Goodspeed's Biographies of
Lauderdale Co., TN

James C. Alsobrook, one of the substantial farmers residing near Double Bridges, Lauderdale County, was born in Edgecombe County, NC., March 9, 1828, and was a son of Micajah and Chloe (Simmons) Alsobrook.  They came to Tennessee in 1836, their family consisting of two sons and three daughters; both parents were natives of North Carolina.   They settled at Trenton, Gibson County, Tenn., for four years; then purchased a farm eight miles west of Trenton and lived there twelve years, when they moved to Hardeman County, an in 1848 to Lauderdale County and settled near Double Bridges, where the father died in 1856.  The mother died on Knob Creek in 1879.  James C. Alsobrook was reared on a farm, and educated at Trenton, Tenn., making farming his business.   September 12, 1848, he was married in Lauderdale County, to Miss Mary E. Sumerow, daughter of Henry sumerow, a farmer.  Two sons and four daughters were born to them--two now living, Allie Dora (Love) and Robert S.  Mrs. Alsobrook was born in Rutherford County, July 13, 1824, and with her husband and children belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Mr. Alsobrook is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for Cass.  He owns a farm of 400 acres with a handsome residence on it, and raises grain, stock and cotton; gives his chief attention to the latter.  The farm is on the Ripley and Dyersburg road thirteen miles north of Ripley and is one of the most pleasant homes in the county.  Mr. Alsobrook's father was a soldier in the war of 1812.  Mr. Alsobrook takes a deep interest in the progress of his county and is a most valuable citizen.

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Simmons D. Alsobrook (deceased) was born in Edgecombe County, N.C., June 17, 1830, and was the youngest of two sons and three daughters born to Micajah and Chloe (Simmons) Alsobrook.  His father was born in North Carolina and came to Tennessee in 1836, settling for a short time in Hardeman County, then moved to Lauderdale County, where he remained until his death August 29, 1856.  Our subject was raised and educated in the county and made farming his chief occupation.  Mr. Alsobrook served eight months in the Confederate Army.  He was married in Lauderdale County, February 2, 1859, to Miss Susan C. Soward.  Five sons and two daughters were born to this marriage:  James L., Robert L., William M., Marian Estelle, Alner L., Vivian C. and Roie S.  Mrs Alsobrook was born in Lauderdale County, April 6, 1839.  Mr. Alsobrook stands well in his county, and after serving as deputy sheriff for two years was elected sheriff, and on the first day of  November, after the election, he was shot and killed on the streets while in the discharge of his official duties.  This tragedy was a shock to the community in which he lived, and to his bereaved family, and created a strong desire in the minds of the citizens to see justice administered to the assassin commensurate with the crime, and before day the murderer was hung and riddled with bullets.  Rev. Joseph H. Borum, in writing on the subject of his death, said: "As a husband, he had few if any superiors; as a father, tender and loving; as a church member, faithful -- these, altogether, made him a worthy citizen."

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Dr. John J. Alston, a retired physician and prominent farmer of Lauderdale County, was born in Williamson County, August 1, 1831, and is the son of Hardaway Alston, who was born in Warren County, N.C., in 1800, and came with his parents to Williamson, January 8, 1813, and after attaining his majority he married Rebecca P. Bradley, a daughter of Capt. Joseph J. Bradley, a farmer and one of the pioneers of Middle Tennessee.  After his marriage they settled in Williamson County, Tenn., and settled at Mason's Grove, remaining until 1857, when he removed to Lauderdale County and settled near the Hatchie River, and died at his son's (V.S. Alston), in 1876.  The mother was born in Warren County, N.C., and died at the home on Hatchie River in 1858.  Dr. John Alston was raised on the farm, and received a liberal education at Triune, Tenn., then read medicine with Dr.  W. L. Fox, at Mason's Grove, and attended lectures at the Memphis Medical College in 1852-53, and was a most successful physician for eighteen years, when he retired in favor of a cousin.  Dr. Alston was married in Lauderdale County, May 4, 1859, to Miss Mary F. Loyd, daughter of Sydney S. Loyd, a farmer.  Mrs. Alston was born in North Carolina, in 1837.  No children have been born to this marriage, but they have an adopted daughter, Lee Anna Alston, fifteen years of age.  Dr. Alston is a democrat, and was made a Mason in Fuller Lodge, No. 269, at Ripley, Tenn., in 1857, representing his lodge in the Grand Lodge at Nashville for many years.  In 1858-59 he was coroner in the county.  In 1878 he represented his county in the Legislature.  With his wife he belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church.  Dr. Alston owns a farm of 767 acres of good land, eleven miles south of Ripley, on the Fulton road.  It has a handsome residence on it and is one of the most desirable homes in the county, but they are at present living at Henning, where they have another pleasant home, and are prominent people socially and in the church.

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Theophilus Anderson, a merchant of Curve, was born in Madison County, Tenn., November 13, 1840, and was the third member of a family of three sons and seven daughters born to J. B. and Martha W. (Sherman) Anderson, and is of English descent.  His father was born in South Carolina in 1805, and came with his parents to Bedford County, Tenn., when a small boy, where he was raised and educated.  In 1830 he moved to Madison County, where he married; in 1851 he moved to Lauderdale County, and settled near Tisdale Springs, and served as magistrate in his district for several years, dying in Haywood County, July 17, 1875.  Our subject's mother was born in North Carolina, and still lives in Haywood County.  Theophilus Anderson followed farming until 1880; since then has been in the saw-mill and mercantile business.  He enlisted in the Confederate Army, and belonged to the Sixth Tennessee Infantry, under Col. Wm. A. Stephens, of Jackson, Tenn., and was in the battles of Perryville and Chickamauga, and in the retreat from Dalton to Atlanta; was two years and six months in the quartermaster's department, and in the army four years.  Mr. Anderson was married in Haywood County, January 1, 1867, to Elizabeth J. Garrett, daughter of Henderson Garrett; one son, Floyd A., was born to this marriage.  Mrs. Anderson was born in Madison County, in 1842, and died in Lauderdale County, in 1870.  December 21, 1871, our subject was again married in Haywood County, to Mary E. Garrett, who was born in the same county, in February, 1844.  Three sons and one daughter were born to this union: Eustace, John P., Ivan and Florence E.  In politics Mrs. Anderson is a Democrat, he is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and was W. M. of his lodge, and, with his wife, belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.   He is a member of the firm of Irvin & Anderson, at Curve, Tenn., and is an influential citizen of that place.

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Dr. T. A. Anthony, Sr., a physician of Durhamville, Lauderdale County, Tenn., is a son of James C. and Mary S. (Lee) Anthony.  His father was born in Campbell County, Va., in 1786, and his mother in Westmoreland County, Va., in 1791, and they were married in 1810.  Four sons were born to them: Phillip L., born in 1811; William A., born in 1813; James G., born in 1815; and our subject.  In 1832 they moved to Arkansas and lived there until the father died in 1866, and the mother died in Arkansas in the same year.  They did not belong to any church; he was an old line Whig.  Our subject is of Italian descent on his father's side, one of his ancestors being a merchant of Genoa, Italy, and, while trading on the Mediterranean Sea, was captured by pirates and taken to Algeria and sold as a slave, but was afterward liberated by an Englishman and went to England. On the mother's side, Dr. Anthony's ancestors were English, tracing back to William the Conqueror.  Hugh Lee, one of his ancestors, was made Earl of Litchfield by William the Conqueror, for services rendered at the battle of Hastings; some of his ancestors fled to Virginia, when Cromwell ruled in England, and after the coronation of Charles II, returned to England to ask the King to restore their estates; but the King, on account of Parliament, gave them large tracts of land in Virginia and they returned to that State, and from them came the famous Lee family of Virginia.   Our subject was born in Richmond, Va., April 1, 1817.  His opportunities for educationg himself while young were neglected, as his parents were moving from place to place.  At the age of eighteen he commenced studying at home and, in 1840, commenced the study of medicine, graduating at Jefferson Medical College in 1843.  June 23, 1853 he married Miss Sarah M. Rice, a native of Georgetown District, S.C., born in 1836, and they have five children: Thomas A., Jr., Eugene R., Charles McHenry, Albert Sydney, and Mary L., all living.  Dr. Anthony came to Lauderdale County, April 4, 1843, and engaged in the practice of medicine, which he still successfully continues.  With his wife he belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church.  Dr. Anthony has divided his land among his children.  He has been a resident of Lauderdale County for forty-three years and is a most agreeable, pleasant gentleman.

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E. R. Anthony, son of Dr. Thomas Anthony and Susan M. Anthony, was born in Durhamville, Lauderdale County, May 29, 1856.  He received a common-school education and worked on the farm until eighteen years old.  November 13, 1885 he married Miss Admonia Jones, who was born in Lauderdale County, February 4, 1869.  One son, Eugene Thomas, was born to them August 13, 1886.  Neither Mr. Anthony nor his wife are church members.   Mr. Anthony has been in the mercantile business since 1880,  also owning a drug store at Durhamville.  He has been quite successful for a young man, doing the largest business of his town.  He is a Democrat, but takes no active interest or part in politics.  Mr. Anthony is well known and has the esteem of all.

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Leamon B. Archer, a resident of Halls Station, Tenn., was born near Garland, in Tipton County, August 24, 1859, and was the second of five sons born to Charles W. and Susan E. (Walker) Archer, and is of French-German descent. His father was born in Fayette County, but his parents moved to Tipton County when he was an infant. He was raised, educated and married, and died in that county on February 18, 1878. The mother was born in Tipton County, Tenn., November 1, 1836, and now resides in Covington. Our subject was raised and educated on a farm, and farmed two years for himself, and at twenty-two years of age commenced clerking for Armestead Bros., at Fulton, Tenn., going from this place to Elmot, Ark., clerking for John Oglesby & Co., but was compelled to give up the position on account of ill health and became a member of the firm of Archer, Walk & Co., of Garland, Tenn., but a year later commenced merchandising for himself at Halls Station, which he continued from June, 1884, to April, 1886, when he sold out to T. E. Salisbury; he is now the proprietor of a livery stable, and is railroad agent at Hall's Station. Mr. Archer is a Democrat, and cast his vote for Gen. Hancock. He is a member of the National Railroad Agents Association, and one of the popular, enterprising business men of the place.

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John Y. Barbee, one of the leading and most enterprising merchants of Ripley, is a son of Allen and Susan Y. (Taylor) Barbee. His father was born in 1803, in Orange County, N.C., and his mother in 1815 in Mecklenburg County, Va. They had nine children -- two boys and seven girls -- all of whom lived to be grown; both parents were Methodists. The father, an eminent physician, graduated at the Philadelphia Medical College, after completing his literary education at Chapel Hill University, North Carolina. In 1827 he move to Haywood County, Tenn., locating in Brownsville, and was the first physician to use quinine in that county. His first professional call was a case of chills, which he cured and laid the foundation for his later success. Mrs. Barbee's family moved near Brownsville in 1824, and they were married in 1832. Dr. Barbee was a Democrat all of his life. In connection with his professional duties, he farmed extensively. His wife died in 1868, and he died in 1878. Our subject was born August 20, 1840, in Haywood County, was raised on a farm and educated by private teachers. When sixteen, he went to Memphis as a clerk in a dry goods store, where he remained three years. In 1861 he volunteered in the Confederate service, in Company D, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, and was in active service until close of the war. After the war he farmed a year, then moved to Ripley and engaged in the mercantile business. In 1864 he married P. M. Read, who was born February 25, 1843, and they have been blessed with ten children, four sons and four daughters living; both parents and four of the children are Methodists. For nineteen years he has been one of the most successful merchants of Ripley.

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John D. Baxter, register of Lauderdale County, is the son of David and Cynthia (Dixon) Baxter. The father was a native of North Carolina, and, when a young man, came to Middle Tennessee, where he married Miss Dixon and by her had two sons and a daughter; they settled in Middle Tennessee, where the mother died in 1831, a devout member of the Presbyterian Church. The following year he married Frances Elder, by whom he had six children; he was not a member of any church; she belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South; he was a farmer, a quiet, upright man, in politics as Democrat; he died in 1857, about sixty-seven years old. John D. Baxter, our subject, inherits Irish blood through his father; he was born September 14, 1823, in Rutherford County; received a common school education, and remained on the farm until he was twenty-one years old; then served a three years' apprenticeship learning the carpenter's trade, which he followed for seventeen years. In 1848, Mr. Baxter married Ann A. Lackey, who was born May 26, 1829, in Rutherford County; two of the six children born to them are living now. In 1861 they moved to Lauderdale County, which has since been their home, the entire family belongs to the Presbyterian Church. In 1865 Mr. Baxter was appointed by Gov. Brownlow to fill the office of register of Lauderdale County, and in 1866 he was elected by the people to fill the office, and has been so popular and efficient as an officer that he has been re-elected every four years since then and is still holding it for the sixth term. For twelve years he was postmaster at Ripley, Tenn. Politically he is a Democrat. In 1871, Mrs. Baxter died, and he has never remarried. He has been a resident of Lauderdale County for twenty-five years, and is a worthy citizen.

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Kenneth H. Bentley (deceased), was one of the prominent farmers of the Second District, and was born in Bertie County, N.C., April 9, 1833. When he was eleven years old his parents moved to West Tennessee, and settled in Haywood County, but moved to Lauderdale County a few years later and settled in a short time on their present homestead, where K. H. Bentley, Sr., died March 24, 1866, and the mother died October 5, 1886. Our subject was the second child of three sons and four daughters. He had the advantages of a good common-school education and made farming his chief occupation, and was before the war an old-line Whig, but a stanch Republican afterward, and with his wife belonged to the Baptist Church. Mr. Bentley was married in Crockett County, February 27, 1861, to Miss Palona J. Ferguson, daughter of Douglas Ferguson; they had eleven children, nine of them living: Joseph H., Walter E., Austin A., David E., Jonathan A., Bertie, Altie, Kenneth O., Lucy A., and Laura E. Mrs. Bentley, the mother of this family, was born in Dyer County, Tenn., February 20, 1844. In 1861 the family moved to Crockett County, and in two years to Missouri and settled in New Madrid County, then returned to Crockett County, and two years later to their present home, where Mr. Bentley died May 17, 1886. The farm consists of 150 acres of fine productive land, managed by the sons of Mrs. Bentley, Austin A. having chief control. It is pleasantly located ten miles north of Ripley on the Key Corner and Ripley road, and is well improved.

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Stephen H. Bibb, a prominent farmer residing in the northern part of Lauderdale County, was born in Rockingham County, N.C., July 30, 1833, and was the tenth child of eleven children, nine of whom lived to be grown, born to Richard C. and Margary (Hooper) Bibb. Both parents were born in North Carolina, and came to Tipton County, Tenn., in 1840. The father was a carpenter, but gave his time to farming; he died on Knob Creek in Lauderdale county, in 1861, and the mother died at the homestead on Knob Creek, in 1862. Our subject was raised and educated on a farm, and has made farming his business. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate Army, with Gen. Chalmer's brigade of cavalry, but after serving eighteen months was discharged on account of ill-health. January 31, 1856, he was married in this county to Miss Martha E. Forbest, and to this union were born Mary A., September 7, 1857; William R., born May 12, 1861, and Stephen R., born October 15, 1862. The latter married Miss Martha C. Childress, daughter of J. F. Childress, and to them were born four children at two births. Mrs. Bibb was born near Bloomfield, Ill., and died December 26, 1865, and our subject was married the second time in Lauderdale County, February 10, 1867, to Mrs. Nancy W. Edney. She had one son by her former marriage -- John G. Edney, born June 8, 1862. Mrs. Bibb was a native of this county, born June 16, 1842, a daughter of Squire Thomas J. Childress, a very prominent farmer of his locality. Our subject is a Democrat, casting his first presidential vote for James Buchanan; he is a Mason, and with his wife belongs to the Methodist Church South. Mr. Bibb has a good farm ten miles north of Ripley. He is a quiet, industrious farmer, holding the respect of the community in which he lives.

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Richard A. Blackwell, a prominent citizen of Lauderdale County, was born in South Carolina, May 6, 1833. His father, Thomas Blackwell, was a native of North Carolina, and came to Tennessee in 1837, settling in Hardin County on the east side of the Tennessee River, where he engaged in farming, and had a saw and grist-mill. He was married twice in South Carolina. Our subject was the fourth child born to the last marriage. After living four years in Hardin County he moved to Haywood, and two years later to Lauderdale County, where he died in February 1867. Our subject's mother died September 1876. Richard Blackwell was raised on the farm, and engaged in farming and saw-milling. In 1858 he went to South Carolina on a visit and remained until 1861, when he enlisted in South Carolina Cavalry (Confederate Army), and served through the war. He was at the siege of Port Royal, and in the battles of Grahamville, Waterboro and other places; his command was disbanded at Greensboro, N.C., January 7, 1863. He was married to Miss L. C. Buche, a daughter of A. A. Buche, a prominent rice planter. To this marriage were born Alonzo P., at Mathews Bluff, while on the retreat, before Sherman's army, December 26, 1864; Thomas A., May 27, 1866; Edgar M., November 15, 1867; Mary E., in Georgia, December 15, 1868, and Allie May, in West Tennessee, December 31, 1879. Mrs. Blackwell was born in Buford District, S.C., April 8, 1841. After the war he moved to Georgia, and remained four years; then settled in Haywood County, Tenn., and in 1874 moved to Lauderdale and located at his present homestead. In 1882 he erected a sawmill at a cost of $4,000, and in October 1884, it was destroyed by fire, but in less than three months he had built another mill, costing $5,000, with a capacity of 20,000 feet a day. Mr. Blackwell owns 242 acres of land with a handsome new residence on it. He is a Democrat and a Mason and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mrs. Blackwell is a Missionary Baptist. He is one of the substantial, influential men of this county.

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William A. Blair, a prosperous merchant of Hall's Station, Lauderdale Co., Tenn., was born two miles southeast of Friendship, Crockett Co., Tenn., February 8, 1858, and is the oldest of seven children born to G.W. & M.J. Davis; three sons and one daughter are living. Our subject is of Irish descent. His father was born in North Carolina, and came with his parents to Tennessee when eight years old, and lived in Carroll County, where he was raised and educated, and after reaching his majority he went to what is now Crockett County, where he married and raised his family, and is still living. His wife died in Gibson County in 1869. William A. Blair was raised on a farm and received a good education; he has made merchandising his business. He served a year at first with Tucker & Hamlet, as clerk in their grocery store; then clerked in the general merchandise store for three years and a half for J.B. Tucker. For three years he has been in business for himself, with a large stock of drugs and groceries. He was married in Haywood County, December 4, 1884, to Miss Ada G. Wortham, a daughter of Rush Wortham, a farmer. She was born in Shelby County, twelve miles from Memphis. Mr. Blair is a Democrat, and a member of the Christian Church, while Mrs. Blair belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His business prospects are good, and he is regarded by all as an accurate business man and a worthy citizen.

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Thomas G. Bomer, farmer and merchant, was born in Williamson County, Tenn., May 7, 1828. His father, William Bomer, was born in Halifax County, Va., and immigrated to Williamson County, Tenn., when a young man, and married Miss Margaret B. Ricketts, a daughter of Thomas Ricketts, a farmer formerly of North Carolina. Their family consisted of three sons and four daughters, our subject being the oldest child. The father moved with his family to Calloway County, Ky., in 1858, and two years later moved to Weakley County, Tenn., where he remained until he died, in 1878, and one day later his wife died and they were both buried in the same grave. Our subject was raised and educated on a farm, and has made farming his business. He remained at his father's until twenty-three years of age, then married in Williamson County, Tenn., December 23, 1851, Miss Mary Powell, a daughter of Squire Powell. Four sons and three daughters were born to this union: William P., Edward J., John O'Neil, Otie G., Minerva A., (Tilman) Mollie L. and Annie. Two have died, William P., November 11, 1878, and Minerva A. Tilman died near San Antonio, Tex., September 28, 1876. Mrs. Bomer was born in Adair County, Ky., April 13, 1832. Mr. Bomer is a Democrat and a Mason, and his wife and children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Bomer is a man of kind heart and a high sense of honor; he is well liked in his community. He owns a good farm with a comfortable residence on it, thirteen miles north of Ripley on the Ripley and Key Corner road.

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C. E. Bowers, a merchant of Henning, Tenn., is the son of James and Dicy M. (Moore) Bowers. The father was born in Virginia, May 10, 1804, the mother in Newbern District, S.C., June 7, 1811. They came to Tennessee while young, and were married February 22, 1837. To this union were born four sons and four daughters; six are now living. The father was a Missionary Baptist and a Democrat; he died May 24, 1869. His mother was a member of the Christian Church, and died February 27, 1879. Our subject was of Scotch-Irish descent on the mother's side and German on the father's side, and was born at Brownsville, Tenn., May 3, 1840. He had good educational advantages. When the war broke out, he volunteered in the ninth Mississippi Regiment Infantry Volunteers, Confederate Army, it being the first regiment to leave the State, and he was in numerous battles, remaining until the surrender. After the war he returned to Panola County, Miss., where he was married January 18, 1870, to Miss Ann E. Cathey, who was born February 5, 1844, in Mecklenburg County, N.C. Two sons and four daughters were born to this marriage; one son, Charles E. and three daughters, Emma M., Jessie J. and Evalina are living. Mr. And Mrs. Bowers moved to Lauderdale County in 1876, and the following year moved to Henning, Tenn., where he engaged in the drug business; he is now a salesman in the store of Wilson & Bowers. In politics he is a straight-out Prohibitionist. He was postmaster during the yellow-fever epidemic in 1878 to 1880, and is a Mason and a Knight of Honor. Both his wife and himself belonged to the Christian Church. Mrs. Bowers died October 24, 1883. Mr. Bowers is a man of integrity and kind heart.

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G. M. D. Bowers, a leading merchant of Henning, Lauderdale County, Tenn.; is a son of James and Dicy M. Bowers, and was born in Brownsville, Tenn., March 19, 1844. Mr. Bowers had good educational advantages and has a good common-school education. In 1862 he enlisted as a volunteer in Ward's Battery of Panola County, Miss., which was consolidated with Gates' Battery after the battle of Vicksburg, and he was in several engagements without being wounded, and remained in the service until the surrender. March 1874, he located in Henning, Tenn., and commenced merchandising, erecting the first business house in the place under the firm name of Wilson & Bowers, and ever since has been in the business, carrying a complete stock of general merchandising, erecting the first business, carrying a complete stock of general merchandise. January 20, 1868, he was married to Miss Mary E. Bowers, who was born in Lauderdale County, Tenn., June 13, 1847, one son was born to them, Robert C., November 18, 1868; he died June 13, 1874. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and died November 25, 1870. November 3, 1875, Mr. Bowers married Miss F.E.A. Greaves, who was born in Haywood County, Tenn., December 25, 1854, and two sons and a daughter were born to this marriage: Joseph B., born October 5, 1876, E-----, born September 29, 1879, and Robert C., born December 12, 1882; all of them are living. Mr. And Mrs. Bowers are members of the Christian Church, and in politics he is a straightforward Prohibitionist. As a merchant he has been very successful, and at present is carrying such a large stock that he employs a force of seven men to conduct the business. Mr. Bowers has been a resident of the county for sixteen years and is well liked by all who know him. He is an accurate business man, and is a Mason and a Knight of Honor.

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D. A. Boyd, a farmer of Lauderdale County, is a son of George and Mary (Halley) Boyd. His father was born in Halifax County, Va., in 1800, and his mother in Mecklenburg County, Va., in 1801; they were married about 1825, and seven sons and two daughters were born to them. Mr. Boyd, Sr., was in the war of 1812, was not connected with any church, in politics was an old line Whig, and died in 1855. Mrs. Boyd was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church; she died in 1870. Our subject was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in Halifax County, Va., in February, 1830, was raised on a farm, and received a good education. March, 1850, he married Miss Mary Gravatt, who was born in Halifax County, Va., in 1835. Nine of the twelve children born to this marriage are living. In 1857, he moved to Haywood County, Tenn., and in 1862 to Lauderdale County, where he has since engaged in farming. Mrs. Boyd is a Primitive Baptist; he is a member of the Methodist Church South. Before the war Mr. Boyd was a Whig, and has since been a Republican. In 1881, he represented Lauderdale County in the Legislature, serving two years. He owns 275 acres of good land, and also runs a cotton-gin. As a farmer he has been quite successful, and is considered one of the substantial and enterprising citizens of his district. He is a member of the Masonic lodge.

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William Boydstun, an enterprising farmer of Lauderdale County, was born in Campbell County, December 1, 1816. His father, Thomas Boydstun, was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee before the organization of the State, settling in the eastern part. He was married in North Carolina to Elizabeth Newport, daughter of Rev. Richard Newport, a farmer and native of Virginia. Five sons and six daughters were born to this marriage, our subject being the tenth child. He is of English-Irish descent. His mother was born in Virginia, and died in Lauderdale County, March 6, 1862; his father was a Democrat and a farmer, and died March 21, 1835. Our subject was raised on a farm, and received only a limited education in the country schools, but by persistent application has since acquired a great deal of general information. Mr. Boydstun was married in this county, August 29, 1838, to Mary Lusk, a daughter of James Lusk, a farmer and school teacher. Two sons and three daughters were born to this marriage; only one is now living, Martha P. (Moore). The mother of this family was born in Williamson County, January 11, 1839. Our subject is a State's rights Democrat, and used his influence to aid in the Confederacy. He enlisted in H.C. King's battalion (infantry), afterward in the First Regiment of Cavalry, as first lieutenant, and was in the battle of Paris, Tenn., and after a service of one year, resigned on account of ill health. The Boydstun family was represented in the Confederate Army by ten members in active service. Our subject has a farm of 312 acres, four miles north of Ripley, and is an enterprising, progressive farmer.

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Benjamin F. Boydstun, a farmer in the northern part of Lauderdale County, was born in Campbell County, Tenn., and is a son of Thomas Boydstun. Our subject was raised on a farm, and received a limited education in the subscription schools of the county, and has always been a farmer. He married in this county, August 30, 1843, Mary Wood, daughter of Armstead Wood, a farmer, and to them were born three sons and one daughter. The latter died in infancy, and the sons were named James K. Polk, Armstead Wood and Thomas Jefferson. The mother of this family was born in Alabama in 1823, and died June 6, 1875, and our subject was again married in the home where he now lives, December 28, 1882, to Mrs. Martha F. Ledbetter, daughter of Jasper Meadow, a merchant and farmer. She was born in Williamson County September 25, 1842, and by this marriage one daughter was born, who died in infancy. Our subject was in the Confederate Army in the First Regiment of Cavalry, under Col. H. C. King, and was in the battles of Perryville, Ky., Murfreesboro, and served seventeen months. He had three sons in active service; one served through the entire war, one a less period, and one was wounded near Pulaski, Tenn., from the effects of which he died October 15, 1864. Mr. Boydstun is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for James K. Polk. Mr. and Mrs. Boydstun belong to the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a kind, generous man, of strict integrity, and owns 140 acres of land five miles north of Ripley.

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Richard C. Bradford, a resident and farmer of Lauderdale County, Tenn., was born in Carroll Parish, La., October 15, 1861. His grandfather, John Bradford, was born in England about 1780, and came to the United States about 1807, married in Virginia, and in 1820 moved to Illinois, and soon after moved to what is now Lauderdale County, where he raised his family and died in 1873. Our subject's father, John S. Bradford, was born near Durhamville, Lauderdale County, September, 1831. When twenty-two, he went to Louisiana, where he was an overseer until 1855, when he returned to Tennessee and married Miss V. A. Browning, a sister of Hon. R. H. Browning, and daughter of Leven Browning, a merchant and farmer. After this they moved to Louisiana, and remained until the war, when he enlisted in the Confederate Army. After the war he moved to Mississippi, but two years later he returned to Lauderdale County, and died January 7, 1877. The mother was born in Nashville, and died while on a visit to Calhoun County, Miss., June 22, 1878. Our subject was raised on the farm, and, after attending the schools in the county, spent four years at McKenzie College and a year and a half at the Vanderbilt University at Nashville. Mr. Bradford was married in Lauderdale County, February 14, 1884, to Miss Addie Tillman, a daughter of W. T. Tillman. One daughter, Erin, was born to them July 25, 1885. The mother was born in Lauderdale County June 13, 1863. Mr. Bradford is a Democrat, but liberal in his political views, and his wife and himself belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a frank, generous disposition, and possesses fine business capacity. Mr. Bradford has 900 acres of land twelve miles north of Ripley, in a fertile, undulating locality. The dwelling is handsome, and a delightful home.

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Williamson R. Bradford, citizen and farmer of the northern part of Lauderdale County, was born September 21, 1836, in the same county. His father was a native of North Carolina, who came to Tennessee, and settled in the southern part of Lauderdale County. He was married in North Carolina, to Elizabeth Carrigan, a native of that State and a daughter of John Carrigan, who was a native of Ireland. In 1826 the family came to Tennessee and located near Durhamville, where the children, eight in number, were raised and educated. The father was a farmer and moved to the Seventh District in 1861, where he died December 1, 1869, and the mother died at the home of our subject in April, 1872. W. R. Bradford was raised on a farm; he enlisted in the Confederate Army and belonged to the First Regiment of Cavalry, under Col. Cox, and participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge, Jonesboro, Ga., and Perryville, Ky. He enlisted in January 1862, and served until he was surrendered with Wheeler's command at Gainesville, Ala. Mr. Bradford was married in Lauderdale County, December 17, 1866, to Lavina Powell, a daughter of Elias Powell, a farmer of Middle Tennessee. Four children were born to them; two living: Ophelia A. and Emmet B. Mrs. Bradford was born in Williamson County, November 28, 1842. Mr. Bradford was an old line Whig, but is now a Democrat. He owns a farm of 200 acres, and is regarded as one of the substantial men of the county, being upright in all of his dealings, and generous in disposition.

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Hon. Richard H. Browning, a prominent planter of the northern part of Lauderdale County, was born in Williamson County, Tenn., about midway between Franklin and Nashville, December 16, 1835. His father, L. Browning, was born in Edinboro, Scotland, in 1800, and emigrated to America when eighteen years old. After remaining a short time at Philadelphia, he came to Nashville, where he sold goods until 1835. He married Lucinda Hightower, daughter of Richard Hightower, one of the respected and well-known farmers of that section. Two sons and two daughters were born to them, our subject being the youngest child. The mother was born in Williamson County, and died in Hardeman County in 1836. The father was a man of extensive reading and broad ideas; he was fully informed upon all political subjects, and might have commanded the popular support in politics, but preferred the quiet life. In 1835 he moved to Hardeman County, settling in the northwestern portion of the county, and farmed until his death in October 1857. Our subject was raised on a farm, and completed his education at Bethel College. He married in Lauderdale County, March 20, 1861, Miss Margaret J. Wright, a daughter of Edward Wright, a native of Virginia, and a well-known farmer of Lauderdale. To this marriage were born Stella V., Mary L., Edward Marvin, and Cordy Ethel. Mrs. Browning was born in Lauderdale County, August 1838. Mr. Browning is a Democrat and cast his first vote for Jno. C. Breckinridge, and gave his vote and influence in favor of secession, believing it best and believing that the State under the Constitution of the United States, had a right to this prerogative. He enlisted in the Confederate Army, and was mustered into cavalry service September 21, 1861, at Columbus, Ky., and belonged to Capt. R. W. Haywood's company, which was afterward Company D, Seventh Tennessee Regiment, under Col. Jackson. He served under Gens. Chalmers and Forrest, and was in all the battles his company fought in, and was surrendered by Forrest, May 8, 1865, at Gainesville, Ala. Mr. Browning represented his county in the Forty-fourth General Assembly of the State, and proved a useful, efficient representative. Mr. and Mrs. Browning are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He owns 600 acres of land; 300 under cultivation.. He raises stock, but gives his chief attention to cotton, and is one of the practical, influential citizens of the county.

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Charles Edward Butler, merchant and citizen of Fulton, holding an interest in the firm of A. C. Lea & Co., was born in Hallowell, Me., October 16, 1826, and is a son of Elijah and Lou (Kersey) Butler. His father was born in Maine, and died in 1846, and his mother was also a native of that State, but died in Aberdeen, Miss., about 1864. Our subject is of English-Scotch descent. Until twenty-four years of age, he was in the school-room all of the time, graduating at Bowdoin College. In 1851 he came South and commenced teaching at Trenton, Tenn., and continued there until 1859, when he moved to Crawfordville, Miss., and taught one year, and then taught at Carrollton, Ala., until the war, when he enlisted in the Confederate service, in what was known as Picken's Grays, but in a short time was transferred to Gen. Tilghman's staff as an aide-de-camp, staying with him until his death, when he was transferred to Gen. Lorring's staff, where he remained until just before the surrender, when he was discharged by petition in order to return to his school, which his wife had attended during his absence. He resumed his duties as teacher there until 1865, when he moved to Gainesville, Ala., and took charge of the female institute there until 1867, when he moved to Fulton, Tenn., and became a member of the firm of A. C. Lea & Co., and is now the senior partner of the firm. August, 1852, he was married to Mary L. Lea, a daughter of Dr. W. W. Lea. The have had seven children -- five boys and two girls -- Charles E., Mattie L., who died December 24, 1882; William W., Albert L., Joel L., Edward I., and Myra L. Mr. Butler is a Democrat, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. He has been very successful in business and has accumulated his property by his own efforts. He is a man of fine social standing, is highly cultured and is scrupulously honest in every transaction.

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W. P. H. Butler, an influential farmer and merchant, residing at Flippin's, Lauderdale County, was born in Oglethorpe County, Ga., August 18, 1849. His father, B. Butler, was a native of Georgia, born January 6, 1828, and moved to this State in 1866, locating in Fulton, on the Mississippi River. He was married before leaving Georgia to Miss Sarah Landrum, sister of Rev. Dr. Landrum, of New Orleans, well known for brave service during the yellow fever scourge in Memphis, and a daughter of William Landrum, a prominent planter. This marriage was blessed with five sons and three daughters, our subject being the eldest born. The father began merchandising at Fort Pillow in 1878, where he died, December 1882. The mother was born in Oglethorpe County, Ga., May 9, 1826, and is now living at Flippin's, Tenn. Our subject was raised at Lincolnton, Ga., received a common school education, and has made farming and merchandising his business. When only fifteen years of age he enlisted in the Confederate Army, and belonged to the First Georgia Regiment, under Col. Willis. He participated in the retreat from Dalton to Atlanta, being at the siege at the latter place. After the evacuation of Atlanta, he was with the army in front of Sherman to the sea-board, and, after nearly two years' hard service, was disbanded under the terms of Johnston's surrender. Mr. Butler was married at Ripley, July 5, 1876, to Miss Ada P. Glass, daughter of the present member of Congress from that district. Mrs. Butler was born in Ripley, Tenn., June 24, 1857. Mr. Butler is a Democrat and a Mason. He owns 300 acres of land, on which he raises cotton and grain, but gives his chief attention to stock. The farm is situated on the Newport News & Mississippi Valley Railroad, near Flippin's, where our subject is a prominent merchant. Mr. Butler is a man of fine social position, and of influence and business capacity, exceeding popular in his community.

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M. T. Campbell, a prominent citizen and farmer of the Eleventh District of Lauderdale County, was born July 18, 1821, in Caroline County, Va., and is a son of William and Susan (Burruss) Campbell, who were both born in Virginia, the father in 1775, and died in 1833, and the mother died in 1823. Mr. Campbell is of Scotch descent. He was educated at Hallowell College at Alexander, Va., graduating in 1843, and immediately after took charge of Rappahannock Academy, in Caroline County, teaching this school a year and a half, then taught a private school at his residence for fifteen years, the place being called White Hall. In 1864 he moved to Georgia, and took charge of the female institute at Albany, Ga. In 1868 he moved to Ripley, Tenn., and first took charge of the male school, and then the female institute, which he held for four years. At the expiration of this time he moved to his farm in Lauderdale County, and has since given all of his time to farming. December 8, 1844, he married Julia A. B. White, daughter of James I. And Elizabeth White. She was born February 22, 1823. Seven children were born to this marriage -- five sons and two daughters. Mr. Campbell is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and a Democrat. As an educator he was quite successful, and is a most cultured, agreeable gentleman.

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J. B. Carson, one of the early settlers of Lauderdale County, is a son of S. M. and Jane (Carpenter) Carson. The father was born in Virginia in 1800, and the mother in Kentucky in 1799. They were married in Kentucky, and in 1825 they moved to Tennessee and located in Carroll County, living in Carroll and Henderson Counties until 1836, when they moved to Mississippi, then moved to Shelby County, Tenn., and in 1849 to Lauderdale County. Six of the seven children born to them are living. Both parents were strict Presbyterians, and Mr. Carson a Whig. During the time of the militia, he was commissioned colonel by Gov. Cannon; he was sheriff of Henderson County for two terms, and made farming and merchandising his business. His wife died in 1865, and he died in 1885. J. B. Carson, our subject, is of Scotch-Irish descent and was born September 10, 1830 in Carroll County, received a good education, and, after he was grown, farmed and taught school for three years. In 1854 he was elected constable of his district, and four years later, tax collector. In 1861 he went into the Confederate service, Company K, Ninth Tennessee Infantry, as third sergeant; the same year he was appointed quartermaster of his regiment, but resigned in 1863, and went on post duty, but in 1864 was discharged on account of ill health. After the war he engaged in merchandising, and in 1858 he married Louise A. Stuart, who only lived about a year, and since then he has never remarried. Before the war he was a Whig, but now a Democrat, and has held the office of tax collector a term; he is now county coroner, and has been for six years. While not a member of any church, he is of Presbyterian faith, and has been a citizen of Lauderdale County for thirty-seven years, being widely known and highly esteemed.

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L. R. Coleman, a resident and merchant of Glimp, Tenn., was born March 20, 1844, in Haywood County, and is the son of John A. and Susan (Pettus) Coleman. The father was born in Virginia in 1813, and came to Haywood County, Tenn., in 1836, remaining there until 1857, when he moved to Lauderdale County and located at Fulton, and in 1872 moved to Arkansas, where he died in 1878. The mother was also a native of Virginia, but died in Haywood County, in 1856. Our subject was of Irish descent. He remained on the farm with his father until twenty-one years of age, when he married and commenced farming for himself, continuing until 1873, when he commenced merchandising at Fulton, continuing four years; then was a merchant at Henning, Tenn., for six years, and in 1883 moved to Glimp, where he is still a successful merchant, and, in connection with his business, is running a large saw-mill. Mr. Coleman was a magistrate in the Third District for awhile, and after moving to the Tenth District, was elected, in 1885, magistrate. In 1866 he married Fannie Pettus, and they have had eight children, viz.: Mattie, Vennie, Hewett, Cecil, Ida, Susie, Lester and Lettie; the last two are twins. Mr. Coleman is a substantial citizen and a self-made man, and has accumulated his property by his own untiring energy and judicious management. He served three years and a half in the Confederate Army, in the Seventy Tennessee Cavalry. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge at Fulton, Lodge No. 359, and of the K. of H., at Henning. Mr. and Mrs. Coleman are active members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He is politically a Democrat, and a man of influence and fine social standing.

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Capt. Champ C. Conner, a farmer and lumber dealer, of Lauderdale County, is a son of Champ C., and Ann E. (Slaughter) Conner, both natives of Virginia, the father born in 1811, and the mother in 1819. They married and lived in their native State until 1836, when they moved to Lauderdale County, then to Haywood County, and then to Hernando, Miss. Two sons and four daughters were born to them. The father was an earnest and able minister, commencing when still a boy to labor in the Master's cause, and for over fifty years was actively engaged as minister in the Missionary Baptist Church, being a man of rare pulpit oratory and of fine ability, his attainments being the result of his own efforts and application. For many years he was president of the Mississippi Female College, at Hernando, Miss., at the same time continuing his ministerial work, and preaching often three sermons a day. After the college burned, he gave all of his time to his church work, and, after zealously working in this cause, died at the age of sixty-four, and in 1883 his faithful wife died. Capt. Conner, our subject, is of Irish, English and Welsh descent, and the only surviving son; he was born April 21, 1841, in Lauderdale County; was educated at Madison College, at Brownsville, and the University of Mississippi. In 1861 he volunteered in a company of college boys, known as the University Grays, and after the first battle of Manassas he was transferred to the Army of the West, raised Company K, Fourteenth Tennessee Cavalry, and was appointed captain, serving in that capacity until the close of the war. During four years' faithful service, he was twice wounded -- first at Lafayette, Ga., and at Athens, Ala., his horse was shot from under him, and he was severely wounded at Sulphur Tressle, Tenn. Capt. Conner has, since the war, engaged in farming and merchandising, and in 1870 married Tillie Stephenson, and they have had four children: Hammett S., Champ C., Phillip S. and Hallie E. Capt. Conner is a Missionary Baptist; Mrs. Conner a Presbyterian. In politics he is an ardent Democrat. As a business man he has been very successful. For thirty-five years he has been a resident of Lauderdale County. He is a man of fine social standing and business qualifications.

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James M. Crocker, an early settler of Lauderdale County, is a son of William J. and Peachey (Wait) Crocker. His father was born in South Carolina, and his mother in Virginia. When young she moved to South Carolina, where they were married and lived until 1826, when they moved to West Tennessee, locating in Benton County, and in 1832 they moved to what is now Lauderdale County, where they spent the rest of their lives. They had thirteen children -- only two living. Both parents were Primitive Baptists, and the father was a soldier in the war of 1812, a strong Whig, and a successful farmer. He died in his seventy-fourth year, in 1856, and the mother in her seventy-third year, in 1862. James M. Crocker is of English descent, and was born August 25, 1825, in South Carolina; was raised on a farm and had little schooling, and always cared for his parents until their death. In 1853 he married S. A. Condray, born November 9, 1832, and by this marriage had four children, three living: John B., Frances E. L. and James F. Mr. Crocker and the oldest son are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and Mrs. Crocker of the Primitive Baptist Church. The daughter is of the Christian Church. In 1864 Mrs. Crocker died, and the next year he married Louisa, a sister of his first wife, born September 26, 1836. They have had no children. Mr. Crocker owns 142 acres of land, which he has acquired by his own labor; he has taken great pains to educate his children well. The oldest son, John B., is a graduate of East Tennessee University, where he made one of the highest records ever made by a student of that college, and is now head draughtsman in the Nile Tool Works at Hamilton, Ohio. For fifty-four years our subject has been a resident of Lauderdale County, and has a reputation for honesty and integrity that will be a legacy for his children that they may justly prize.

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Andrew Crockett, trustee of Lauderdale County, was born May 29, 1854, in Williamson County, Tenn., his parents were Joseph and Sarah A. (Robinson) Crockett, who were both natives of Williamson County, where they were raised and married. In 1855 they moved to Lauderdale County, and made it their home. The father was a farmer, and politically a Democrat. He did not belong to any church, but the mother was a Methodist. Eight children were born to them, four sons and two daughters now living. The father died in 1877; since then the mother has lived a widow at the old homestead. Our subject was raised on the farm, and worked hard; had poor school advantages. He remained with his mother until twenty-one years of age; a year later he was elected constable and at the same time acted as deputy sheriff, then had a grocery store for a year at Double Bridges. In 1880 Mr. Crockett was elected sheriff, and for six years held the office, giving entire satisfaction in the discharge of his duties, and in 1886 was elected to the important office of trustee, and has filled some important office ever since he attained his majority, which speaks well for the confidence and esteem he receives from his fellow citizens. Mr. Crockett is still unmarried, and is quite popular in the society of Ripley.

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J. T. Newton Cusick was born in Haywood County, Tenn., May 16, 1847, and is the oldest of five sons and three daughters born to Newton M. and Sarah A. (Lawrence) Cusick, being of Irish-English descent. His father was born in Guilford County, N. C., and came with his parents to Tennessee, in 1824, and settled near Wellwood, Haywood County, when the country was a wilderness, and married in that county, living there until 1856, when he moved to Lauderdale County, settling near Double Bridges, where he continued to reside until his death, December 1, 1873. He served his district as magistrate for six years, and was a useful, influential citizen of the county. Our subject's mother was born in Granville County, N.C., and is still living on the old homestead. Mr. Cusick was raised and educated on the farm. Most of his time has been given to mechanical work, until the last few years he has bee a clerk and book-keeper in a general merchandise store at Double Bridges, and has held the office of magistrate for four years, discharging the duties in a most satisfactory way. Mr. Cusick is a Democrat and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and gives freely of his means to all charitable and religious enterprises.

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Dr. Alexander H. Dunavant, a prominent physician of Lauderdale County, Tenn., located near Double Bridges, was born in Franklin, Tenn., August 20, 1821, and was the oldest of twelve sons and two daughters, born to Leonard and Sarah B. (Reid) Dunavant, and is of English and French extraction. His father was born in Amelia County, Va., January 8, 1792, came to Tennessee in 1810, and settled in Franklin, Tenn., where he remained until 1822, when he moved to Little Harpeth, between Franklin and Nashville, giving his attention to farming, interspersed with house-joining, which was his trade. In 1833 he moved to that part of Dyer County that is now Lauderdale, settling two and a half miles southeast of Key Corner, and a year later moved to three miles farther south, where he died September 10, 1869. The mother was born in Williamson County May 23, 1803, and died at the homestead in Lauderdale County, October 26, 1856. Dr. Dunavant was raised on a farm, and after completing his education read medicine under Dr. G. H. Hooper, and attended lectures in the medical department of the university at Nashville, taking his first course in the winter of 1853-54 and graduating in 1854-55. He was married by Dr. J. B. McFerrin in Nashville, March 20, 1854, to Miss Maria G. Dobson, a daughter of J. E. Dobson, a cabinet workman. Eight children wee born to this union, five of them now living; Sarah B. M., Grundy Bell, Fannie, Alexander Ried and Minnie. Mrs. Dunavant was born in Murfreesboro September 5, 1833. Dr. Dunavant is a Democrat, casting his first presidential vote for Henry Clay in 1844. He was in the Mexican war, and is exceedingly popular both as a man and a physician.

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Alonzo Dunavant, a prominent farmer of Lauderdale County, was born in Williamson County, Tenn., July 12, 1826. His father was born in Amelia County, Va., and when eighteen years of age came with his parents to Tennessee. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was in the battles of Horse Shoe and Emuchfau and New Orleans; was married about 1818 to Miss Margaret T. Giddings. She died without children, and he married Miss Sarah B. Ried, and twelve sons and two daughters were born to them, our subject being the fourth child. A portion of this family were born on Little Harpeth River, where the father settled a few years after his second marriage, and moved to West Tennessee in 1833, settling near Double Bridges, where he died in 1869. The mother of our subject was born in Sumner County, Tenn., in 1802, and died in 1856. Alonzo Dunavant was raised on the farm, and secured a common school education, and has made farming his chief business. He married in Lauderdale County, November 30, 1853, Mary E. Mitchell, daughter of Zachariah Mitchell, a prominent farmer. Five sons and a daughter were born to them, four now living: Margaret, Eudora, James F., John V., and William A. D. Mrs. Dunavant was born in Middle Tennessee January 2, 1832, and died January 1, 1886. M. Dunavant belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South, as his wife did also. He is a stanch Democrat; cast his first presidential vote for Gen. Taylor. He owns 380 acres of land and raises grain, stock and cotton. The farm is near Double Bridges, eleven and one-half miles north of Ripley, Tenn., and has a splendid residence on it. Mr. Dunavant is one of Lauderdale's substantial citizens.

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J. W. Duncan, an extensive merchant and cotton planter of Golddust, Lauderdale County, was born January 26, 1848, at Rising Sun, Ind., and was the oldest of seven children born to Wilson N. and Frances E. Duncan. The father was a native of Virginia, and died in 1881 in Golddust. The mother was a native of Indiana and died in 1870. The father was a steamboatman, and our subject was engaged in the same business when fifteen years of age, at Cincinnati, Ohio, until 1876, when he commenced merchandising at Ashport and Golddust, and has since continued. During the war he was on steamboats employed by the Government to transport goods from the war department. July 11, 1877, he married Amelia B. Volkmar, the daughter of Frederick and Mary Volkmar, of Memphis, Tenn., and they have had three children: Berdie May, born August 1878; Willie, born October 1882, and Fannie, born September 18, 1886. Mr. Duncan has made his money since the war by close application to business and good management. For ten years he has acted as postmaster at Ashport and is a member of the Masonic Lodge (De Soto 229) at Memphis, Tenn., and is a firm Democrat. He is one of the most extensive cotton planters in this part of the state, and owns a steam cotton gin, in addition to a large stock of general merchandise. He has never had a partner in business in his life, and is now worth $25,000 free of any incumbrance. He is one of the solid men of the county.

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Bartlett C. Durham, clerk of circuit court, is a son of Albert S. and Mary (Cleaves) Durham, both natives of Orange County, N.C., he born in 1815, and she in 1818. They were married in that county, and remained there till 1845, when they moved to northern Mississippi, and there passed the remainder of their days. Their family consisted of five children, four sons and one daughter. In 1856 the mother died, and two years later the father married Mrs. Jane E. Balch, and to this union were born four children. The father was a member of the Methodist Church, as were also both wives. He was a farmer and an uncompromising Democrat. He died in 1869. Our subject inherits English blood form bother paternal and maternal ancestors, and was born September 8, 1842. He grew up on the farm, and was educated at the country schools. At the age of eighteen he volunteered in Company E, First Mississippi Infantry, where, after serving a while as private, he was promoted to the position of sergeant, and from that to quartermaster-sergeant, and finally to second lieutenant, holding that position till the close of the war. He was one of the brave boys who defended Fort Donelson, where he was captured and taken to Camp Morton, Ind. After six month's imprisonment he was exchanged, and again re-entered the service; was again taken at Port Hudson, La., but, paroled, thereupon he a third time joined his comrades. During four years' service he never received a wound. At the close of the war he entered a dry goods house, where he remained till 1868. He then moved to Lauderdale County, and in 1869 was married to Melissa V. Shelton, a native of this county, born April 29, 1847, and this union resulted in the birth of six children. Mr. Durham is a farmer, a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist Church. In connection with his farming interests he ran a mill. He was occupied the position of magistrate and circuit court clerk, holding the latter position for the third time, and has proved a faithful public servant and a trustworthy citizen. At his last election he received 2,841 out of 3,214 votes cast. On the 18th of October, 1886, his faithful companion passed away, after many months of wasting sickness.

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