Goodspeed's Biographies of
Lauderdale Co., TN

John H. Farmer, a farmer and prominent business man of Chestnut Bluff, Crockett Co., Tenn., was born in Williamson County, Tenn., April 14, 1838, and was the oldest child of a family of seven sons and four daughters born to H. E. and Minerva A. (Mallory) Farmer, and is of French-Irish descent.  His father was born and partly raised in North Carolina, but his parents moved to Williamson County when he was a boy, and he was educated there, also married there, and lived in that county until 1858, when he moved to Mississippi, and from there to Crockett County, Tenn., where he still lives.  The mother was a native of Virginia, and is still living in Crockett County.  Our subject, John H. Farmer, was raised on a farm, and received a good education.  He has always farmed in connection with merchandising and other business, and for four years has been a magistrate in his district.  He was in the Confederate Army, and was in the Forty-seventh Tennessee Infantry, but was soon released on account of disability.  February 16, 1864, he was married, in southern Illinois, to Miss Sara Lee, daughter of Peter Lee, a farmer and merchant Tamaroa, Ill.  Mrs. Farmer was born in Illinois in 1846, and belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church.  Mr. Farmer is in politics a Republican, and cast his first presidential vote for John Bell.  He owns 2,100 acres of land, and raises cotton and grain.  He is a member of the board of management, and a stockholder in the Forked Deer Flouring-mills, located at Dyersburg, Tenn., and is a man of fine business qualifications.

 Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Peter Fitzpatrick, a venerable farmer, who was a pioneer of Lauderdale County, is a son of Edmund and Nancy (Oliver) Fitzpatrick.   The father was born in Pittsylvania County, Va., the mother in Charlotte County, Va.  They were married about 1785.  Four of the eleven children born to this marriage -- our subject and three sisters -- are living.  The mother belonged to the Primitive Baptist Church.  The father was a Democrat, and died in his sixty-sixth year, the mother living eight years after his death.  Our subject is of Scotch-Irish descent, and was born in Charlotte County, Va., April 18, 1805; was raised on a farm and well educated.  December 24, 1828, he married Miss Elizabeth Bruce, who was born in Charlotte County, Va., March 10, 1810.  Nine children were the result of this union -- two sons and a daughter now living: William H., born December 28, 1844; John B., born January 28, 1848, and Susan A., born in 1830 (she married T. L. Clark in 1846); Edward N., born October 6, 1829, died February 14, 1876, a magistrate of Lauderdale County, and a very prominent and successful farmer; Capt. Peter J., born October 27, 1833, killed at the battle of Perryville, Ky. -- was a talented and prominent young man, holding the rank of captain in the Confederate Army from Tennessee.  Mr. Fitzpatrick and wife came to Lauderdale County in 1847, settling two miles from Henning, Tenn., where he still lives.   Mrs. Fitzpatrick was a member of the Baptist Church, and died August 18, 1851.   In politics Uncle Peter, as he is familiarly called, is an emphatic Democrat.   He has been a citizen of Lauderdale County for thirty-nine years, and has been a farmer all of his life.  He owns 344 acres of good land, and is widely known all over the county, and affectionately esteemed as a kind-hearted, venerable man.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Benjamin M. Flippin, one of the early settlers of West Tennessee, is a son of John and Nancy (Neel) Flippin.   Both parents were born in East Tennessee; they ran down the Tennessee, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to the mouth of Forked Deer River, and up that river to Key Corner, arriving in  1822, when the surrounding country was a mass of cane and pea vines, full of wild animals and game.  They cleared a place and built a cabin, and in this wilderness raised their family of nine children; five boys and three girls lived to be grown.  Both parents were pious Methodists.  In 1837 the mother died, and three years later the father; and braver hearts, more devoted parents, never faced the hardships of Western wilds.  The Flippin family is of Irish extraction.  Our subject was the fifth son, and was born January 1, 1819 in Knox County, Tenn., and his early education was obtained from nature, as most of his time was spent in hunting game.  When only eighteen years old, he went on the river and followed keel-boating, flat-boating, etc.   In 1838 he married Eliza J. Caldwell, who was born January 16, 1825.  They had nine children; four boys and two girls lived to be grown, and all of the boys served their country in the late war.  Bird S. died a prisoner at Rock Island, Ill., and the other three escaped with a wound.  Both parents are Cumberland Presbyterians; in politics Mr. Flippin was a Whig, but since that party ceased he has been a Democrat.  For three years he was postmaster at Flippin, the office having been names in honor of him.   He has given his time to farming and trading in land and stock; he has won distinction as a veterinary surgeon in Lauderdale and adjoining counties, and as a business man has been quiet successful, though the war nearly ruined him.  Mrs. Flippin died in 1883, and he has remained a widower, being now sixty-seven years of age.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


B. J. Flippin, the oldest living child of the above, was born in Lauderdale County, October 4, 1841, was raised on a farm, and had few educational advantages.  He remained at home until 1861 when he went into the Confederate Army as second-lieutenant in the First Tennessee Heavy Artillery, and after the battle of Vicksburg he was made captain of Company F. Fifteenth Tennessee Cavalry, and held that rank to the end.  In 1864 he was captured in northern Mississippi, and held three months at Fort Delaware, but was exchanged at City Point, Va., then re-entered the service and made the final surrender at Gainesville, Ala.  Since the war his chief business has been railroading -- ten years of the time in Mississippi, and for three years he merchandised there.  In 1879 he moved to Haywood County, and farmed; in 1882 he took charge of the station at Flippin, where he is also engaged in merchandising.  In 1865 he married Miss Neeley Keeton, by whom he has two sons: Robert K., a student at McKenzie, and Benjamin M., educated at Janesville, Wis., and operator and railroad clerk at Ripley, Tenn.  Mr. and Mrs. Flippin are both Missionary Baptists.  While in Haywood county, he was road commissioner and tax collector, and for sixteen years has been in the employ of two railroad companies, as brakeman, yard-master, agent and conductor.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Thompson G. Gause, a citizen of Ripley, Tenn., is a son of John P. and Hannah J. (Green) Gause.  They were born, raised and married in North Carolina.  In 1839 they moved to Brownsville, Tenn., and made it their home.  Four sons and a daughter were born to them, and the parents and all of the children belong to the Methodist Church.  Mr. Gause was a lawyer of marked ability and a leading member of the Brownsville bar, a zealous worker in his church, and widely known for his piety.  He was in the Legislature while in North Carolina.  He died in 1855, and since his death the mother has lived with her children; she is now seventy years old.  Thompson G. Gause is of French descent on his father's side, and was born June 15, 1840, in Brownsville, and after attending the school there, completed his education at Murfreesboro; then engaged in farming.  In 1860 he married Sarah G. Moorer, born in 1842, and they have had three sons and two daughters; the entire family are Methodists.  In 1861 Mr. Gause volunteered in Company M, of Seventh Tennessee Cavalry (Confederate Army) but after a year's service his youngest brother took his place and returned to take care of his wife and mother, and farmed until 1882; then moved to Ripley, but continues farming in connection with his other business.  Before the war he was a Whig, but since then has been a Democrat.   Mr. Gause has been a resident of Lauderdale County for thirty-five years, he is a good business man, and a most worthy citizen and church member.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


J. E. Gillespie resides in the Eleventh District, and was born in Lauderdale County, July 28, 1842, and is a son of James and Minerva (Nelson) Gillespie, who were both natives of South Carolina, though his father was raised in North Carolina.  Our subject is of Irish descent, and was raised on a farm and worked for his father until twenty-six years of age, when he commenced farming for himself, and in 1867 he engaged in the cotton-gin business in connection with farming, and still successfully continues both.  Mr. Gillespie was married April 14, 1869, to Miss Jennie Lewton, daughter  of William and Martha Lewton.  They have five children: John May, Laura J.,, Florence Ella, Thomas B., Rilla Adell.  Mr. Gillespie is a man of strict integrity and generous disposition.   He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, in good standing, and of good social position.  His school advantages were limited, but he has always manifested a ready willingness to support and assist all enterprises for advancing the cause of education.  Politically Mr. Gillespie is a Democrat, and he is a worthy citizen of Lauderdale County.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Hon. P. T. Glass.   Among the most distinguished and respected citizens of Lauderdale County stands Hon. P. T. Glass, born in Halifax County, Va., October 18, 1824.  He was brought to Weakley County when only four years old, and educated at Dresden Academy; then attended the law school at Lexington, Ky., and was admitted to the bar in 1847, forming a partnership with Hon. Emerson Etheridge.  From youth he has held the confidence of the public and of friends.  When only eighteen he was colonel of the militia, and since then has faithfully served the people as magistrate and chairman of the county court; represented his district in the Legislature, and in the Forty-ninth Congress, being elected over Emerson Etheridge by a sound Democratic majority.  The interests of the people, opposition to monopolies and faith in the intelligence and virtue of the masses, have been his guide in all legislation.  In 1848 he married Sarah C. Partee, who was born April 3, 1831, and two sons were born to them.  She died in 1852, and in 1855 he married Maria Partee, a cousin of his first wife.  Two daughters was the result of this union, and after their mother died Mr. Glass married, in 1868, Susan T. Barbee.   His first two wives and himself were Missionary Baptists, his present wife a Methodist.  During the war, Mr. Glass served the Confederacy four years in the commissary department with rank of major.  When not serving the public he has engaged in farming and the mercantile business, having been a merchant at Ripley for twenty years.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Hiram D. Glass, a prominent dry goods and grocery merchant of Ripley, Tenn., is a son of Hon. P. T. and Sarah C. (Partee) Glass, and was born on September 12, 1849, in Ripley, where he was raised and received his first education, finishing his literary studies at the University of Mississippi, and in 1868 graduating from the commercial college at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and after acting as salesman and bookkeeper in several large houses, in 1873 he became the junior member in the firm of P. T. Glass & Son, and after several changes the firm assumed the present style of H. D. Glass & Co.  In 1872 he married Jennie H. Palmer, who was born October 3, 1851, and four sons and three daughters have brightened this union.  Mr. Glass is an enthusiastic Democrat, and with his wife belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church.  For fourteen years he has been one of the enterprising business men of Ripley.  He carries a splendid stock in two large rooms -- one filled with dry goods, the other with groceries, and has a branch store in Hansford, besides dealing in cotton very extensively.  In addition to his careful business training he has a natural capacity for commercial pursuits, and is a correct, successful business man.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


William R. Glenn is a son of David and Nancy (Rainey) Glenn, who were North Carolinians, born in 1800.   They were brought to Middle Tennessee in childhood and there married.  Of eleven children born to them -- five sons and six daughters -- six are living.  They were Methodists and the father was a Whig and a farmer, and owned 640 acres of land.   He died about 1863 and his widow in 1881.  Our subject is of Scotch-Irish descent on his father's side of the family.  He was born in Williamson County, January 29, 1837, and was reared on a farm.  He attended the common schools, and at the age of sixteen engaged as salesman in a dry goods store, continuing about two years.   He then turned his attention to farming, and in 1861 enlisted in the Confederate Army in Company J, Ninth Tennessee Infantry, serving nearly four years, and was neither wounded nor taken prisoner.  In 1870 he was united in marriage to Mary M. Graves who was born June 7, 1846.  They have one child, William E.  Both husband and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Mr. Glenn is a Democrat and cast his first vote for Fillmore.  He owns 225 acres of good farming land.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Coleman Hafford, one of the prominent farmers of Lauderdale County, was born in the county, November 30, 1841, and is the second member of a family of four sons and a daughter, born to William and Margaret (Tinsley) Hafford, and is of Irish descent.  His father was born in South Carolina, and after attaining his majority came to Tennessee.  He was married in Madison County, and soon after moved to Lauderdale County, where he raised his family and lived until he died in 1853.  The mother was born in Dickson County, Tenn., in 1814, and is still living with her children, and is a devout member of the Missionary Baptist Church.   Mr. Hafford was raised on a farm, and received a good education.  He enlisted in Company E, First Confederate Cavalry, under Col. Cox, and was in the battle of Perryville, was captured at Sparta and released on parole; served in the army over three years.  He was married in Lauderdale County, November 6, 1867, to Miss Nannie E. Mitchell, a daughter of Abram Mitchell.  She was born in Davidson County, May 6, 1846, and died February 2, 1884.  One son and three daughters were born to their marriage: William F., Nannie L., Olga and Mattie.  Mrs. Hafford was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and Mr. Hafford belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church.  He is a Democrat, and owns 265 acres of good land, 190 acres of it in the home-place, one mile southwest of Hall's Station.  He is a generous, upright man, highly esteemed by all who know him.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Tolbert F. Hall, a manufacturer, and member of the firm of Hall & Brandon, manufactures of pipe-staves, located at Hall's Station, on the Newport News & Mississippi Valley Railroad, was born in Gibson County, January 29, 1847, and was the second of four living children born to Hansford R. and Orpha Lucinda (Conley) hall, and is of English-Welsh descent.  The father was born in Rutherford County, May 20, 1818, and gave his time to farming, and now owns about 550 acres of good land.  Soon after his marriage, which occurred June 13, 1844, in Rutherford County, he moved to Gibson County and settled there.  He aided in the organization of Crockett County, and by the change, became a citizen of the new county.  In 1871, he moved to Lauderdale County, where he has since resided, and was one of the founders of Hall's Station, one of the flourishing business towns of the northern part of the county.  The place had to contend with strong competition with Gates, another small town of the county, but by the untiring energy of Mr. Hall, the difficulties have been overcome, and the town is now in a flourishing condition.  He is a Democrat and a Mason, and he and family, with one exception, are members of the Christian Church.  Our subject's mother was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., in the twenties.  Mr. Hall was raised and educated on a farm, remaining until twenty-two years old.  He was married in Rutherford County, March 23, 1870, to Miss Mary B. Brandon, daughter of W. G. Brandon, a contractor of public work.  Two sons and four daughters were born to them: William H., Conley, Eolian, Miriam, Tealey L. and Jewel.   Mrs. Hall was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., August 2, 1849.  Mr. and Mrs. Hall, are members of the Christian Church, and he is a Democrat.  He owns 750 acres of good land, with a nice residence and good improvements, and also owns Hall's Hotel, besides other residences and business houses at Hall's Station.  He is a liberal, upright man, and a most valuable citizen.  He has two sisters and one brother: Sara A. (Stephens), Tolbert F., Martha J., (Brandon) and John Leroy.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Ryland L. Halliburton, a farmer of Lauderdale County, is a son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Moore) Halliburton.  The father was a native of North Carolina, and the mother of Virginia.  They were both consistent members of the Missionary Baptist Church; the father was a soldier of the war of 1812; a farmer by occupation, his political views were Democratic.  R. L. Halliburton, the subject of this sketch, was born in Halifax County, Va., September 30, 1821, and was married to Susan F. Halliburton, in October 1844, the grand-daughter of Reuben Pickett, an eminent pioneer minister of the Missionary Baptist Church in Virginia.  In the year 1849 R. L. Halliburton removed with his family to Lauderdale County, Tenn., and engaged in farming, and has followed agricultural pursuits up to present writing.  He owns a magnificent body of farming lands situated one mile south of Ripley on the line of the Newport News & Mississippi Valley Railroad, well improved and with a splendid steam gin and mill thereon.  Mr. and Mrs. Halliburton have three living children -- two daughters and one son.  The mother, son and one daughter are members of the Baptist Church.  The other daughter, the wife of Dr. Morgan Cartwright, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.   Mr. Halliburton, in politics, is a conservative Democrat; is not a member of any denomination, but is a firm believer in the Bible  and the Christian religion.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Oliver T. Hendren was born in Rowan County, N. C., January 17, 1821, and was the fourth child of a family of six sons and four daughters born to Beal W. and Nancy T. (Hudson) Hendren, and is of Welsh descent, and by trade a machinist and carpenter.   His father was born in North Carolina, and moved to Madison County, Tenn., in March, 1826, but was raised and married in his native State.  His wife's parents were of Irish descent, but were born in North Carolina.  He was by trade a saddler, which he followed for fourteen years.  In 1828 he moved to Tipton County and engaged in farming until his death in 1842.  Our subject's mother was born in North Carolina and died in Lauderdale County, June 27, 1871.  Our subject received a common-school education; he learned the carpenter's trade in Fayette County, and the machinist's in Memphis.  He was married in Fayette County, December, 1842, to Agnes H. Gregory, a daughter of J. T. Gregory, a native of South Carolina.  Five sons and seven daughters were born to this marriage; nine of them living.  Mrs. Hendren was born in South Carolina, December 30, 1823, and died January 13, 1885.  Mr. and Mrs. Hendren belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  He is a Democrat and a Mason, and he has served as magistrate since 1853, except two years during the war, and was the founder of Curve, a station on the Newport News & Mississippi Valley Railroad, six and a half miles north of Ripley, and is one of the most respected and substantial citizens of that locality.  Mr. Hendren has 117 acres of land, and gives his chief attention to raising fruit.  He is an upright and industrious man.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


James O. Henry, one of the well known business men of Ripley, is a son of Alexander and Sarah (Carruth) Henry.  Both parents were born and raised in South Carolina, and moved to Wilson County, Tenn., when young, where they married.  In 1831 they moved to Madison County, and two years later to Lauderdale County, and five years later to Haywood County.  Five sons and three daughters were born to them; only two now living.  The father was a farmer and a Whig before the war, and a Democrat afterward.  He had three brave sons in the war; one held the rank of captain, and one of first lieutenant.  Mr. and Mrs. Henry were Presbyterians.  James O. Henry, is of Scotch-Irish descent, and was born in Madison County, Tenn., April 4, 1832, and was raised in Haywood County.  His educational advantages were limited; while growing up he learned the blacksmith's trade, and when twenty-one, commenced work for himself, and for thirty-five years has worked steadily at his trade.  In 1855 he married Martha Hendren, by whom he had one son and six daughters; the entire family are Methodists; he is a firm Democrat.  In 1860 he moved to Lauderdale County, and in connection with his trade farmed.  In 1881 he moved to Ripley, to educate his children; he opened a blacksmith shop, and also took boarders.  In 1884, he moved to the hotel which he now keeps, and is doing well, and he is also interested in the furniture business.  Mr. Henry has been a resident of this county for twenty-six years, and for five years has been intimately connected with the business interests of Ripley.  He is well known all over the county and highly respected.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Freland A. Henry,  junior member of the firm of Porter & Henry, druggists of Ripley, and only son of James O. and Martha E. (Hendren) Henry, was born October 31, 1856, in Haywood County, and was reared on a farm.  He attended the common schools, and at the age of twenty-one began for himself, and after taking a trip to Arkansas, returned and entered the store of Felsenthal, of Ripley, as salesman and book-keeper, for two years.  He opened a dry-goods house in 1881, under the title of Chapman & Henry, continuing about two years.  In June 1883 he bought a half interest in the drug store, which was managed for several years by Mr. Porter.  In 1883 Mr. Henry married Mary B. Porter, who was born January 1, 1865, and was a daughter of his partner.  Their union resulted in the birth of two children: Nellie P. and Courtenay.  Mr. and Mrs. Henry are members of the Methodist Church, and he is a Democrat.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


James D. Hubbard, one of the leading farmers of Lauderdale County, was born in Caswell County, N. C., May 10, 1809.  His father, William Hubbard, was born in Virginia, in 1787, and moved with his parents to North Carolina when a boy, where he married Nancy Qualls, a daughter of Abner Qualls, one of the Revolutionary soldiers, who fought through the entire war of independence.   Our subject and a sister, Charlotte W., who married Joshua Darden, were the children born to William and Nancy Hubbard.  The mother died in 1821, in Robertson County, and the father then married Mrs. Elizabeth Gunn, and by this union had three sons and three daughters: Freeman, Richard H., William, Polly Ann, Nancy C., and Lucinda.   The father came to Tennessee in 1813, and lived two miles below Nashville, on the Cumberland River, and after locating there joined Jackson's army for five years, and was on the forced march made by the troops to re-enforce the army at New Orleans, but before Mr. Hubbard's company reached there the battle of New Orleans had been fought, and liberty secured to the American people.  While Mr. Hubbard was in the army his family moved to Robertson County, Tenn., and settled near Red River, but in 1846 he, with his family, moved to Fayette County and settled eight miles north of Somerville, and died in 1850.   Our subject was raised on a farm, and had a common-school education.  After reaching his majority he learned the saddler's trade, which he followed thirty years.   He was married in Robertson County, February 18, 1851, to Miss Elizabeth A. Stoltz, daughter of Capt. J. H. Stoltz, a commissioned officer in Jackson's army.  Of nine children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hubbard six are living: Nancy T., James I., William E., Mary Emma, Robert L. and Edward C.  The mother was born in Robertson County, October 13, 1828.  Her father, Capt. J. H. Stoltz, was born in Stokes County, N. C., in 1783, and died at the old homestead in Robertson County, five miles west of Springfield, in 1862.   His wife, Nancy Dorris, was born north of Nashville in 1796, and died April, 1864.   The grandmother of Mr. Hubbard was Elizabeth Manesse, a sister of James Manese, who was thoroughly identified with the early history of Nashville, having lived there when the place was only a fort.  James D. Hubbard, our subject, is a Democrat.  He cast his first presidential vote for Henry Clay.  He is a Mason, and with his wife and all of his family, except one, belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Mr. Hubbard owns a fine farm of 211 acres on the Ripley and Key Corner road, thirteen miles north of Ripley, containing a finely improved residence.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


George Whitfield Hurt,  a farmer and mechanic of Lauderdale County, was born at Paducah, Ky., March 20, 1845, and was the sixth child of a family of eight sons and three daughters born to William W. and Sarah E. (Camburn) Hurt, and is of Irish descent.  His father was born in Maury County, Tenn., where he was raised and educated.  He then went to Graves County, Ky., where he married and lived for a short time before moving to Paducah, Ky., where he lived until 1856; then moved to Boonville, Mo., and a few years later came to Lauderdale County, where he is still living, three miles from Hall's Station.  Our subject's mother was born in Graves County, Ky., in 1812, and is still living.  George W. Hurt was raised and educated in Paducah, Ky., and has always been a farmer and a carpenter.  He has been married three times.  The first time, in McCracken County, Ky., to Virginia Potter, a daughter of Squire James Potter, a prominent farmer.  She was born in that county in 1848.  One daughter, Virginia, was born to this marriage.  Mrs. Hurt died in November, 1865, and December 17, 1866, he married in Lauderdale County, Miss Cornelia E. Jordan, a daughter of Dr. Thomas Jordan, a popular physician of Williamson County, Tenn.  Two sons and two daughters were born to this marriage: Mattie Y., Thomas Leonidas, Mary Florence and William Edmondson.  Mrs. Hurt, their mother, was born in Henderson County, Tenn., in 1844, and died in 1876.  Mr. Hurt was married again December, 1878, to Miss Addie Wright, a daughter of John Wright, a prominent farmer.   One son and three daughters were the result of this union; two of the latter were twins and died when four months old, within fifteen minutes of each other.  These children were named Myrtle and Beulah, Floyd C. and Bernice.  This wife was born in Lauderdale County, Tenn., in 1857, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Mr. Hurt is a Missionary Baptist, and a Democrat.  He owns a farm of sixty acres, and is a prosperous, liberal man.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


G. J. Hutcheson, a resident of the Tenth District, was born in Lauderdale County, October 1, 1842, and was the son of Jesse and Louisa Jane (Givens) Hutcheson; both of them were natives of Tennessee.  the father died in White County, Ark., in 1846.  The mother was born in 1819, and died in Lauderdale County, March 27, 1859.  Our subject is of Irish descent.  He was raised by his maternal grandfather on a farm until the war commenced, when he entered the Confederate service, going into the First Tennessee Heavy Artillery, Company A, and continued through the war.  He was captured at Vicksburg, Miss., July 4, 1863, and was almost immediately released and joined his company, but August 23, 1864, was captured at Port Morgan, Ala., and imprisoned at New Orleans.  From there he was sent to New York City; then to Elmira, N.Y.; then to Baltimore, Md., where he was held until the war was over, and was then released after the surrender.  After this he returned to Fulton and went into the livery stable business, running a hack line from Fulton to Brownsville, but in a few months resumed farming, which has since been his occupation.   He was married, December 26, 1866, to Miss Susan Bates, the daughter of James H. and Mary Joyce (Marshall) Bates, and five children were born to this marriage: Mary L., Robert Guilford (who died October 20, 1875), James A., Walter, Jennie Maud.  Mr. and Mrs. Hutcheson and all of the children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, he being a steward in the church, and he is also a member of the Masonic Lodge, No. 314, at Western Valley.  While his own advantages for attending school were limited, he takes a great deal of interest in the cause of education, and is a member of the board of school directors in the Tenth District.  He is a Democrat, and takes no active interest in politics.  Mr. Hutcheson is a self-made man.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Robert S. Irvin,  a merchant and also the postmaster at Curve, Tenn., was born in Appomattox County, Va., April 25, 1842.   His father, John Irvin, was born in Virginia, in 1809, and came to Tennessee in 1848, settling in Williamson County; in 1850, he moved to Warren County, and in 1854 to Haywood County, where he remained until 1874, the moved to Texas, locating in Victoria County, and died at Stockdale, Tex., March, 1879.  Our subject's mother's maiden name was Mary A. Steele; she was born in Appomattox Co., Va., and died in 1845.  Robert S. Irvin was raised and educated on a farm, and continued farming until 1878, and since that time has been in the mercantile business.  He enlisted in the Confederate Army, belonging to the Seventh Tennessee Infantry, under Col. Jackson, of Jackson, Tenn., and was at the battles of Belmont, Mo., Harrisburg, Miss., Corinth, Miss., and Franklin, Tenn., and after serving through the entire war, was surrendered with Forrest's troups, at Gainesville, Ala.  Mr. Irvin was married December 2, 1868, at Murfreesboro, Tenn., to Elizabeth Lackey, daughter of William Lackey, a prominent farmer.  She was born in Rutherford County, April 12, 1842, and with her husband belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Mr. Irvin is a member of the firm of Anderson & Irvin, grocery and hardware dealers.  He is also the postmaster at Curve, Tenn., six and a half miles north of Ripley.  In politics he is Democrat, and was the first one to open a store, at Curve, after the railroad was built, and by his capacity for business and strict integrity, has won the confidence and esteem of his community, and is a kind and liberal man.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


William H. Jackson,   clerk of the county court, of Lauderdale County, is a son of James D. and Frances (Wright) Jackson.  The father was born in Dinwiddie County, Va., in 1811, and his mother in Northhampton, Mass., in 1817.  She met Mr. Jackson in Virginia, while visiting there; they were afterward married in Massachusetts, then moved to Fayette County, Tenn., where the father died in 1847, and in 1870 the mother came to Ripley, to live with her son, and died in 1884; both were members of the Methodist Church, and he was a Democrat; a farmer by occupation.  Our subject was born August 20, 1838, in Fayette County, Tenn., had the best educational advantages the county schools afforded, and at the age of sixteen entered a wholesale and retail dry goods house at Memphis, where he remained a year, then taught school for three years; then was book-keeper for a railroad contracting company.   In 1860 he went to Texas and Mexico for his health, but in 1861 volunteered in Company B, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry (Confederate Army).  Three of his brothers were in the same company, and all went through the war without being wounded.  After his return, in 1865, he married Catherine E. Palmer, who was born in 1843.  No children have been born to this marriage, and both Mr. and Mrs. Jackson are members of the Methodist Church.  Soon after they married they settled on the farm near Ripley, but two years later moved to town, and Mr. Jackson engaged in the grocery business for six years, the greater part of the time in partnership with Maj. Wardlaw.  In 1882 he was elected to the office of county court clerk, and re-elected in 1886.  For twenty-one years he has been a resident of Lauderdale County, and the citizens of his county have shown their appreciation of him, as a man, and their confidence in his ability and integrity, by electing and re-electing him to the responsible office of county court clerk.  Mr. Jackson is of a genial, social disposition, and is fond of hunting and fishing.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


James M. Jenkins, ex-trustee of Lauderdale County, is a son of Samuel D. and Helen (Brockinton) Jenkins, who were both natives of South Carolina.  The father was born in 1808, and the mother in 1811.   They married and settled in their native State, and had a family of eight children -- three boys and five girls.  The mother died in 1846, and in 1848 Mr. Jenkins married Elizabeth Beasley, and to this marriage two sons and four daughters were born.   In 1850 they moved to Lauderdale County.  The father and both his wives were Methodists, and he was an old Jeffersonian Democrat.  By trade he was a finished carriage maker, but later in life gave his time to farming; he died in 1882.  Both of our subject's grandfathers were Methodist preachers.  The Jenkins family have supplied the church with a number of ministers; his grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war.  Our subject is of Scotch descent, and was born June 11, 1841, in Darlington County, S. C.; was raised on a farm; had few educational advantages, having attended school only a few months, but has since acquired a practical business education.   In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate service, in Company G, Fourth Tennessee Infantry, but after a year's service was sent home on account of sickness, and commenced farming.  In 1862 he married Mary J. Meadows, who was born July 21, 1843, in Lauderdale County.  Of nine children born to them, two boys and two girls survive.   Both parents are Methodists.  Mr. Jenkins is a Democrat.  In 1878 he was elected trustee of the county, and gave such entire satisfaction as an officer that he was re-elected four times.  In 1880 he moved to Ripley, where he owns 380 acres of good land, but has given most of his time to official duties; has been a resident of Lauderdale County for thirty-seven years, and is one of her most substantial citizens.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Rev. George Johnston, one of the old and prominent citizens of Ripley, Tenn., and senior member of the firm of George Johnston & Co., furniture dealers, was a son of George and Jane (Thompson) Johnston, both parents being natives of Orange (now Alamance) County, N. C.  The father was born in 1793, the mother in 1798.  They passed their lives quietly on a farm, free from ostentatious display, and while firm believers in the doctrine of the Presbyterian Church, they never attached themselves to any local organization.  Four sons and a daughter were born to them, three now living.  The father died in 1827, and in 1831 the mother married William Russell, by whom she had four children.  In 1848 they moved to Arkansas, where she died in 1882.  The Johnston family are of Virginia stock, probably of same origin as Joseph E. Johnston's family.  Our subject was born in Orange (now Alamance) County, N. C., March 2, 1821.  His early life was spent on a farm; at seventeen he commenced to learn the cabinet-maker's trade, and after a two years' apprenticeship he worked as journeyman, until he commenced for himself in 1840.  The next year he married Elizabeth, daughter of Arthur Lindsley, born in 1819, by whom he had four sons and three daughters.  In 1848 he moved to Hardeman County, Tenn., and the next year to Lauderdale County, and worked at his trade, farmed and taught school until 1860, when he was elected county court clerk, and held the office ten years.  In 1839 he was converted, and united with the Methodist Protestant Church.  In 1845 he began to preach, and in 1847 was ordained deacon.  In 1851 he was recognized by the Memphis Annual Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church South, held at Paducah, Ky., as worth of the position in that church, and was ordained elder at the annual conference held at Jackson, Tenn., in 1856.  In 1878 he opened a furniture store at Ripley, Tenn., and has since done an active business.  In 1878 his wife died, and the next year he married, in Gibson County, Mrs. Pauline J. Smith, who was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., in 1825, and died in 1884.  Both wives were members of the Methodist Church South.  Mr. Johnston, has been an earnest student of theology nearly all of his life; his ministerial work has always been a free offering, and he is the oldest resident minister in the county of any denomination, and whilst he is a pronounced Methodist in his religious views, he lives in charity with all denominations of Christians.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Stephen A. Jordan, a substantial farmer at Hall's Station, Lauderdale County, on the Newport News & Mississippi Valley Railroad, was born in Williamson County, Tenn., February 4, 1825, and was the ninth child of fifteen children, born to Stephen and Anna (Dean) Jordan, and is of Irish descent.   His father was born in Halifax County, Va., and came to Tennessee with his parents when a boy; he was raised and married in Williamson County, and died there in 1848, and the mother died in 1840.  Our subject was raised on a farm and well educated at Hardeman academy.  He entered the Confederate Army, Fifteenth Tennessee Cavalry, and served over three years; was in the battles at Columbia, Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville.  September 8, 1846, he married in Williamson County, Miss Mary M. Caruthers, daughter of Robert Caruthers, a farmer.  Four sons and four daughters were born to this marriage: Martha J. (Mitchell), William J. (who died October 1884), Joseph B., Robert C., Emmerson F., Annie E. (Dunavant), Cora S. (Nunn), and Mary L.  Mrs. Jordan was born in Williamson County, May 4, 1828.  Mr. and Mrs. Jordan, and all but two of the children, belong to the Missionary Baptist Church.  He is a Democrat, and owns 300 acres of fine land, raising stock and grain, and has lived at his present homestead since 1839.  He is a liberal man, and a man of strict integrity.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


H. W. Keller, a farmer of Lauderdale County, is a son of Irmi and Virginia H. (Posey) Keller.  His father was born in Abbeville, S. C., in 1808, and the mother in 1812.  They were married in Tipton County, Tenn., in 1832, and of four children born to them our subject is the only one living.  Mrs. Keller died June 10, 1837, and with her husband belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church.  After her death Mr. Keller, Sr., took charge of a plantation in Mississippi, where he met an untimely death at the hands of a negro slave in 1838.  In politics he was a Whig.  Our subject, H. W. Keller, is of Scotch-Irish descent on his father's side, and was born in what is now Lauderdale County, Tenn., December 13, 1835, just before the organization of the county from Tipton County.  He was raised on a farm by his uncle, Col. H. C. Keller, as his parents died when he was small.  He received a good education.  December 19, 1860, he married Miss Roberta C. Burks, who was born in Haywood County, Tenn., in February, 1840, and they had eleven children -- four sons and seven daughters -- three sons and four daughters are now living.  In 1862 Mr. Keller enlisted in Haywood's company, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry (Confederate Army), and was in the service until 1863, receiving no wounds.  After the siege of Vicksburg, he returned home and resumed farming.  Mr. and Mrs. Keller belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  In politics he is a Democrat.  He owns 400 acres of very rich land, and has been a resident of Lauderdale County all his life, being well known all over the county, and greatly respected by all who know him.  He is a Mason, having taken the Royal Arch degree, also a member of the Henning Lodge, K. of H.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Alex Lackey, a native of South Carolina, was born in 1771, and in 1800 came to Rutherford County, Tenn., where he married Miss Kelton, by whom he had three sons: James A., William K. and Alex R.  This wife died about 1816, and four years later he married Eleanor Garmany, who bore him one son and five daughters.  The father and both his wives were members of the Old Presbyterian Church.  He and Gen. Andrew Jackson raised the first house in Murfreesboro.  He served during the war of 1812, and was a farmer through life.  He was a Jacksonian Democrat in politics, and died in 1853.  His wife died in 1840.  James A., the eldest son of the first marriage, was born February 14, 1809, in Rutherford County.   When young he began the study of medicine, and after graduating at the Transylvania Medical College in 1836, he came to Lauderdale County, and located in Ripley a short time after.  He practiced in the county for forty-eight years, and was one of the most successful and popular physicians, and a highly useful citizen.  In early life he filled the offices of postmaster, magistrate, and later had the honor of representing Lauderdale and Dyer Counties twice in the State Legislature; first in 1858-59, and in 1868-69.  Politically he was an old line Whig and a strong Union man, but after the war he became a Democrat.  He was of a very sympathetic nature, forgetting his own interests in his efforts to forward those of others.  In 1842 he married Rebecca Richardson, by whom he had one daughter, who married and died without issue.  His death occurred in 1885.  The youngest son of the father's second marriage was Dr. Benjamin F. Lackey, one of the leading physicians of Lauderdale County, born June 15, 1836, in Rutherford County.  His boyhood days were spent on a farm, and his early educational advantages were fairly good.  After the death of his father he went to school for some time in Murfreesboro, and in 1854 came to Lauderdale County, and three years later began the study of medicine under his brother, James A.  He took one course of lectures in 1858-59 at Nashville, and the latter year entered the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, Penn., and graduated in 1860.   The same year he began practicing at Ripley, and in 1861 was appointed to the position of surgeon in the First Confederate Cavalry.  In December, 1862, he became surgeon of Whatron's brigade of cavalry, and the March following was promoted to chief surgeon of the first division of cavalry, holding that position till he was paroled at Atlanta, Ga., in April, 1865.   He was twice captured during his service, but was only held a few days each time.   He has since practiced medicine in Ripley.  In 1867 he married Victorine D. Wade, who was born January 1, 1846, in Davidson County, Tenn., and to them two children: James H. and Laura V.  In 1879 his wife died, and the following year he married Agnes F. Lynn, who was born March 9, 1845, near Knoxville, though raised and educated in Illinois.  No children have blessed this union.  The Doctor owns about 1,500 acres of land.  His wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


W. E. Lambeth, a merchant of Golddust, was born December 8, 1849, in Lebanon, Tenn., being the youngest of three children born to James T. and Susan E. Lambeth.  The father was a Tennessean, born in 1809, and died in 1857, at Lebanon, Tenn.  The mother was born in Wilson County, in 1825, and is still living in Lambethville, Crittenden Co., Ark.  Our subject was raised at Lebanon, Tenn., and remained there until 1858, when he went to Elizabethtown, Ill., to attend school, remaining until 1861, when he went to Cave-In-Rock, Ill., and with his brothers, James T., Jr., and Warren Lambeth, he engaged in farming and speculating, until 1872, when he went to college at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., remaining until 1873.  Mr. Lambeth then invested with his brothers in saw-mill property in Weston, Ky, and continued at this until 1875, when the firm of Lambeth Bros. bought the boat "Tidal Waves," and ran on the river from Evansville, Ind., to Memphis, Tenn., and in 1878 they added the mercantile business to their mill business at Weston, Crittenden Co., Ky.   Our subject remained in the store until 1879, when the firm bought the boat "Jennie Julia," and he went to steamboating, continuing also the other business until 1880.  He was also interested in the lumber and commission business at St. Louis, Mo.  In 1884 he closed out his business at the above mentioned place and took charge of a government boat about six months, and in the meantime had his present house built, and opened a general store at Golddust, in May, 1884.  August 12, 1868, he was married to Mattie E. Graham, daughter of Joseph and Mary J. Graham, of Harrisburg, Ill.   No children have been born to this marriage.  Mr. Lambeth has led an active life, and has remarkable energy; he has accumulated a nice property by his own efforts and business tact, and is highly respected by those who know him.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Capt. M. M. Lindsley, the leading merchant of Fulton, Tenn., was born December 11, 1833, in Limestone County, Ala., and is a son of Col. William and Anna M. (Motle) Lindsley.  His father was born in 1798, and was a colonel in the United Army, and a native of Norfolk, Va.  He was an officer in the United States Army for a number of years, and died in the service in 1838.  His mother was a near relative of the Motles, who made themselves famous during the Revolutionary war, in South Carolina.  Our subject was only five years old when his father died; he then went to live with an uncle in Boston, Mass., but in two years went to an aunt in Mississippi, and remained with her until twenty years of age; he then went to Nicaragua and joined Gen. Walker's army, and spent a year in the service, and then returned to the United States, and engaged in civil engineering in Alabama, until the war, when he entered the Confederate service in Company A, Nineteenth Mississippi Infantry, as second lieutenant.  In the spring of 1862 he made aide-de-camp, and served in this capacity on Gen. C. M. Wilcox's staff until the surrender, when he returned to Mississippi and engaged in cotton planting in Noxubee County.  In 1868 he moved to Fulton, Tenn., and took an interest in the firm of A. C. Lea & Co., and since the death of Albert Lea, the senior partner, has taken his place, assuming control of the general business, and holding a controlling interest in the firm.  Mr. Lindsley was married October 12, 1865, to Frances Johnson, a daughter of Michael Johnson.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


Richard F. Lipscomb was born in De Soto County, Miss., March 24, 1856, and is the oldest of four sons born to John T. and Caroline W. (Nowell) Lipscomb, and is of Scotch descent.  Our subject's mother was a daughter of Prof. F. H. Nowell, who was president of the Semple Broadus College, at Center Hill, Miss., where he died in 1860.  He was a native of Virginia.  The father was also a Virginian, and when a boy moved with his parents to Huntsville, Ala., and the first year of the war they moved to De Soto County, Miss.  He enlisted in the Confederate Army, and was an officer in Forrest's command, and was in the battle of Fort Pillow.  He served until the close of the war, and is now living near Huntsville, Ala.  Our subject's mother was a Virginian, and died near Huntsville in 1869.   Richard F. was raised and educated on a farm, and engaged in farming until 1880, when he began merchandising at Henning, Tenn., in the firm of Lipscomb & Bro., but in May, 1886, the store and contents was destroyed by fire, and he has since been engaged in the livery business, in connection with farming, owning 100 acres of land six miles south of Ripley, Tenn., on the Newport News & Mississippi Valley Railroad, giving special attention to stock raising.  Mr. Lipscomb is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Gen. Hancock.  He was married in Madison County, Ala., November 30, 1881, to Miss Dora M. Harris, daughter of T. B. Harris, an extensive planter before the war.  During the war Mr. Harris was shot in battle through the lungs, and died from the effects of it.  Mrs. Lipscomb was born in Marshall County, Ala., in 1861.   They have three children -- Richard F., Mary H. and Rose.  Mrs. Lipscomb is greatly esteemed in the community in which he lives.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page


W. A. Lloyd, resident and farmer of the Tenth District of Lauderdale County, was born in Orange County, N. C., December 17, 1840, and is a son of Sydney S. and Susan M. (Barbee) Lloyd.  The father was born in North Carolina, January 19, 1807, and located in Haywood County, Tenn., in 1844, but in a short time moved to Lauderdale County, locating near Henning Station, where he remained until 1855, when he moved to the farm where our subject now lives.  He settled the farm and built a log house on it, which is still standing.  He died December 6, 1879.   The mother was  born September 3, 1814, in Orange County, N. C., and died in 1867.  W. A. Lloyd was raised on a farm, and worked for his father until the war, when he entered the Confederate service in Company G., Fourth Tennessee Infantry, and was badly wounded at the battle of Shiloh, in April, 1862, just above the right ankle, shattering the bone and disabling him from further service, so he returned home and resumed his farming.  In 1866 he commenced merchandising at Oak Grove, and continued until 1868, but since then has given all of his time to farming.  December 13, 1866, he married Margaret (Selina) Hanna, daughter of John Hamilton and Martha Hanna.  Nine children were born to them: Sidney Merritt, Rosa Viola, Mason Allen, Lizzie Ozella, Fred Aulston, Lina Etta, Mattie Ella, Tommie Hanna, who died August 14, 1885, and Nora Ida.   Mr. Lloyd is regarded as one of the most substantial citizens of the county, and is a self-made man, as his educational advantages were limited.  He is a Democrat, and a man of strict integrity.

Return to biographies index | Return to main page

Back to Goodspeed Index

Back to Lauderdale County TNGenWeb Main Page

2001 by Lauderdale County Coordinator