 22nd of September, 1821, in Person County, N.C., is a son of Arthur and Louvisa (Hicks ) Crews, both of whom were born in the same State and county as our subject, in 1799 and 1801, respectively. The father immigrated to Lawrence County, Tenn., on Christmas Eve, 1831, and died in that county 1862, his wife dying March of 1882. Our subject was reared in Lawrence County, and had few opportunities for gaining an education, but in later years has gained a good business education. He begun the battle of life for himself after attaining his majority, and engaged in farming and stock raising, being very successful in the latter occupation. He owns about 1,800 acres of land, about 700 of which is under fence. On the 25th of September, 1844, he was married to Mary Virginia Hensley, daughter of Simeon and Charity (Bryant) Hensley. The father died and Mrs. Crews was quite young, and his widow married a Mr. Taylor and moved from Lawrence County, since which time nothing has been heard as to her whereabouts. To our subject and his wife were born the following family: William James, born May 18, 1847, and died in July, 1865: Arter Simeon, born May 1, 1849. Mrs. Crews died June 3, 1849, and June 3, 1859, Mr. Crews married Eliza Emeline Helton, and their children are Melvina Catherine, born July 20, 1861: George Washington , born May 29, 1863: Zachariah F., born June 20, 1866: Jeremiah Benjamin, born August 11, 1869; Louvisa Amanda, born July 11, 1871, and died September, 1882; Jonas, born September 27, 1873; Jonathan McClane, born August 11, 1876; Henry Clay, born May 29, 1879; and Daniel Wewbster born October 15, 1881. Mr. Crews was not in the late war. In 1852 he was elected justice of the peace, and served six years. In 1882 he was re-elected of the same office. He was formerly a member of the Methodist Church, and still retains his religious views.

Deavenport, Capt. Thomas D. was born in Lawrence County September 18,1837, son of Thomas D. and Maria P. (Lucas) Deavenport. The father, when a boy, came from Virginia to Tennessee about 1810, his father being Matthew Deavenport. They settled in Giles County, where Matthew Deavenport was a prominent Baptist divine. About 1821 our subject's father moved to Lawrence County, where he farmed, sold goods, manufactured cotton and worked at the brick mason's trade. he was a Jeffersonian Democrat and an influential citizen. He represented his county in the State Legislature during the forties. His death occurred in 1844, and his widow's in 1862. Capt. Thomas D. Deavenport was reared on his father's farm, and completed his education at Jackson College, Columbia, but left school one session before graduation, owing to his father's death. He soon went to Kansas, where he remained during his difficulties in the State over question of squatter sovereignty. He assisted in the Government surveys there. In 1857 he returned to Tennessee, locating in Hardin County, where he began clerking in a mercantile establishment. Later in the same year he began studying law under John S. Kennedy, at Florence, Ala. In 1858 he taught school in Lawrenceburg, continuing his legal studies, and was that year admitted to the bar, and soon began his legal practicing. In 1861 he assisted in organizing Capt. W. P. Moore's company of the Thirty-second Regiment, and was made lieutenant, and upon the reorganization of the regiment was promoted to the captaincy. More than once on the field he was in command of his regiment, notably at Jonesboro, Ga., where he was shot through the lungs by a minie-ball. This incapacitated him for further service. After the war he resumed his practice, and has thus continued since. Capt. Deavenport is an uncompromising Democrat. In 1870 he was a member of the Constitutional Convention, and in 1877 served with distinction in the State Senate. In 1858 he married Miss Amanda Finch, who died in 1863. By this marriage he has three daughters: Martha M., Jennie L., and Mannie F. In 1875 Mr. Deavenport married Mrs. Zuba (Dustin) Fillmore, who has presented her husband with sons: Thomas E. and William H.. Capt. Deavenport is a Mason and a adherent of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His wife is an Episcopalian.

Dobbins, Alexander T. (deceased) was born in Limstone County, Ala., September 15, 1815, and was a prominent and successful planter. He was one of three children of David and Martha Dobbins, who were born in North Carolina, and after their marriage moved to Alabama, where they resided a few years. They then came to Tennessee, and here our subject acquired such education as could be obtained at that early period. He at one time owned and managed three mercantile houses, one in Center Star, Ala., one in Lexington, Ala., and one at his home of Appleton, Tenn., and his business career was marked with wonderful success. He dealt extensively in stock, besides superintending his extensive plantation. He was a man of generous and benevolent disposition and contributed liberally to all enterprises for the public weal. He was never under the influence of intoxicating liquor, nor indulged in the use of tobacco or profane language. He died of cancer, July 30, 1884. He was three times married. His first wife, Zilpha McMasters, bore him five children, four of whom are living: James P., John J., Favor A., and Elizabeth Calladonia. Their mother was born April 19, 1824, and died December 15, 1856. In 1859 Mr. Dobbins married Nancy C. Cox and five children were born to them: Zilpha M. (Widow of William Couch), George W., William P., Martha Camilla and Robert T. Mrs. Dobbins was born July 14, 1828, and died October 28, 1870. November 7, 1871, Mrs. Mary J. (Hammond) Powell became his wife. She was born in Lawrence County April 22, 1833 [for biography of her family see sketch of G. W. Hammond], and resides on a fine farm of 525 acres, and is assisted by her step-sons in raising the cereals and live stock.

Dunn, Thomas, a well known and prosperous business man of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., was born in Louisville, Ky., January, 1841, and is a son of James and Maria (Sculy) Dunn, both natives of Ireland. Our subject was reared and educated in the city of Louisville. When but nineteen years of age he began the mercantile life as a clerk, and so continued until the war broke out. He enlisted as a private in Company A, Louisville Legion, at the beginning of the war, and served three years in the Federal Army as a soldier, when he was mustered out and accepted the post of soldiership in the federal forces at Pulaski, Tenn. May, 1865, he came to Lawrenceburg and engaged in the general merchandising business with Mr. W. H. Dustin, with whom he has remained ever since. The firm, having met with more than ordinary success, carries the largest stock of general merchandise goods in the county, and controls the leading trade in this line in the town and county. The firm extended the scope of their business and engaged rather extensively in the cotton trade, conducting the Eagle and also Crescent cotton factories in the county. In 1873 Mr. Dunn married Sarah T. Sykes, a native of Lawrence County, Tenn., and the fruits of this union were four children. Our subject is strictly independent in politics, and a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

Dustin, William H., a native of Louisville, Ky., was born July 1, 1848, and is the son of Eli and Ellen Dustin, natives of Kentucky. Our subject received a liberal education in Louisville, and in early life was engaged as clerk by James Ridgeford & Co., of that city, where he remained until 1862, after which he entered the army as clerk of a sutler, and was thus engaged until the close of the war. At that time he moved to Lawrenceburg, Tenn., and engaged in the dry goods, general merchandise and cotton manufacturing business, at which he is still engaged. The firm is known as W.H. Dustin & Co., and Dustin & Dunn. They are the proprietors of both Eagle and Crescent cotton-mills. Mr. Dustin is also president of the Shoal Mills Manufacturing Company, in Lawrence County. He has been a very successful man in all his undertakings. He is considered a prosperous and accurate business man, and a good citizen. In 1867 he married Maggie Skyes, daughter of James and Eliza Sykes, natives of England and Connecticut, respectively. To our subject and wife were born two children: Gertrude E. and Willis S. Our subject is a Democrat in politics, a member of the F & A.M., and also a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Fleeman, J.W. is a Giles County, Tennessean, born in 1836, son of William and Nancy (Leath) Fleeman, who were Tennesseans by birth and among the early settlers of Giles County. Our subject was reared in his native county and received quite a limited early education. This, however, he greatly improved in later years. When about twenty-one he began farming for himself, and had followed that occupation very successfully to the present time. He owns 100 acres of good farming land near Lawrenceburg. He joined the Federal Army September 21, 1864, and was in Company I. Fourth Tennessee Mounted Infantry, being elected first Sergeant of the company, and was on guard duty most of the time. He was honorably discharged August 25, 1865. In 1870 he was elected magistrate and has since held the office, his present term expiring in 1888. He is a Republican politically, and a member in good standing in the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1857 he was married to Elizabeth J. Bishop, daughter of Reden and Elizabeth (Price) Bishop. To Mr. and Mrs. Fleeman were born the following family: James William (deceased), James R. Mary Lure, Wiley Perry, Sarah E., Etta E., John T., Ernest T., Katie W. and Mattie Liou.

Foster, Daniel M., merchant and native of Wayne Station, Lawrence Co., Tenn., was born May 12, 1840, son of George W. and Celia (McGrew) Foster, born respectively in Kentucky and Tennessee. The father was one of the pioneer settlers of Lawrence County, coming here in 1830. He was a successful farmer, and is yet living at the advanced age of seventy-six years. The mother died in 1843. After attaining man's estate our subject began farming and carpentering, at which trade he served an apprenticeship under his father. In 1876 he began merchandising, establishing a store at Blake's Mill on Buffalo Creek, which he managed three years, also carrying on farming. He then engaged in farming and stock raising exclusively, at which he was very successful. In 1883 he began keeping a general merchandise store at Wayne Station, and carried a complete and full line of family groceries and country produce, controlling a large trade. October 9, 1960, he and Martha N. Wooten were untied in marriage. Of twelve children born to them two are dead. Those living are John H., Julia A. (Mrs. J.A. Keeton), James W., Maggie B. (Mrs. T.H. Colley), Alice (Mrs. J.W. Escue), Dora, Daniel W., Albert W., Willie and Cora. Mr. Foster is a Republican in Politics, and has been magistrate of the Tenth District for six years. He and family are leading members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he has been a Master Mason since 1870.

Garrett, James W., register of Lawrence County, is a native of Washington County, Ark., and born January 20, 1859, the son of Joseph and Millie E. (Rice) Garrett, natives of Tennessee. The parents moved from Hickman County, Tenn., to Arkansas, in 1858. When the late war broke out the father enlisted in the Confederate service as a lieutenant, and afterward became a wagon master. He contracted sickness in the service and died. His wife returned to Hickman County in 1866, where she still resides. James W. was reared on a farm, and when seventeen years old began farming for himself. He taught school and soon went to Lawrenceburg, and attended school there ten months, and then engaged as clerk in the mercantile business. In 1879 he engaged for himself in the mercantile business, and continued until the autumn of 1884. Politically Mr. Garrett is a strong Democrat. At the age of twenty-one years he was elected magistrate, and in 1882 was elected register of the county. June 8, 1882, he married Miss Alice L. Chaffin, who had borne her husband one son--Joseph C. Deceased. Mr. Garrett and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Gilmore, James M., clerk of the Lawrence County Court, was born in Giles County, Tenn., February 17, 1843, son of John S. and Elizabeth (Simms) Gilmore, Both natives of Tennessee. The parents died when James M. was a small lad, consequently he knows but little of his ancestral history. He worked as a farm hand, after his father's death, in Giles County, and in 1861 enlisted in capt. Cooper's Company, Third Regiment, Tennessee Confederate Infantry. He served as a private and non-commissioned officer in the late war until it's close, and was slightly wounded three times, but never seriously enough to leave his company. At the close of the war he resumed his agricultural pursuits in Lewis County, and later in Hickman County, until 1876, when he came to Lawrenceburg and engaged as clerk in the mercantile business. Hr was also deputy county court clerk, which latter position he filled until he was elected to the office of county court clerk in 1882. He also engaged in the general mercantile business for himself four years before and up to the time of his election to the office. Mr. Gilmore has served one term of four years in the office in an able and efficient manner, ans was re-elected in August, 1886, by handsome majority. In 1867 Permelia E. Flowers, of Hickman County, became his wife, and the fruits of this union were five children; Anna (wife of W.P. McClanahan, of Lawrenceburg), Narcissa, Mattie (who died August 28, 1886, aged fourteen years and nine months). Willie D. (who died in his fifth year), and Lillie. In politic Mr. Gilmore is an unswerving Democrat. He is a Mason and a member of the K. of H. Himself and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is recognized as one of the enterprising and public-spirted citizens of Lawrence County, and is a poplar official.

Hagan, John A. (deceased) was born in Kentucky December 1, 1811, son of John and Rebecca (Wilson) Hagan, and of Irish descent. He was a prominent citizen and business man of his county and succeeded in accumulating a comfortable competency for himself and family. He owned large iron works and cotton-mills, and also owned and controlled a large and paying plantation, besides being in the mercantile business, the latter consisting of three different houses--one located at Lawrenceburg, one at West Point, and the other at his home, near the cotton-mills. He afterward owned and managed a store and grist-mill, on Fall River, which he continued to manage up to the time of his death, which occurred while on a visit to his son, at Mt. Pleasant, Maury Co., Tenn., July 22, 1868. Mr. Hagan was a stanch Union man during the war, and used all his influence to keep his State from seceding. He suffered great losses in slaves and other property. February 18,1835, he wedded Mary A. Bumpass, daughter of Hartwell J Bumpass, of Giles County, Tenn., and James W., William H., John H., Francis M.A., Mary T., Etha J., Susan R., Bourgeois B., Lewis N., Marcella R., George W., Andrew A., and Charles M. are their children. Their mother was born in Lawrence County February 6, 1816. Her father, Hartwell J. Bumpass, came from South Carolina to Tennessee at an early day. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. He died about 1878. James W., John A., Hagan's eldest son, wedded Mollie E. Potts, and James A., Robert H., John W. and Alonzo A. are their children. William H., the second son, wedded Mollie E. Sykes. Their children are William J., Edward W., Minnie B. and Burgeous M. Their mother died in 1873, and he then married Mattie B. Smith, and Mattie E., Hartwell B. and Ethel May were born to them. John H. served in the late war and died at his home February 8, 1864. Francis M.A. was killed during the late war at Jackson, Miss. Mary T. died November 13, 1868. Etha J. (Mrs. Alonzo Lindsey) is the mother of the following children: Edward A., Dannie, Eugene S., Maizy, Willie, and Bessie. Susan R. died October 27, 1851. Burgeous B. married Bettie A. Powell, and to this alliance were born two children: Mary E. and Cecil. Lewis N. married Calladonia E. Dobbins, and of their four children, John E., Willie and Bessie are still living. George W. and Malenia A. Hammond were married and have no children. Andrew A. took for his wife Mary F. Appleton, who died 1884. To Charles M.'s marriage with Lurilla A. McMasters two children were born: Marcella T. and Henry. The majority of the Hagan family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mrs. Hagan, wife of John A. Hagan. owns 832 acres of land, which she manages, with the aid of her youngest sons. The Hagan family are highly respected citizens, and are Democrats of old-time type.

Hail, William F. is a native of the county in which he now resides, his birth taking place in 1828. His father was a Virginian and came to Tennessee with his parents when quite young. He was a farmer, and served under Jackson in the Indian wars. During one of the battles he obtained possession of an Indian boy, whom he afterward reared and educated. He gave him a medical education and he practiced that profession in Maury County till his death. The father married Tolitha Badgett, who bore him nineteen children, fourteen of whom lived to be grown, and six are living at the present time. The mother died in 1838, and the father wedded Martha Sullivan, who bore him five children, three yet living. The father died in 1852. William F. Hail was married in 1851 to Mary A. Vaughn, who is a Tennessean, born in 1826, and a daughter of Thomas and Mary A. (Westmore) Vaughn. To Mr. and Mrs. Hail were born the following children: John T., Laura N. (deceased), Tolitha E., Mary A., Margaret E., Margie A. and William F. Their mother died in 1867, and Mr. Hail took for his second wife Margaret McLaren, who was born in Tennessee in 1833, and died in 1880. In 1882 Mr. Hail wedded Ella Joyce, daughter of Henry and Nancy (Kimbrew) Joyce, who were born in South Corolina and Tennessee, respectively. Mrs. Hail was born in 1845. Our subject has always resided on a farm, and began doing for himself at the age of twenty-three years. He served in the late war, enlisting in 1862. He was a brave and faithful soldier, and returned home in April, 1865. In 1866 he purchased his present farm of 160 acres and is doing well financially. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a Democrat in Politics.

Hammonds, George W. is a son of Willis and Ursley (Newton) Hammonds, born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1800 and 1805, respectively. He was an early pioneer of Tennessee and 250 acres of land. His wife died in Giles County July 14, 1869. George W. was educated in the common schools of his native county and at Lexington, Ala. He became salesman in a country store near his home and held that position about one year before the war. At this juncture he joined the Confederate Army, holding the position of first lieutenant in company H. Thirty-second Tennessee Regiment. At the fall of Fort Donelson he was captured and held prisoner at Camp Morton, Indianapolos, Ind., for seven months. He was exchanged at Vicksburg, and was in the memorable battle of Chickamauga, where he was seriously wounded and disabled from further duty. He was married, in Lauderdale County, Ala., February 7, 1883, to Maria C. Landman, daughter of Samuel Landman. They have one child, Jesse Wade, born! February 22, 1884. Mrs. Hammonds was born i n Ala., June 7, 1852. Mr. Hammonds is a notary public, and has been magistrate for seven years. He owns 644 acres of good land, which he devotes in a small way to the cultivation of cotton, but gives his chief attention to raising the cereals.

Hannah, Eli F. was born in Lincoln County, N.C., June 30, 1829, the son of John and Mary (Wells) Hannah, both natives of the same State. In 1830 the father came to Rutherford County, Tenn., but soon moved to Giles County. His occupation was blacksmithing. He died in 1879, and his in 1882. Eli F. was reared on his father's farm, securing in youth a fair education. Soon after attaining his majority he engaged in mercantile pursuits, but after one year returned to the farm on Craw Fish Creek. Here he farmed and worked at blacksmithing until 1882, when he removed to his present place. He is successful in farming and stock raising. In 1857 he married Miss Mary O., daughter of Hardy and Nancy (Compton) Willeford, who has borne him five children, four still living, viz.: Sallie R. (wife of E.C. Locke), John W., James H., Clinton C. The other child, Mary A., died in 1874, aged four years. Politically Mr. Hannah is a republican, and himself and family are members of the Christian Church. He is recognized as one of the county's most respected and substantial citizens.

Herrin, Charles J. is a North Carolinan by birth, born in 1804, and immigrated to Tennessee when a young man. He has been a farmer and merchant all his life, and has held the office of magistrate for many years. He also served as constable, county surveyor, notary public and register. He first married a Miss Allen, who bore him one child, named Mary, who died when about twenty of age. His wife lived but a short time. Mr. Herrin then wedded Martha Abernathy, and the following children are the result of their union: James L. , Charles F., Emma E., Amanda F., Benjamin F., Martha J., Napoleon B., Theodore and Joseph. The last three are dead. Their mother was born June 26, 1817, and died June 14, 1859. Mr. Herrin married his wife May 25, 1862. She was Eliza S. Hale, who was born in Tennessee May 16, 1845, and is the mother of three children: Jennie L., Dora J., and Joel M. The eldest son, James L., resided with his father until attaining his majority; since that time he ! has farmed, and is engaged in merchandising, but closed out the latter to farming, and owns 160 acres of very good land near West Point, besides two other farms of 150 and 175 acres each. He was born December 2, 1837, and has been a member of the Methodist Church since 1883. In May, 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate service, and was in some of the hardest fought battles of the war. He was captures at Fort Donelson, and was a prisoner for six months at Fort Warren. He was quartermaster in the Third Tennessee Regiment, and in 1872 was married to Mary J. Welch, who was born in 1859, ans is the mother of five children: Horace, born in 1874; Emma h., in 1876; May j. in 1878; Blanche, in 1880, and died in 1882; and Frank, born in 1885. Mr. Herrin is a Democrat.

Harrison, Daniel G. was born near Winchester, Franklin Co., Tenn., January 19,1890, the second of ten children of David and Eliza (McCoy) Harrison. He is of English descent, and after remaining with is parents and attending the common schools until nineteen years of age he joined the sixteenth Alabama Infantry and served in the late war four years. He was wounded at Chickamauga and was disabled from duty one year. He was captured at Murfreesboro, but was soon exchanged at Richmond, Va. He was finally released from duty, owing to the wound he had received just prior to the close of the war. August 27, 1865, he was married, in Lauderdale County, Ala., to Sarah a. Dickson, daughter of Thomas Dickson, a prominent planter of that county. Mrs. Harrison was born in Lawrence County, Tenn., September 17, 1839, and is the mother of the following children: William T., Daniel M., David L., Lula E., Eliza E., Charles O'Connor, James K. Polk and Sarah a. Mr. Harrison is an old line Democrat and has been magistrate of his district for sixteen years. He has a fine farm of 240 acres, and is succeeding well financially. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Subject's father was born in Virginia in 1813, and was reared by a uncle, his parents having died when he was a small lad. He came Franklin Co., Tenn., at an early period, and after sixteen years' residence in that county moved to Alabama, where he resided until his death in the autumn of 1879. The mother is yet residing in Lamar County, ala. She was born about 1821 and is a native of Winchester County, Tenn.

Harvey, Dr. Robert H., an influential citizen of Lawrence County, Tenn., was born in Williamson County, of the same State, August 31, 1841, and is a son of John W. and Mildred (Bailey) Harvey, both native Virginians. The subject's grandfather, Isom Harvey, came to Williamson County, Tenn., about 1830, and resided there until his death. john W. was born February 15, 1811, and came to Williamson County, after his marriage to 1836, where he has since resided, following farming and stock raising successfully. He has been magistrate in the county for a number of years. Our subject was reared on a farm and secured but a limited education in his youthful days. He was attending school when the war broke out, and in 1861 he enlisted in Company H, Twentieth Regiment Tennessee Confederate Infantry, and served until the close of the war, being early promoted to the staff of Gen. Zollicoffer, where he remained until the death of the General. He then served on the staff of John C. Breckinridge, Gen. (now Gov.) Bates, and finally with Thomas Benton smith as staff officer, ranking at close as first lieutenant of artillery. In November, 1865, he came to Lawrenceburg, and engaged in the drug business, and also begun the study of medicine, graduating from the medical department of the University of Nashville (now Vanderbilt) with the degrees of M.D. in 1868. He then practiced in Wayne County eighteen months, after which he returned to Lawrenceburg, where he has since resided, and engaged actively in the practice of his profession until 1880, since which time he has given his entire time to selling lands in the county, controlling about 10,000 acres in this county. He has also given some attention to cotton manufacturing, having an interest in the Crescent Cotton mills of this county. August 5, 1869, the Doctor married Matty J. Bentley, a native of this county. Two children, Robert B. and Mildred M., were born to this union. The Doctor is a democrat in politics, a Mason, and a member of the Baptist Church; Mrs. Harvey is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Dr. Harvey is one of the few successful business men of our county. He has always taken an active interest in all laudable public enterprises, and has contributed largely to the interest and welfare of the county.

Harvey Bros. are dealers in furniture and general merchandise and also undertakers of Lawrenceburg, Tenn. The firm is composed of Isham o. and john H. Harvey, and was established by the present firm February, 1885. Isham O. was born in Williamson County, Tenn., June 10,1850, son of Holcomb and Mary (Wilson) Harvey, natives respectively of Virginia and Georgia; was reared on a farm in Williamson and Maury Counties, Tenn., and removed to Lawrence County 1867. He then went to Texas and engaged in the cattle business for nine years, after which he returned to Williamson County, 1879, and engaged in agricultural pursuits until March, 1884, when he returned to this county and in 1885 engaged in their present business. Mr. Harvey is a strong advocate of the principles of democracy and is one among the popular and successful young business men in our County.

Herbert, Snowden B., M.D., of Wayland Springs, Tenn., is a native of Madison County, Ala., born 1828. He sided with his mother until seventeen years of age, and then came to Wayland Springs and read medicine under his brother, Dr. C.L. Herbert, for two years. Owing to ill health he was compelled to abandon the study of medicine, and for two years in government surveying, after which he clerked two years in a general merchandise establishment in Florence, Ala. About this time he and his brother, F.C. Herbert, purchased an interest in the establishment, and the firm became Dean & Herbert. The same year they opened a similar establishment at Wayland springs, the firm being F.C. Herbert & Co. They carried on a successful business four years, when there was a decline in cotton and they were compelled to make an assignment, closing out the entire business in the spring of 1855. Soon after our subject entered the University of Louisville, Ky., attending the sessions of 1855 and 1856. He then practiced medicine in Hardin County, Tenn., until 1861, when he made an extended tour of Texas and Arkansas, looking out a suitable location. On his return home in 1861 there was so much excitement owing to the war that was compelled to remain here, and locate at Wayland Springs. The property was first purchased by F.C. Herbert, and after being in the possession of several different owners was purchased in 1867 by our subject's wife. The springs are four in number, and contain chalybeate, lime, and freestone water and one contains carbonate of magnesia, carbonate of soda, chloride of sodium, protoxide of iron, potash, iodine and bromides. Dr. Herbert is a Democrat and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church south. He is a Mason and I. O..O. F., and was married to Martha A. Koger, April 14, 1853. She was born May 5, 1833, and is the daughter of William and Martha A. (Westmoreland) Koger. Our subject's parents were Peter and Rebecca (McComb) Herbert, of South Carolina, who moved to Alabama in 1816. The father was tanner and farmer, and was a soldier in the war of 1812. He died in Alabama in 1835, and his wife in 1864, being in Georgia at the time of her death.

Hudson, Young M. was born in Maury County, Tenn., September 11, 1811, son of Adam B. and Priscilla (Thomas ) Hudson, who were born in Maryland and were early emigrants to Davidson County, Tenn. They soon after removed to Maury County, Tenn., where they resided until 1836, and then moved to Mississippi, where he died the following year. The mother died in 1822. Young M. attended the common schools, and after attaining his twenty-first year farmed in Maury County until 1860, and then purchased his present farm, where he has since resided and tilled the soil. In 1836 he married Eliza B. Pickens, who died in 1853 leaving five children: William SD., Mary C., James S., Eliza J., (Mrs. Robert Brothers), and Jesse J. In 1854 Mr. Hudson married Amanda J. Williams, of Giles County, and their union has resulted in the birth of five children: Isaac D., James S., Andrew N., Robert M. and Nora E., all of whom are living. Mr. Hudson's political views are democratic, and he has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for upward to thirty years. He and Mrs. Hudson are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Isaacs, Simon, merchant, was born in Poland in the year 1857. He came to the United States in 1873, and for three years followed the mercantile business in Nashville. He then returned to the old country, and in 1878 again came to the United States and began business in Pulaski. In February, 1883, he engaged in the dry goods and clothing business at Lawrenceburg, and has thus continued until the present. He carries a large, select stock of goods and has a constantly growing trade. He carries the only line of ready-made clothing in the town or county. He also carries hats, boots, shoes and notions, and controls much of the trade in these articles. In November, 1882, he married Annie Solinsky at Pulaski, who has borne him one son, Seymour. Mrs. Isaacs is independent in politics. Himself and his wife are members of the Jewish faith. He is one of the most enterprising business men of the town or county, and possesses all the shrewdest and sagacity of his race.

Johnson, William W., a pioneer citizen of Tennessee, is a native of Lawrence County, Tenn., born in 1820. His father, Robert Johnson, was born in North Carolina and came to Tennessee when quite young. He was a farmer, and married Mary McLaren, of South Carolina, who bore him eight sons, seven of whom lived to be grown, and four are yet living. The father was a major and colonel in the State of militia, and died in 1836. His widow then married a Mr. Thorton. She died in 1857. William W.'s early days were spent on his father's farm, where he resided until 1844, and the emigrated to Mississippi, and was first employed in keel-boating on Chickasaw River. He farmer for some time, and so acted as overseer for several men. After traveling several months in Arkansas he was untied in marriage to Mary A. Shoffner, who was born in Tennessee in 1830, daughter of Martin and Jane (Johnson) Shoffner. Soon after their marriage they purchased a farm, but sold out in 1856, and after being employed as overseer for two years he purchased and moved on to his father's farm, and there now lives. This farm is near the noted Wayland Springs, and contains about 900 acres. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church; he is a Democrat and his first presidential vote was cast for Martin Van Buren. His family consisted of seven children, six of whom are living: Mary J. (deceased), Robert a., Andrew, Laura L. , Emma, Wiley B, and Albert s. Andrew is a practicing physician on the home place, being a graduate of the Vanderbilt University.

Johnson, Josphus S., a native of Lawrence County, Tenn., was born an 1832, and was reared to manhood on a farm. When about twenty-five years of age he removed to Arkansas and was engaged in teaching school, farming and clerking in a general merchandise establishment, remaining in the State two years. At that time he entered the Confederate service and remained until 1863, being a participant in the battle of Shiloh and others of less note. At the last named date he returned home and began pedagoging, meeting with good success for five years. He then united his fortunes with those of Amanda Herrin, who was born 1844, and the daughter of C.J. and Martha (Abernathy) Herrin. Their union was blessed in the birth of ten children: Richard F., Martha O., Joseph L., Robert C., Ann Eliza V., Edna E., Eldridge H., Loulie H., Emma M. (deceased), and Mary E. Mr. Johnson taught school every year until 1873, when he purchased his present farm of 238 acres of well cultivated land. In 1876 he was elected magistrate of District N. 1, and has faithfully discharged the duties of that office up to the present time. He was elected surveyer in 1881 and holds that office also. He has always been a stanch Democrat in politics.

Joiner, Colombus M. was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., March 12, 1860, the son of James and Lucy (Rust) Joiner, natives of Alabama. The father died at Jackson, Miss., in 1863, of sickness contracted in the Confederate service. Columbus M. was reared by his mother, and in 1868 was taken by her to Shawneetown, Ill. Here she died, in December, 1870. In 1871 Columbus went to Mississippi, remaining there until 1873, when he returned to his native county. In 1877 he went to Texas and herded cattle in that State for two years. He returned in 1879, and engaged in the liquor and mercantile business, continuing until 1883, when he came to Lawrenceburg and engaged in the retail liquor business, and is thus engaged at present. In 1886 he opened a general hardware and agricultural implement store, and now has a good and growing business. January 16, 1881, he married Lydia Ann Beavers, and by her has two sons. He is a Democrat and an a enterprising citizen.

Kennedy, John B., clerk of the circuit and criminal courts of Lawrence County, Tenn., and a native of Giles County, of the same State, was born November 6, 1843, son of John and Parsy Kennedy, both natives of Kentucky. The father came to Tennessee in the twenties and located on a farm in Giles County, where he followed agricultural pursuits and stock raising successfully, being the first man to introduce the celebrated Kentucky blue grass in that region. He died there when are subject was about seven or eight years of age. John B. was reared on a farm in his native county, ans secured a fair literary education, having just completed his sophomore year in Centre College, Danville, Ky., when the war broke out. He enlisted in the Southern Army, as private in Company A,, Third Tennessee Infantry (Gov. John C. Brown's regiment), and served gallantly and faithfully in that sanguinary struggle until, at it close, he was seriously wounded at Chickamauga, and also at Jonesboro, Ga., having his musket shot from his hand at the latter place and losing a finger. At the close of the war he returned home and engaged in mercantile pursuits until 1868, when he repaired to his farm, in Giles County, where he remained until 1871, after which he removed to Lawrence County and soon after engaged in the mercantile business. At the end of four or five years he returned to Pulaski, and engaged in the same business at that place. In 1884 he returned to this county, and the same year was elected to fill the unexpired term of T. L. Bentley (deceased) in the circuit clerk's office, and has discharged the duties of this important office in a highly satisfactory manner, to the present time. November 17,1869, he wedded Alice L. McClain, a native of Lawrence County, Tenn. They have on son, named Joseph McClain. Mr. Kennedy is, and always has been an unswerving Democrat. On the 5th day of August, 1886, Mr. Kennedy was re-elected circuit court clerk by a handsome majority.

Kidd, Allen H., is a son of George and Nancy N. Kidd, who were born respectively, in North Carolina and Tennessee. George Kidd was one of the early immigrants to Tennessee, and followed the vocation of farming in Giles and Lawrence Counties. He died 1843, and the mother in 1876. Allen H. was born in Lawrence County March 18, 1843, and his early days were spent on the farm with his mother. He received a practical education, and at the age of fourteen, began clerking in Henryville, Tenn., where he remained one year and a half. In 1861, he joined Capt. Armstrong's company, Twenty-third Tennessee Regiment, and served as high private at that company until 1863, when he joined the cavalry, under the command of Gen. Forrest, ans was elected to the office of second lieutenant, but was soon after wounded near Lawrenceburg and was disabled for further service. He returned home after the close of the conflict, and for two years tilled the soil, and the following two years was a merchant of Columbia. He established a mercantile store at Henryville, and some time later built a large saw and grist-mill on Water Fork of Buffalo River, which he operated in connection with a store. In September 1883, he established a store at Carpenter Station, but in January, 1886, opened up his present general merchandise store. He is doing well financially and controls a large trade. Mr. Kidd has seen fit to remain a bachelor. He is a Democrat in politics, and is one of the successful and enterprising business men of the county.

Lackey, William K., an influential citizens of Lawrence County, Tenn., is a native of Giles County, born in 1844. His father was a native Tennessean and reared on a farm, but followed teaching the greater portion of his life. The mother, whose maiden name was Flora McCollum, was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee with her parents when quite young. Mr. and Mrs. Lackey became the parents of four children, two of whom are yet living. The father died in 1863, and the mother six years later. Our subject resided at home until twenty-six years of age. After his mother's death, at her request, he attended school about ten months and acquired a good education. He then taught school in Tennessee and Missouri for some time, and in 1857 was united in marriage to Nannie M. Spencer, daughter of A.J. and M.E. (Wayland) Spencer. Mrs. Lackey was born in Tennessee, in 1859. Her grandfather, S.H. Wayland, was the founder, and at one time the owner, of the noted Wayland Springs. Our subject and his wife are the parents of three children: Minnie L., William P., and Ida. In 1880 Mr. Lackey purchased his present farm, consisting of seventy-five acres of fairly improved land. In 1883 he was elected county superintendent of Lawrence County, and is holding the position at the present time. He is a Democrat in politics and cast his first presidential vote for S.J. Tilden.

Legg, David C., Was born in East Tennessee January 4, 1814, and is a son of William Legg, who was also born in East Tennessee, in 1798. After attaining his majority he married Nancy Coffman, and soon moved to Jackson, Ala. where he remained about five years. He then moved to Limestone County, and there resided until his death in 1880. The mother was born in Jefferson County, Tenn., in 1800, and died in Limestone County, Ala., in 1880. David C. Legg was educated in the common schools and chose the free and independent life of a farmer as his calling through life. At the age of twenty-three he began working on his own responsibility, and in 1837 moved to the Lone Star State. The Indians were very troublesome , at the time, to white settlers, and he assisted the Texans in their war against them. and for his services received 320 acres of land. Besides this, he took and to the amount of 1,280 acres, and if these claims can be established, they will result in a handsome for! tune to Mr. Legg. To his marriage with Mary Halbert, in 1835, two children were born: James A. and Susan S. Mrs Legg died in Texas in 1840. In 1845 he wedded Mary J. Carlisle; and William W., Eliza J., Joel E., Rufus E., Theodocia, Emily E., Clelstia and Emma Clarinda are their children. Their mother died October 14, 1882. Mr. Legg married Mrs. Keziah Basshan, daughter of James Roper, September 24, 1884. Our subject is a Democrat and Mason, and he and wife are members of the Baptist and Methodist Episcopal Church, respectively.

Locke, James W., farmer of Lawrence County, Tenn., is a son of Walter Locke, of North Carolina, who was one of the pioneer settlers of Giles County, Tenn. He was farmer and married Rachel Ross, of Kentucky. He died about 1852, and the mother six years later. James W. Locke was born in Giles County September 13, 1813, and attended the primitive log schoolhouse of his boyhood days. At the age of twenty-one he began farming in Giles County, and at the death of his father purchased his farm. In 1861 he bought and located on his present place, where he has been a prosperous farmer and stock raiser. In 1835 he wedded Asenath C. McCreary, who died in 1842, leaving four children, three now living: Nancy C. (deceased), Eliza M. (Mrs. James Carter), John S, and Martha A. (Mrs. James Brownlow). In 1846, Mr. Locke married Elizabeth A. Braly, and nine children are the result of their union: Nathaniel H., William M., Sarah F. (who died in 1881), Ephraim C., Robert N., Mary A. (Mrs. J.W. Cross), Asenath C. (Mrs. James Spreegle), Walter S. and Cora E. Mr. Locke is neutral in politics, and himself and family are leading members of the Christian Church.

Lumpkins, James M. is the eldest of eight children, and was born on Knob Creek April 26, 1837, son of William H. Lumpkin, who was born in North Carolina in 1811, and came to Tennessee when a young man. He married Eliza Smith and reared his family. He breathed his last at the old homestead when about sixty-six years of age. The mother was born September 24, 1816, and is still living. James M. received his early education in the common schools and has made farming his chief calling through life. He served in the Ninth Tennessee Cavalry under Col. Biffle, Confederate States Army, in the late war, and was in many skirmishes. He took the oath of allegiance at Columbia just before the close of the war. He has been married three times, and had three children by his first wife, Sarah M. Springer. Their names are Sarah C., James F. and William S. Mrs. Lumpkins died in 1865. His second wife, Eliza C. Belew, who died March 16, 1873, bore the following four children: Telie A., Mollie L., Anna E. and Robert Lee. Margaret L., Katie Jane, Louis N., John C. (deceased), Charles and Richard Earl are the children of his third wife, Malinda C. Kelley, who was born in Georgia January 24, 1853. Mr. Lumpkins is rather independent in politics, but leans toward the Democratic party. He owns 100 acres of good land is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He and his wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

Lumpkins, William G., farmer, is the fourth of eight children, and was born in Lawrence County, Tenn., March 1, 1844. (See James M. Lumpkin's for parent's sketch). He received the education and rearing of the average farm boy, and at the breaking of the late war enlisted in the Confederate service, in the Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, and served two years, taking an active part in the battles of Franklin and Nashville. March 30, 1865, was the date of his marriage with Caladonia Springer. To them were born the following children: William J., Gustavus H., Andrew J., Barney P., John B., Lucius T., and Jane Gertrude. Mrs. Lumpkins was born in Lawrence County October 19, 1846. He father was born in South Carolina, and came to Tennessee when a young man, where he married are reared his family. Mrs. Lumpkins can trace her ancestry back eight centuries. Our subject is a liberal Democrat and is a wealthy farmer, owning, at the present time over 700 acres of land, 500 acres being in ! the home place. His chief attention is given to fine stock raising and the production of the cereals.

McClain, Ephraim M.D., was born July 29, 1827, in Maury County, Tenn., one of twelve children born to John and Elizabeth (McMillen) McClain, who were born the year following the Declaration of Independence, and when a young man moved to Kentucky, where he married and came to Tennessee about the beginning of the present century. He was soldier of the war of 1812, and was with Jackson at New Orleans. He soon after returned to Maury County, and followed a long and useful life as a farmer. He died at the remarkable age of one hundred and four years, respected by all who knew him. Our subject was reared and educated in his native county, and taught school a number of years. In 1853 he began the study of medicine, and the same year came to Lawrence County and studied with Dr. J.M. Hamilton, and in 1855 been practice in this and with more than ordinary success, and has a large practice in this and adjoining counties. August 2, 1849, he wedded Annie Clendennin, a native of North ! Carolina who died May 4, 1885, leaving one child-Alice (Mrs. J.B. Kennedy), who was engrossing clerk in the House of Representatives in 1883-85. She is a lady of culture and intelligence, and filled the position in a very satisfactory manner. The Doctor is a Democrat, and belongs to the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities. He belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He served three months in his professional capacity in the Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, under Col. Biffle.

McClure, H.D., M.D., a prominent physician and citizen of Wayland Springs, Tenn., was born in Alabama in 1853, son of Harvey B. and Rebecca (Herbert) McClure, who were born in Tennessee and Alabama, respectively. The father was a farmer by occupation, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and a Democrat in politics. He died in Alabama in 1869. Our subject's early days were spent on a farm, and in attending the country schools. He was salesman in a family grocery store for two years, after which he resided on a farm until 1873. He then began studying medicine under Dr. S.B. Herbert and remained with him for three years. He then practiced with the Doctor for three years, when they dissolved partnership, and Dr. McClure has since practiced his profession alone, meeting with merited success. In 1878 he wedded Emma Alford, who was born in Tennessee in 1861., and is the mother of three children: Maudie R., Fannie S., and Claudie A. Mrs. McClure's parents were James M. and Fannie (Childree) Alford. Dr. McClure is a member of the Masonic fraternity and a Democrat, casting his first presidential vote for S.J. Tilden.

McKey, James H. was born in Alabama, 1838, son of Charles and Eveline (Fisher) McKey. Charles McKey was born in Palmetto State, and moved to Alabama with his parents about 1810, where he first married Eliza Cauthen. She died about seven months later, and he then married Miss Fisher, who bore him two children. The father was a farmer and served in the late war under Col. Murphy, being a Federal soldier. During his service he contacted a disease which resulted in his death, in September, 1877. Our subject received a good education in the country schools and resided with his father on a farm until 1857, when he wedded Martha A. Fondren, born 1839. Dovey E., Charles A. (deceased), Elizabeth S. (deceased), and Edward T. are their children. Mrs. McKey died in 1870, and in September , 1871 Sarah F. Earnest became his second wife and the mother of the following family: Alcie C., Taylor H. , Luther A., Pink L. and Rufus B. Mrs. McKey was born in 1854, and is the daughter of Moses and Mary Earnest, of Alabama. She died in 1882, and a year later he took for his third wife Sarah Rob Roy. Mr. McKey served as sheriff two years and was United States deputy collector one year, and held various minor offices. He fell heir to 265 acres of his father's estate, and has added to it until he now owns 500 acres. His farm contains rich ore beds, and he also has a bluff of fine variegated marble, and a good deposit of fine sandstone that will rank with the best known. In 1880 Mr. McKey was admitted to the Lawrenceburg bar, and has given the most of his attention to his profession since that time. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and is a Democrat. In 1862 he enlisted in Company H, Sixth Tennessee Cavalry, and served until surrender, participating in many of the principal battles. He served in the Federal Army and was a true and tried soldier.

McLaren, John C., is a Bedford County, Tennessean, born in 1819. He resided on his parent's farm until the father's death, when he took charge of the home place, and afterward fell heir to a portion of it and purchased the remainder. It consists of 270 acres, and is in a good state of cultivation. the dwelling in which he lives was erected in 1833, and was used for several years, at intervals, for public worship and school. John C. wedded Chanie A. Blythe in 1854, and Theodore D., Mary J., Susan C., Charles T., and William F. are their children. Mrs. McLaren was born in 1838, and is the daughter of Jacob and Jane (Holland) Blythe. She and her husband are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for James K. Polk. Subject's parents, Daniel and Susan (Ruthledge) McLaren, were born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee when quite young. The father was a agriculturist, and served in the late war of 1812, and also in the Creek and Seminole wars. He died in Lawrence County in 1838, and his widow married Samuel McCain, who lived but a short time. She lived a widow the remainder of her life, and died in 1882. Daniel McLaren, grandfather of our subject, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and died in Lawrence County, Tenn., in 1840. His father, Daniel McLaren, served five years in the Revolutionary war, and held rank of major. He died in Hickman County in 1844.

McLean, R.L. was born in Lawrence County, Tenn., May 1, 1825. John McLean, his father, was born in South Carolina, and when about twenty-three years of age married Mary McDougal, of Alabama, who bore him nine children, all residents of Texas, except our subject. The father was a farmer and an early resident of Tennessee; he died in 1863. R. A. began doing for himself when about twenty-two years of age, and in 1848 was untied in marriage to Sarah E. Hale, daughter of John A. and Tolitha (Badgett) Hale. She was born in Tennessee in 1830, and is one of nineteen children, three of whom are living. Her mother died in 1835, and her father then married Martha Sullivan, who bore him six children. The father was a private in the Creek and Seminole Wars, and died in 1853. Shortly after our subject's marriage he purchased a farm of 195 acres near Factory Creek, where he resided until 1868. He then purchased the farm on which he now lives, consisting of 333 acres. He was chosen magistrate in 1856, and faithfully performed the duties of the office for twelve years. He was enrolling officer of his district during the civil war, and since 1863 has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South: his wife belongs to the same church. He is a stanch Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for James K. Polk.

McLean, John L., county trustee, was born in this county December 4, 1840, the son of Samuel D. and Elizabeth C. (Wasson) McLean, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Indiana. Samuel D. when a boy came to this County, 1817, locating at McLean's Spring, three miles east of Lawrenceburg. Here the grandfather, Samuel, raised a family of five sons and four daughter, and followed the occupation of farming until his death, in 1850. The father of John L. was reared in this county, married here and reared his family on the old homestead. He was a useful citizen, his death occurring in 1880, and his wife's in 1884. John L. was reared a farmer, securing a limited education. At the age of twenty-four years he began farming for himself on his father's farm. In 1872 he bought land in the Eighteenth District, where he resided until 1880, when he moved to near Lawrenceburg. Mr. McLean is a Democrat, through his ancestors were Whigs. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, Third Tennessee! Confederate Regiment, and served until the cessation of hostilities. Twice he was seriously wounded. At Raymond, Miss., his leg was broken by a bullet, and at Jonesboro, Ga., he was wounded in the face and head by a minie-ball. He was also slightly wounded at Fort Donelson and at Powder Spring Road, Ga. In 1871 he was made deputy sheriff, and in 1884 was elected county trustee. In 1870 he married Miss Rachel C. Norman, who died in 1874, leaving two children: Coda and Thomas. In 1881 he married Mrs. Dora L. Carter, who has borne two children: Walter and Burgie.

Meredith, Thomas H., livery man of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., was born in Giles County, Tenn. May 23,1846, and is a son of Thomas H. and Jane J, (Hodge) Meredith, both natives of Giles County., Tenn., where the father followed farming successfully until his death, in 1860, and the mother died November 1882. Our subject was reared in Pulaski and educated in Giles College. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, First Regiment Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army, and served until the close of the war. He then returned home and engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1875, after which he traded, selling nursery stock until 1883, when he came to Lawrenceburg and erected his present large and commodious stable and engaged in the livery business, which he has continued to the present time. He has met with good and well deserved success, having a monopoly of the trade in the town and county. He is a Democrat in politics, and is recognized as one of the enterprising and reliable business men ! of Lawrence County. Mr. Meredith received a slight wound in the head at Cheat Mountain, and a serious wound in the body at Missionary Ridge; he also was slightly wounded in the foot at Perryville, Ky.

Mester, George H., proprietor of the Lawrenceburg Hotel, is a son of Kasper and Mary (Nieman) Mester, natives of Prussia, where they lived and died. George was born in Munster, Westphalia, Prussia, September 19, 1837, and was reared and educated in his native country, learning the baker's occupation of his father. At the age of seventeen years he came to the United States, locating at Cincinnati, where he learned the cabinet-maker's trade. He worked at this for twelve years and then engaged in the grocery business three years. In 1868 he prospected through the Southern States for a suitable place to locate, and finally, in 1870, came to Lawrenceburg and engaged in the cabinet-maker's trade and carpentering at the place. At the end of four years he built his present hotel and engaged in his business in connection with the other; but during the last five years he has given almost his entire attention to the first-class accommodation of the traveling public. January 21, 1858, he married Anna M. Riesenbeck, a native of that city, and the result of this union is an interesting family of six children: Anna M., George H., Frances, Katie, John W., And Louis H. Mr. Mester and family are members of the Catholic Church. He is a good citizen and one of the best business men of the county.

Metcalf, James M., a native of Lincoln, County, was born June 1, 1845, being the son of William H. and Jane (Kennon) Metcalf, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Tennessee. The father moved to Tennessee in 1840 and followed merchandising until his death, in 1873. The mother died in 1863. Upon reaching his majority James M. (after securing a good classical education, finishing in Bethany College, in Giles County), began life for himself. In 1862 he enlisted in Freeman's (Confederate) battery, with which he continued to serve until the close of the war. At Parker's Cross Roads, Tenn., he was seriously wounded, from which he never completely recovered. After the war he traveled three years and then engaged in the mercantile business at Petersburg, as a clerk. After two or three years he continued the same business at Fayetteville, and about four years later started the mercantile business for himself at Columbia. In 1878 he removed to this county. In 1882 he established his present business. In 1876 he married Miss Felicia, daughter of Gen. F.K. Zollicoffer, who has borne her husband four children, two living-Mary L. and Felicia L. Mr. Metcalf is a Democrat and was appointed postmaster by President Cleveland. He is a Mason, and his wife is a member of the Episcopal Church.

Neal, Wiley W., M.D., of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., was born in Giles County, of that State, June 4, 1833, and is a son of Wiley and Nancy (Goggins) Neal, both natives of Newberry district, S.C., where they were married. The came to Tennessee in 1818, locating in Giles County, where they both spent the remainder of their days. Our subject was reared on a farm in Giles County, and secured a fair literary education in his youthful days, attending the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn. At the age of eighteen he engaged in the mercantile business with his brother, in Giles County, where he remained three years. He then taught school and read medicine under Dr. Fields, of Pulaski, after which he taught again in order to secure means to enable him to pursue his medical studies to completion. He attended medical lectures in 1857-58, at the University of Nashville, and then practiced one summer, after which, the following session, he returned and graduated in the spring of 1859. H! e th en returned to Lawrenceburg and entered regularly on the practice of medicine until the breaking out of the civil war. He then enlisted as a private in Capt. B.F. Matthew's company, Third Regiment Confederate Tennessee Infantry, and after serving a few months, was honorably discharged on account of disability. Returning home he resumed his practice at West Point, where he acquired a large and successful practice. January, 1886, he removed to Lawrenceburg, and has continued practicing here, having also bought the only drug store in Lawrenceburg or the county, which he conducts in a successful manner, assisted by his son, Paul A., a practicing physician also. November 18, 1859, our subject married Sarah M. Tidwell, of Giles County, who died January 2, 1880, leaving a family of five children. July 7, 1880, the Doctor married Amanda H. Sowell, of Lawrence County, and one child blessed this union. The Doctor is a Democrat in his political views, but of the more conservative ! class. He is a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Nixon, Hon. William T., clerk and master of the chancery court of Lawrence County, Tenn., and a native of that county, was born November 18, 1846, eldest son of Chancellor George H. Nixon. He received preparatory education at Jackson Academy, of Lawrenceburg, and later attended the literary department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn., from which institution he graduated in 1875. He had in the meantime been studying law, and was admitted to the Lawrence County bar in 1870. After graduating he entered regularly into the Legislature, and served in the session of 1869 and 1870. In 1871 he was appointed to his present position by his father, upon the universal recommendation of the Lawrence County bar, and has continued in the discharge of that office up to the present time. November 19, 1868, Mr. Nixon married Elizabeth G. Parkes, a native of Staffordshire, England. To this union were born three children. He is a Democrat in politics, a Mason, and himself and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he has been ordained a minister. His brother, Henry Nixon, a prominent lawyer of Lawrenceburg and a native of Lawrence County, was born August 18, 1852. He grew to manhood on the farm and finished his education at Vanderbilt University, at Nashville, where he also studied law, graduating from that department in 1875. He then returned to Lawrenceburg, and was admitted to the Lawrence County bar, and has since practiced in its courts. In 1877 he married Laura Parkes, of this county, and four children blessed this union. Mr. Nixon is a Democrat in politics, and a Master Mason. He was chief engineer in the first survey of the Nashville & Florence Railroad, and was secretary, treasurer and superintendent of the road the first three years.

North, Ira, Jr., a prominent farmer of Lawrence County, Tenn., was born in Ohio February 3, 1844, son of Ira and Harriett (Engleston) North, natives, respectively, of New York and Ohio. The father farmed in Ohio and immigrated to Tennessee in 1849, where he followed farming and stock raising. In 1850 he removed to the edge of Wayne County, where he kept an inn. About 1863 he returned to Lawrence County and the next year moved to Davidson County, twelve miles from Nashville, but returned to Lawrence County in 1865, and there now resides, engaged in farming and stock raising. His wife died in 1850. Ira North Jr., received a limited education and was reared on a farm. In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, Tenth Tennessee Regiment Federal Army, the company being known as the Governor's Guards. He served first as corporal and afterward as sergeant, until the close of the war, when he returned home and engaged in farming. In 1871 he purchased his present farm of 135 acres of fine land. August 6, 1866, he married Sarah F. Locke, who died December 24, 1879, leaving two children: Mary I. (Mrs. A.L Spiegel), and William Lee. October 6, 1880, Mr. North married Mary E. Gooch, who bore him four children, two living: H. and N.M. The family are leading members of the Christian Church, and Mr. North is classed among Lawrence County's most enterprising and successful farmers.

Parker, Joshua B., attorney at law, of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., and a native of Giles County, is a son of John A. and Nettie (Baker) Parker, both natives of Giles County, Tenn. The father removed to this county from Giles in 1882, and now follows farming in the Fourteenth District. Our subject was born December 12, 1863; received his education in his native county, and finished in Giles College, at Pulaski, in 1883. In 1878, however, he began reading law in a desultory manner, as he had to support himself and assist in supporting his family. He was a student or protege of Hon. Noble Smithson, and also received some assistance from Col. Solon E. Rose. Our subject came to this county in 1884, and in December of that year was admitted to the bar. He has continued ever since in the practice here, having met with merited success. In November, 1885, he was sworn into practice in the Federal court in Northern Mississippi, and in December of the same year was sworn into practice in! the Federal and supreme courts of Tennessee, enjoying the distinction of being not only the youngest legal practitioner of the county, but one of the youngest attorneys admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Tennessee. He is a Democrat in his political views, not of the younger and more progressive class. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is one of the promising young lawyers of the county.

Pierce, William A., citizen of Wayland Springs ,Tenn., and a native of the State, was born in 1843, son of George W. and Araminta (Mitchell) Pierce. The father was tailor and for many years was a citizen of Lawrenceburg. After residing a short time in Alabama, he returned to Lawrenceburg, where he died in 1855. His wife died in 1845. The grandfather, Spencer Pierce, was a North Carolinian, and settled in Tennessee in 1818. His son George, our subject's father, was a very active man and was noted for being very swift of foot. He was twice married, and by his first wife was the father to two children. Lucy Welch, his second wife, bore him six children. William A. Pierce married Mary L. Green in 1866, daughter of William and Edie Green. She was born in Tennessee 1846, and died in 1865. A year later Mr. Pierce wedded Maggie Goats, daughter of Phillip and Nancy (Yarbrough) Goats. Six children blessed their union: Lula E., Minnie J., Annie L., Maggie V., William H., and ! Alexander A. Our subject made his home with his father until 1855, and then resided with an uncle until 1861, when he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-third Tennessee Regiment, and participated in many hard-fought battles. Owing to a wound received at Shiloh, he was unfitted for service for about one year. He then joined Roddy's cavalry, and shortly after the battle of Moulton, Ala., was captured and kept prisoner at Rock Island, Ill., for about nine months. He was then released, owing to cessation of hostilities, and returned home in March, 1865, and began clerking in a general merchandise store, and at the expiration of one year, opened a similar establishment at Wayland Springs, where he has prospered financially. He is also postmaster at the Springs and is a Mason and K. of H., and is also a member of the K. & L. of H. lodge. Mr.. Pierce is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for Horace Greeley.

Pierce, Aaron A., merchant of Wayland Springs, Tenn., and native of the State, was born in 1850, son of Samuel and Jemima (Carter) Pierce. The father was a farmer and a Democrat, and a participant in the late war. He belonged to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and died in March 1883. His wife died in 1880. The subject of our sketch spent his juvenile days on a farm, and lived with his father up to the time of the latter's death. In 1874 he untied his fortunes with those of Miss Laura Johnson, who was born in Tennessee in 1858, and by her became the father of the following children: Emmett L., Bertie M., Ida G., and Mannie M. Mr. Pierce followed the occupation of farming up to 1881, when he purchased the mercantile stock of M.M. Fisher, at Wayland Springs, and controls a large and lucrative trade. In January, 1886, the family took up their residence at Wayland Springs. Mr. Pierce gives his support to the Democratic party, and his first presidential vote was cast in favor of Horace Greeley. Mrs. Pierce's parents were W.W. and Mary (Shoffner) Johnson.

Powell, M.M. was born in Lawrence County, Tenn., December 5, 1843, son of J.M and Sarah L. (Pullen) Powell, who were born in South Carolina and Tennessee, in 1891 and 1824, respectively. The former died May 26, 1876, but the latter is still living in Lawrence County. Our subject's grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812, under Gen. Jackson. M.M. was reared in Lawrence County, and began doing for himself at the age of twenty-five. His principal occupation has been farming, in which he has been fairly successful, owning at the present time 687 acres of land. November 14, 1867, he married Hannah P. Comer, daughter of Jessee and Margaret (Springer) Comer, and by her is the father of two children: John D., born September 30, 1869, and Calvin T., born October 25, 1873. Mr. Powell served in the Federal Army in the late war, enlisting at Nashville, November 3, 1863, and was mustered our May 16, 1865. He was elected justice of the peace in August, 1876, was re-elected in 1882 and is now serving in that capacity. He is a Democrat, and not a member of any church, but is in sympathy with the Methodist.

Powell, J.B., M.D. was born June 12, 1857, in Lawrence County, Tenn. His parents, Andrew and Malinda (Welch) Powell were born in Marshall and Lawrence Counties, Tenn., in 1830 and 1836, respectively. Both are living and are residents of Lawrence County. Dr. Powell was reared in his native county, and received good early education advantages. He attended Jackson Academy at Lawrenceburg about two years, and at the age of twenty-one began studying medicine under Dr. James Kyle, of Florence, Ala., and graduated as an M.D. from the Vanderbilt University of Nashville, Tenn., in 1879. He immediately located at Wayland Springs, where he remained until April, 1886, when he came to St. Joseph and was appointed United States examining surgeon. In connection with his practice he keeps a drug and general merchandise store at St. Joseph, and is the owner of about 2,300 acres of unimproved mineral lands. Nannie E. Reynolds became his wife December 5, 1880, and the mother of his two children: Lillian E., born February 14, 1882, and George, born July 29, 1884. Mrs. Powell's parents are Hugh R. and Mary A. (Carter) Reynolds. Dr. Powell gives his support to the Democratic party and is one of the directors of the Shoal Creek Iron Company, organized February 24, 1886. The mines are in Lawrence County, near St. Joseph, and the ore, analyzed, has been found to be brown hematite, yielding over 56 per cent of metallic iron. The mines are being operated under the management of Col. Thomas Sharp, of Nashville, who is president of the company.

Price, William J., a leading citizen of Lawrence County, Tenn., is of Scotch-Irish descent, and was born in the States in 1840, son Ezekial and Martha Price, who were natives of North Carolina and settlers of Tennessee in 1821. The father was teacher and merchant in early life, but retired to the farm after marriage. He was member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and died in Lawrence County in 1883. William J. was raised on a farm and educated at West Point, Tenn. At the age of twenty-eight years he began teaching school, and the expiration of three years began farming, which he has continued up tp the present time. Im 1876 he purchased the farm of fifty acres, on which he now lives, and in 1882 was chosen magistrate of his district, and has faithfully discharged the duties of that office up tp the present time. He is a Democrat, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In 1881 he wedded Mary T. Kelley, a daughter of John and Susan Kelley. She was born in Tennessee in 1845, and is the mother of one child, named Lillie S., who was born in 1883.

Quarles, David T., sheriff of Lawrence County, was born in Giles County March 24, 1853, the son of Amon T. and Elizabeth (Vaughn) Quarles, natives of Virginia. The father lived upon a farm in Lawrence County, Tenth District, from 1868 until 1880, when his death occurred. David T. was reared upon a farm, securing during youth a limited education. At the age of eighteen years he began farming and stockraising for himself, which pursuits he followed until he was elected to the office, of sheriff in August in 1884. This position he has filled with honor to himself and satisfaction to his fellow citizens. His official term will expire in August 1886. In 1872 he was untied in marriage with Mary E. Meredith, a native of Georgia, by whom he has the following family: William L., Mary T., and Russell a. Mr. Quarles is a stanch Democrat and a useful citizen.

Rose, Judge Robert H., the oldest living member of the Lawrence County bar, was born in Brunswick County, Va., January 2, 1818, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Meredith) Rose. Our subject was reared in Giles County, and secured a good academical education in his youthful days. He was a soldier in the Florida war, and at its close, in 1836, he began the study of law. He entered the office of E. J. Shield, of Pulaski, member of Congress from this district, and was admitted to the Giles County bar in 1840. He remained and practiced law in that county until 1850, when he came to Lawrenceburg, and has since taken an active and leading part in representing his profession at the bar. In 1861 he was elected judge of this circuit, which office he held in an able manner until 1865, when he was elected chancellor of the district. In 1868 he with many others, was removed by Gov. Brownlow's orders, causing another election. Since then the Judge has been incessantly engaged in the practice of his profession, in which he has been justly successful. He is a Democrat in politics, an ancient Odd Fellow, and Episcopalian in his religious faith. He is a lawyer of ability and high standing in the profession.

Rose, Alfred H., merchant of Lawrenceburg, Tenn.,m was born in Brunswick County, Va., November 23, 1808, and is a brother of Judge, R.H. Rose, of Lawrenceburg, whose sketch appears elsewhere in these pages. Our subject's parents, William and Elizabeth (Meredith) Rose, were natives of the "Old Dominion." The father emigrated westward and located in Giles County, Tenn., with his family, in 1841. here our subject was reared and educated. After attaining his majority he located in West Tennessee, in Hardeman County, where he followed agricultural pursuits successfully for fifty-five years, although, like many others, his financial condition was sadly impaired during the late war. He was magistrate in Hardeman County for twenty-eight years, and for twelve years was chairman of the county court. He is, and always has been, an unswerving Democrat in politics, casting his first presidential vote for Jackson, in 1832, In June, 1884, he left Hardeman County, and after a short stay, both in Lawrence and Giles County, he engaged in the mercantile business in Lawrenceburg which he continued up to the present time. January 28, 1828, he married Mildred Eastham, of Virginia, who died in October, 1858. to this union were born eight children, three now living, viz.: W.S., Medora (wife of James J. McCollum) and Mary Ann (wife of Mc. Alexander). April 11, 1871, Mr. Rose married Mrs. Victoria Maddox, who died May 3, 1883. She left one son, Alfred P. Although Mr. Rose is comparatively a citizen of Lawrence County, he is one of the pioneers of Tennessee, and a reliable, enterprising citizen.

Schade, John Jr., editor and one of the proprietors of the Lawrence Union, of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., is a son of John Schade, Sr., a merchant of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., who was born in Germany, kingdom of Bavaria, October 24, 1838, and a grandson of George and Margaret (Rubbert) Schade, both natives of the same country. The father of our subject came to the United States in 1831 with his parents, and located in Baltimore, Md., where his parents died. He learned the shoe-maker's trade in that city, which he followed until the late war. He enlisted from Dayton, Ohio, in Company E, Fifty-eighth Ohio Regiment, and served nine months. He then resided in Ohio, being unfit for work on account of disabilities contracted during service. In 1872 he came to Lawrenceburg and followed his trade until 1880, when he engaged in his present business. In 1860, he married Christina Ziegler, a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, and this union resulted in the birth of five children: John, Charles C., Joseph B., Mary C., and Theresa B. John Schade, Sr., is a Republican in politics, but of rather independent views. Himself and family are members of the Catholic Church. Our subject, John Schade Jr., was born in Dayton, Ohio, October 10, 1872. He received a good German and English education, and in 1880 began learning the printer's trade, working on the Lawrence Press one year. In 1882 he worked on the Pulaski Herald, but return to the Lawrenceburg Press during 1883 and 1884. During 1885 he was in the mercantile business, and in February, 1886, he, in company with his brother, Joseph B., bought out the Lawrenceburg Press office, and established the Lawrence Union, which they have since conducted successfully as a Republican paper. August 7, 1883, John, Jr. married Lizzie Cook, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and two children (twins), named Henry and Christina, were born to this union. In politics our subject is a stanch Republican, and he and family are members of the Catholic Church.

Sexton, William R. is one of six children of John J. and Elizabeth A. (Yeager) Sexton, and of English and German Descent. He was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., November 6, 1843, and attended the common schools in boyhood. He learned the tanner's trade and followed that occupation many years. He served in the Confederate Army in the Thirty-second Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and was captured at the fall of Fort Donelson, and kept prisoner at Camp Morgan, Indianapolis, Ind., for seven months, when he was exchanged at Vicksburg, and was afterward at Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Moulton, Athens and Johnsonville, and was severely wounded on the march to Nashville, which disabled him from further service. January 1, 1865, he was untied in marriage to Mary E. Sparkman, daughter of James G. and Delany M. Sparkman, and to them were born the following family: Alice J., born April 15, 1868, Edward H., born July 27, 1870, and Lewis A., born March 25, 1874. Mrs. Sexton was born i! n Williamson County, Tenn., June 11, 1844, and she and her husband and daughter are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Sexton is a Mason and a Democrat, and is the owner of 225 acres of fertile land. His father was born in Tennessee, in 1820, was a farmer by occupation. He moved to Arkansas in 1851, but soon returned to Tennessee, thence to Alabama, and in 1861 return ed to Tennessee, where he resided until his death, October 23, 1868. His wife was born in Lincoln County, in 1824, and is still living on the old homestead. She and her husband were active and useful members of the Primitive Baptist Church.

Simms, John B. is a native of Lawrence County born November 22, 1859, being the son of Paris L. and Mary E. (McGlamery) Simms, natives of Tennessee. The father came to this country in 1848 and followed farming until 1877, when his death occurred on February 14 of that year. He was a Whig before, and a strong Union man during the war. He was a magistrate about sixteen years, and was chairman of the county court three or four years, and was one of the most substantial citizens of the county. John B. was given an academic education in his youth. At the age of twenty-one years he began the study of law in the office of Capt. Deavenport. In 1882 he was admitted to the bar, since which time he has continued in active practice. For twelve months he was in partnership with S.A. Carroll, Jr., and is at present associated with George T. Hughes, of Columbia. July 22, 1885, he married Mannie F., daughter of Capt. Deavenport. They have one daughter. Mr. Simms is a Republican. In 1881-82 he served as sergeant-at-arms of the Tennessee House of Representatives, being elected without solicitation on his part. Since 1884 he has held the office of county entry-taker. He is the local counsel of the Nashville & Florence Railroad Company. He is a rising attorney.

Smith, William was born in the Hoosier State in 1810, and is the youngest of six children of James and Martha (Gilbert) Smith, and is of English descent. His parents were born in North Carolina, where they were married, but reared their family in Tennessee. Previous to this they resided a short time in Indiana, but finally moved to Mississippi, where the mother died in 1850, and the father a few years later. Our subject received a limited early education and made his home with his parents until he attained his majority, when he began farming on his own account, and now owns 860 acres of land, which are furnished with a number of fine inexhaustible springs. Mr. Smith wedded Alice Nelson in October 1833. She was born in Lawrence County in 1817, daughter of John Nelson, one of the prominent farmers of the county. Their union has been blessed with fourteen children, only eight now living: Louisa W., Martha J., James H., William R., Calvin T., Samuel J., Andrew J., and John N! . M r. and Mrs. Smith have resided on their present farm since 1844, and are yet quite hale and vigorous. Mr. Smith was too old to take part in the late war, but his sons, Robert W. and William R. both served. The former died soon after enlisting, and the latter served four years. Previous to the war our subject was an old line Whig and did all is his power to prevent his State from seceding, but after it was inevitable he espoused the cause of the Confederacy. Since that time he has voted the Democratic ticket.

Smith, William R., a prominent and energetic farmer of Lawrence County, Tenn., is a native of the county, born February 22, 1841, the second son of William and Allie (Nelson) Smith, both born in Tennessee. The father was one of the pioneer settlers, and his lived on his present farm, near Lawrenceburg, since he was eight years of age. Both parents are yet living and are hale and hearty. Up to the age of twenty years our subject resided on a farm, and secured a common school education. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in Company I, Third Tennessee Regiment, and served first as private, and afterwards as sergeant. He was captured at Fort Donelson, and for seven months was imprisoned at Camp Douglas, Chicago. He was exchanged at Vicksburg, and was made sergeant of Company K, Third Tennessee Regiment, and remained such until October, 1864, when he was taken prisoner at Jonesboro, and remained in captivity until the close of the war. He then returned home and farme! d on his father's land until 1867, when he purchased a farm in Alab ama. In 1877 he purchased his present place, on which he has been extensively engaged in farming and stock raising. In 1867 he united his fortunes with those of Miss Ruth Springer, and seven children blessed their union, two of whom are dead. Those living are A. Wildie, Robert N., Jonas C., Lousia and Mary T. Matilda J. died in August 1885, and Sarah C. in April, 1870. Mr. Smith is a Republican of the old Whig type, and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

Sowell, Henry B., attorney at law, of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., was born in Hickman County, Tenn., July 24, 1854, and is a son of Hon. Joseph M. and Mary A. (Blakely) Sowell, natives respectively of North Carolina and Maury County, Tenn., the father being reared, however, after his third year, in Maury County, where he he resided until his marriage. After a short residence in Hickman County, he removed to Lawrence County in 1854, where he has since resided. He has twice represented the county in the State Legislature. Our subject was reared in Lawrence County, and educated in its schools. He completed an academical course of learning, at Columbia, in 1876, and in 1877 began reading law here with Judge John T. Allen, with whom he remained as pupil until 1878. He was then admitted to the Lawrence County bar, and entered actively into the practice of his profession, which he has continued with very flattering success to the present time. In 1885, he formed his present partnership with J.B. Parker, and has contributed largely to the established success of this well known legal firm. Mr. Sowell is, and always has been, a stanch and uncompromising Democrat in politics. He held the office of circuit court clerk of this county by appointment part of 1884. He has also held the office of magistrate for the last four years. Perhaps no man in the county is better acquainted with the books and affairs in the various county offices, as he has held irregularly the position of deputy in nearly all the offices. He is recognized in the county as an active party leader, an enterprising citizen, and an able member of the Lawrence County bar. He is a steward in the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and one of the county's best citizens.

Springer, Aaron F., a prominent planter, and native of the county in which he resides, was born near his present residence December 3, 1836, being the fourth of eleven children of Jacob and Melinda C. (Todd) Springer, who were born in South Carolina in 1808 and 1812, respectively. The father came to Lawrence County, Tenn., when about sixteen years of age, and here married, and reared his family, and died October 5, 1869. His wife's death occurred at the old homestead June 11, 1865. Aaron F. Springer has made farming his chief calling through life. Mary S.A. Carroll became his wife May 10, 1860, and their union was blessed in the birth of eleven children: James C., Mollie., Robert C., Lillie S., Sallie E., Alix C., Emma B., and Alive Leslie and three who are dead. The mother of these children was born in Lawrenceburg in 1843, and is the daughter of Judge Stephen A. Carroll, who was born in Lawrence County in 1817, and served as clerk and judge of the county court. Our subject served in the Confederate Army in the Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, and was in the battles of Franklin and Nashville. He was captured at one time and held prisoner at Rock Island, Ill., for about four months. He was paroled at Gainsville, Ala. He is an old line Democrat and a member of the F.& A. M. fraternity. He owns 500 acres of land, on which he raises the cereals and live stock. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

Stewart, William A., lawyer and postmaster of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., and a native of Lawrence County, of the same State, is a son of Daniel M. and Sarah F (Evans) Stewart, natives, respectively, of Tennessee and North Carolina. The father was reared in this county, and early in life adopted the medical profession. He practiced here until 1876, when he removed to Denton County, Tex., where he now resides. His only brother, john W. Stewart, a highly enterprising and public-spirited citizen of Lawrence County, was sheriff of that county during the war, and held the office of surveyor regularly from the time he attained his majority until his death, in November, 1884. Our subject's grandfather, Alexander Stewart, came to Lawrence County about 1820, and here he resided, following farming, until shortly before his death, which occurred in Alabama October 14, 1883. Our subject was reared and educated in this county, completing an academic course at the West Point High School. At the age of twenty he began the study of law with a view of making it a profession. He read law in the office of Judge R.H. Rose, and in 1872 was admitted to practice in Lawrence County courts and entered regularly in the practice of his profession, first with W.C. Davis, but soon after with his former preceptor, until 1879, since which time Mr. Stewart has been engaged in the practice alone. He is a Democrat in politics, although his ancestors were of the Whig stock. His father and uncle were both in the Confederate service during the late war. In August, 1885, our subject was appointed, by President Cleveland, postmaster at Lawrenceburg, which position he now fills. At the same time he became connected with the Lawrence Democrat in the capacity of associate editor and publisher, having contributed equally with others to the success of this official organ of democracy in Lawrence County. January 1, 1880, he married Loulie S. Parkes, a native of Giles County, Tenn., Two children, Jennie L. and Parkes Evans, were born to this union. Mr. Stewart is a member of the K. of H., and himself and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

Stribling, Col. James L., a prominent and well known citizen of Lawrence County, Tenn., was born in Giles County, March 9, 1829, son of Obadiah T. and Mary (Smithson) Stribling, natives respectively of South and North Carolina. The father came to Tennessee in 1818 and practiced medicine there in Athens, Ala., until 1829, when he came to Lawrenceburg, where he resided at the time of his death July, 1833. James L. has made his home in Lawrence County since 1843. In 1847 he and W.P. Horne purchased the Middle Tennessean, a weekly newspaper, in the interest of the Whig party, and the only paper printed in the judicial circuit at that time. The paper has been established in 1845, by Dr. W. P. Rowls, John A. Tinnon, Lee M. Bentley and Horne & Harrison. Col.. Stribling purchased Mr. Harrison's interest and continued the publications of the paper until 1850, when the firm sold to Hatcher & Jarrett. After retiring from the newspaper business Col. Stribling engaged in farming, but ! in 1 872 returned to Lawrenceburg and engaged in the hotel business, and continued successfully about six years. Since that time he has given his time and attention to farming and general trading. In August, 1885, he became connected with the grist mill of Lawrenceburg, being a partner of Daniel Guthrie. July 15, 1849, he married Mary J. Alexander, of Maury County, who bore him six children: Edward L., Mary A., Fannie K. (Mrs. a. M. Looney), James H., Rose E. and Robert Lee. The Colonel is a Democrat but previous to the war was a Whig.

Sykes, William H., of Athen, Ala., formerly a resident of Lawrence County, was born in Dayton , Ohio, August 10, 1842, son of James and Elizabeth (Mulholland) Sykes, natives respectively of England and Pennsylvania. The father came to Lawrence County in 1843, and engaged in cotton manufacture northeast of Lawrenceburg at Oak Factory. He was a useful citizen and died in 1865. William H. was reared in this county, securing a academic education. After his father's death he assumed control of the Crowson Cotton Mills, which were built by the father in 1856. Since he father's death he has managed these mills. He used 350 to 400 bales of cotton per year, manufacturing yarns, carpet-warps and batting, finding his principal market in Cincinnati. He uses water power and employs about twenty-five hands. June 8, 1875, Mrs. Sykes married Jennie P. Hayes, of Athens, Ala., who has borne her husband three children--one son and two daughters. He is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Tarpley, John P. was born in the "Old Dominion" November 21, 1804. His father was a soldier of the Revolutionary war, and came to Tennessee in 1808, and for three years was reside of Nashville, when which consisted of a few scattered log houses. A few houses marked the cities of Franklin and Columbia, and the city of Pulaski was an uninterrupted cane brake. Our subject is the fourth of twelve children of Alexander and Elizabeth (Abernathy) Tarpley, and is of English descent. The mother was a daughter of William Abernathy, a prominent citizen of Giles County, who lived a long and useful life. Our subject received a common school education, and by energy and economy is now the owner of 437 acres of land. He has been twice married, the first time to Temperance M. Stone, in 1827, daughter of Thomas Stone, of Virginia. Their children are as follows: William A., Elizabeth Anges (Mrs. Robert Johnson), Catherine D. (Mrs. James Parks), Leonidas J., Sarah P. (Mrs. M.B. Harvey) and John R. Leonidas was killed at the battle of Perryville, and Benjamin M. at the battle of Shiloh, during the late war. Mr. Tarpley's marriage to Helen M. Black, in 1857, resulted in the birth of three children: Charles C., Thomas D. and Mary V. Mr. Tarpley is an old line Democrat, and is a man noted for his integrity and fair dealing.

Tidwell, Darling M. is a son of Vincent and Phoebe (Rackley) Tidwell. The father was born in the Palmetto State, and was an early pioneer of Tennessee. Of their twelve children eight of them lived to be grown, and six served in the Confederate Army. Vincent Tidwell and his wife died in 1783 and 1883, respectively. Darling M. Tidwell was born in Tennessee in 1832, and in 1850 wedded Roxanna W. McCracken, born in Tennessee in 1835, daughter of Calvin and Amanda (English) McCracken. Mr. and Mrs. Tidwell had eighteen children: John V., Phoebe E., Mary J., James C., Calloway H., Frances L., Thomas M., Charles W., and William J. (twins), Andrew J., Robert E.L., C.D., Wiley N., Emma L., Lula and Nancy D. Two died in infancy. Eleven of these children are living, and five are married. Our subject began doing for himself at the age of eighteen, and by perseverance and energy accumulated considerable property. When about twenty-eight years of age he was appointed deputy sheriff, and held the office about six years, after which he was elected constable of his district, holding that position about four years. He served in the late war in Company D, Biffles Cavalry, and participated in many hotly contested battles. After his return he was constable of his district about two years. In 1873 he purchased the farm on which he now lives and which contains 1,110 acres. He deals extensively in cattle and mules, and in 1880 began merchandising on his farm, but now is closing out. In June, 1878, wife died. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a Democrat in politics. His children are all living in this State. John B. moved to Texas in 1876, and died in 1878, leaving a widow and three children to mourn his loss. They are now living in Tennessee.

True, T.K. is a son of David H. and Ellen (Glasscock) True, and was born in Maury County, Tenn., June 16, 1839. The father was a Virginian and came to Tennessee when quite young with his father, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. David H. was a farmer and followed merchandising and stock trading for many years. He died in 1871, and his wife five years later. Our subject became the architect of his own fortunes at the age of twenty-one, and followed farming up to the breaking out of the late civil war, when he enlisted as a private in Company K, Forty-eighth Tennessee Regiment, and acted as adjutant the greater part of the war, yet held no commission. He participated in many hard-fought engagements, and returned home May 19, 1865, and associated himself with Thomas H. Payne (present State superintendent of schools) and opened a high school at West Point, Tenn. Ten months later he was licensed to preach and was an itinerant minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church South for several years. He was recently employed by the I.O.O.F. Grand Lodge as State lecturer, and visited various portions of the State in behalf of that organization, doing very effective work. Since 1872 he has resided on his farm of 110 acres on Factory Creek. Mr. True is a Democrat and Prohibitionist.

Vaughn, Theodore D., farmer and native of the county in which he resides, was born 1840, son of Thomas and Mary A. Vaughn, who were Tennesseans by birth and died in 1863 and 1862, respectively. Our subject was reared in his parent's farm, and resided with then until 1861, when he entered the Confederate service and participated in the battle of Fort Donelson. He was the captured and taken to Camp Douglas, where he remained six months and was taken to Vicksburg and exchanged. Here the company reorganized and took an active part in the battle of Chickasaw Bayou and was in several other engagements, the most noted of which was Murfreesboro. On Hood's retirement from Tennessee Mr. Vaughn gave up army life and has since been a tiller of the soil. In 1876 he purchased his farm of 100 acres, on which he raises principally corn and cotton. In 1866 Araminta T. Hail became his wife: she was born in Tennessee in 1847, and is a daughter of John A. and Martha Hail. Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church south, and in politics Mr. Vaughn has always favored Democratic principles.

Welch, John W., M.D., was born in Tennessee in 1829, son of John L. and Rachel (Archer) Welch, born in South Carolina and Georgia, respectively. John L. Welch came to Tennessee with his parents in 1806. He was a farmer and lived in Lawrence County until his death in 1876. His wife died in 1873. After residing on the farm for some time John W. attended the Jackson Academy at Lawrenceburg. In 1851 he began the study of medicine under Dr. H.H. Dodson and later under Dr. W. P. Hale, and began practicing at Pleasantville, Hickman County, where he remained two years. He then practiced in Linden, Perry County, four years. He then enlisted in N.N. Cox's Company of Cavalry, remaining twelve months, and at the reorganization of the battalion he was elected first lieutenant. A year later he was discharged under the conscript law and came home, remaining seven months. He then enlisted in Company B, Twenty-third Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and remained in the service until October, 1864, when he was taken sick and was in the hospital at Richmond until the surrender. After being kept a prisoner about one month he took the oath of allegiance and returned home. He was married in 1852 to Elizabeth McMackin, born in Tennessee in 1835. the following are their children: John A., Martha E., Mary J., James A., Albert S. (deceased), Ben T., Josephine R. (deceased), George A., Kate E., and Elroy E. In 1870 Dr. Welch purchased his farm of 275 acres, and in 1881 he formed a partnership with his brother, George K. Welch, in the merchandise business in Chinnabee, and has met with fair success. Doctor Welch inherited about $1,600 from his father's estate, but the most of his property has been gained through his own exertions. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he is a Democrat.

Welch, George K., merchant, is a Tennessean, born in 1843 [see sketch of J.W. Welch for parent's biography], and resided with his father on a farm until eighteen years of age, at which time he enlisted in the Confederate service and was in some of the hardest fought battles of the war, Shiloh, Chickamauga, and Murfreesboro being the principal ones. He served through the entire war and surrendered with Gen. Lee at Appomattox Court House. He returned home and attended school for some time, and has followed clerking, milling, farming and merchandising, having a general stock of goods in the village of Chinnabee, his brother, J. H. Welch, being in partnership with him. In 8171 he wedded Maggie E. Shannon, daughter of Gazaway and Jane Shannon. Mrs. Welch was born in 1850, and is the mother of five children: Ella J, (deceased), Maude E., Leonard G., Rachel J. and Fannie E. Mr. Welch has served as deputy county clerk under S.A. Carroll. He is a Democrat and a strong supporter of prohibition. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

White, Augustus J., M.D., is a son of George O. and Mary A. (Cole), White, who were born in Massachusetts and New York October 23, 1817, and February 27, 1820, respectively. The father came to Tennessee in 1837 and started the Sycamore Cotton Mills and built the Sycamore Powder mills. After living alternately in Massachusetts and Tennessee until 1854, he took up a permanent residence in Tennessee and died in Lawrence County April 4, 1886. The mother now resides on the home place. Augustus J. was born in Massachusetts June 26, 1852, and there resided until eight years of age, when he was brought to Tennessee, and has since made the State his home, with the exception of one year spent in California. He has very vivid recollection of the late war, although too young to take part in the same. His early education was obtained in the common schools, but later he was taught by Capt. Thomas H. Paine, present State superintendent of public instruction for Tennessee. He began studying medicine under Dr. James E. Edwards, and later graduated from the medical department of the University of Tennessee (now Vanderbilt). June 26, 1872, he wedded Lena J. Moss, born in Franklin, Tenn., December 12, 1852, daughter of A.W. Moss, and to them were born five children, three of whom are living: Lena Gertrude, Lyndal Warren and Carrie May Cleveland. Dr. White is a farmer and Democrat, and a successful physician. His wife is a member of the Christian Church.



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