TNGenWeb Project
The Goodspeed Publishing Co., History of Tennessee, 1886
Biographical Sketches
Henderson County

Transcribed David Donahue

Anderson, Jackson
Barry, William V.
Beacham, G. W.
Bray, Felix R.
Brooks, W. F.
Cochran, J. L.
Cunningham, A. B.
Davidson, R. A.
Dennison, P. J.
Diffee, Clark
Dodds, James C.
Elkins, William
Flake, Euphrates
Florence, G. W.
Foster, H. W.
Fuller, James H.

Galloway, M. L.
Hall, J. N.
Hassell, Isaac W.
Howard, Samuel
Knowles, J. W. H.
Laws, G. L.
Lockhart, John C.
Logan, W. T.
Long, William B.
McCall, G. W.
McCall, John E.
McCallum, D. E.
McHaney, W. C.
McHaney, La Fayette F.
Mynders, S. A.
Pearson, Peter

Pearson, John
Powers, Stephen
Segraves, Moses
Smith, T. A.
Smith, John A.
Stanford, L. A.
Stubblefield, T. M.
Taylor, John M.
Teague, J. A.
Timberlake, E. J.
Warren, William H.
White, O. P.
Whitehead, E. G.
Williams, Richard
Wilson, J. T.
Woods, Levi S.

 

Jackson Anderson

        Hon. Jackson Anderson, a well known agriculturist of the Seventeenth District, was born in 1831, in Edgecombe County. N.C., a son of John and Nancy (Taylor) Amdeuou. The parents were born in same State and county as our subject; the father in 1801, and the mother in 1800. John Anderson resided in his native State until after his marriage. In 1837 be immigrated to Henderson County; purchased property where he now resides. He was one of the earliest settlers and is the oldest person in the county; he is well known and highly respected. His wife was of Dutch descent; was the mother of five children. Jackson was the only one who lived to be grown. Mrs. Anderson lived to a ripe old age, honored and beloved by all. She departed this life in 1883. The subject of this sketch was about six years old when his parents came to Henderson County; he remained with them until after his majority; in 1853 he married Miss Harriet E. Jackson, daughter of Wm. P. and Martha Jackson. Mrs. Anderson was born in 1837 and died in 1866. She bore four children: Emily Melvina, wife of Jesse Holmes: William H., deceased; John Water and James Y. After marriage Mr. Anderson located where he now resides, near the old homestead. He owns about 800 acres of valuable land, and has a desirable home. He is one of the most enterprising and influential men of the count; and by honor and integrity has won the confidence and esteem of the entire community. In 1859 he was elected magistrate of the Nineteenth Division, adjusting all cases brought before him with satisfaction for twenty-three years. In 1882 he was elected to represent Henderson County in the State Legislature. He served with so much credit and distinction that he was re-elected in 1884. He is a stanch and leading Republican; he was a Whig previous to the war; cast his first vote for Gen. Scott in 1852. He is a Mason, belongs to Juno Lodge, No. 64, and is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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William V. Barry

        William V. Barry, the able editor and publisher of the Lexington Progress, was born in McNairy County, Tenn. in 1858 and is the second of a family of eight children born to Dr. Daniel and Eliza J. (Moore) Barry. The father is a native of Tennessee, born in 1830, and a physician, and surgeon by profession. He graduated at Memphis in 1852, and the same year married and located at Purdy. He has since that time made Purdy his home, with the exception of from 1874 to 1878, when he resided in Wayne County. In connection with his practice he had at various times edited papers, and at present is editor of the Democrat at Purdy. Mrs. Eliza J. (Moore) Barry died in 1878 at the age of forty-six years. The following year Dr. Barry married Miss Georgia Treadwell. Dr. Barry is one of the oldest, most respected, and most Influential men in McNairy County. Our subject was educated in the schools of Purdy and remained at home until his majority, after which he taught school for one term. In 1880 C. D. Barry, brother of William, established at Decaturville a paper called the Decatur Beacon, the first newspaper ever published in Decatur County. William was his assistant, and in 1881 he assumed the entire control and continued the publication until 1884, when he moved to his present location and began the Lexington Progress, which has for its motto "We speak of men as we find them, and of things as they are unfolded to us." It is a newsy, interesting paper, and has an extensive circulation. Mr. Barry ranks among the leading journalists of West Tennessee. January, 1883, he married Mollie A., daughter of C. P. and Nancy J. Dennison. Mrs. Barry was born in Henderson County, 1868, and is the mother of three children: Charles L., Henry D. and one other. Mr. Barry is an earnest catholic and Democrat. His first presidential vote was east for Hancock. He is a pleasant, courteous gentleman, and very popular.

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G. W. Beacham

        G. W. Beacham, an enterprising farmer of the Twelfth District, was born in Henderson County, in 1834, and is one of a family of three children born to Daniel S. and Vina (Shepard) Beacham. The father was born in 1810, in Anson county, N.C. He immigrated to Henderson County when a youth, where he lived at time of his marriage. About 1837 he moved to Wilcox County, Ala., remaining there ten years, going to Clark County, Miss., where he died in 1886. He was twice married and the father of seven children. The first wife was Martha Piles. The second wife, and mother of G. W., was born in Henderson County; died in 1836. The subject of this sketch was raised without a mother's love or care, but remained with his father until the outbreak of the war, when he became one of the valiant "boys in grey." He enlisted in Company A, Eighth Tennessee Infantry; was engaged in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta and Nashville, also in several other skirmishes. At the battle of Murfreesboro he was wounded in the thigh by a ball and disabled for six months. He served until the surrender. November 14, 1866, he married Miss A. Neislar, who was born in 1826, a daughter of David Neislar, of Henderson County. To this union three children were born: Josephene, Levina Jane and Nancy Ann. Mrs. Beacham died September 28, 1874. November 14, 1875, Mr. B. married the second time to Miss Nancy Jane Hodgins, born in Henderson County in 1853, a daughter of David M. Hodgins. To this last marriage seven children were born: Mary Ellen, Sallie, William E., George H.. John W., Mahala and Lucinda. Mr. Beacham owns about 500 acres of valuable land in the Twelfth District, where he has been living for several years. He has made a decided success in farming, and is known as one of the county's most flourishing and prosperous agriculturists, and a worthy citizen. He is a Republican, casting his first vote for A. Lincoln in 1864. He is a Mason of good standing, belongs to Lodge No. 440. Mrs. Beackam is an estimable lady, and a devoted member of the Methodist Church South.

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Felix R. Bray

        Felix R. Bray, merchant at Lone Elm and member of the firm of Bray & Co., was born in Henderson County in 1847, a son of John and Minerva Ann (Walker) Bray. The father is of English descent, born in Randolph County, N.C., in 1820. He immigrated to Decatur County, Tenn., in 1837., After his marriage, which occurred in 1842, came to Henderson County to the Tenth District. engaging in agricultural pursuits for a number of years. In 1882 he became a citizen of Lone Elm, since which time he has been hotel keeping. His wife was born in North Carolina, 1827, and has borne six children: William H.; Nancy J., wife of C. P. Dennison; Felix R., Curry, and Askew and Alice, twins. The subject of this sketch received his education in his native county. December 25, 1867, he married Miss Kittie Fuller, daughter of James H. and Eleanor Fuller. Mrs. Bray was born in the county in 1849, and by this union has nine children: Demonia, Sidney M., Eleanor, Millie, Katie, Lizzie, Artie, James H. and an infant son. In 1873 Mr. Bray established a general store at Lone Elm, in which business he has since been engaged, carrying a first-class and large stock of goods. By his attention to business, courtesy to patrons, and ability he has succeeded In establishing an extensive and profitable trade. He is a Republican, gave his first vote for U. S. Grant in 1868; is a Mason, belonging to Lodge No. 467, Chapter and Council Mason of Lexington. He and Mrs. Bray are devoted member of the Primitive Baptist Church.

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W. F. Brooks

        W. F. Brooks, clerk and master of the chancery court of Henderson County. was born in the town where he now resides, in 1842; he is the youngest and only living one of a family of four children born to William and Margaret (McCauley) Brooks. The father was born in Newtonlavady, Ireland, in 1805. He emigrated from his native land in 1822 to Hardinsville, Middle Tenn., and began merchandising; in 1832 he moved to Lexington, continuing the sale of goods. In 1835 he visited the Emerald Isle and married Miss McCauley, who was born in Londonderry in 1811. They at once came to America. In 1860 they went on a visit to the scenes of their youth. After a mercantile life of thirty-four years in Henderson County, and one which was replete with success, Mr.. Brooks in 1865 turned his business over into the hands of the son, W. F. and December 31, of same year, died. His good wife's death occurred six weeks previous to his own. The subject of this sketch received an excellent education in the academy at Lexington, Andrew College, Trenton and West Tennessee College, Jackson. In 1860 he departed for Europe, making an extended visit of two years, seeing all the principal cities and curiosities of that country. He returned to America in 1862 and during the war remained in the Northern States; coming home in 1865. he assumed charge of his father's business, the next year entering into partnership with Saml. Howard and A. H. Rhodes in merchandising. Mr. Brooks was manager. He continued mercantile life until 1875, having different partners at various times, when he engaged in farming. Mr. Brooks has always affiliated with the Democratic party, casting his first vote for George B. McClellan; although the county has a Republican majority of over 300, Mr. Brooks is so highly regarded, popular and efficient, that he has held public offices for a period of fifteen years. In 1871 he was appointed deputy sheriff, serving two years; in 1876 he became deputy county court clerk, and served twenty-one months; in 1877 he was elected county superintendent of public instruction for two years; in 1879 he was appointed by Judge G. H. Nixon, clerk and master of chancery court, and in 1885 was reappointed to the same position. December 25, 1867, he married Miss M. .E. Covey, who was born in Henderson County, in 1847, and a daughter of A. K. Covey. Mr. and Mrs. Brooks are devoted members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, in which Mr. Brooks has been an elder for six years. He is also a member of the A. O. U. W. Lodge, No. 32, of Lexington, and K. of H., Lodge No. 199, of Jackson.

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J. L. Cochran

        Prof. J. L. Cochran. of Sardis, Tenn., was born in Mississippi in 1847, son of S. K. and Nancy (Talley) Cochran. The father was of Irish descent, born in 1808 in Marion County. N.C. He came to Middle Tennessee in 1829, and located in Marshall, where he lived at the time of his marriage to Miss Talley, by whom he had A family of nine sons and five daughters. Mr. Cochran was a skillful cabinet-maker. In 1841 he moved to Pontotoc County. Miss., where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. After the death of his first wife he married Miss Mary Ann Orman, of Alabama, who bore him six children. She still resides in Mississippi, where (her husband died in 1888. Our subject remained with his parents until he reached his majority. He had very limited educational advantages, as his time was employed in earning a livelihood. He left home the possessor of two suits of clothes, $30 in his pocket and little or no learning, but feeling keenly the need of knowledge he at once determined to obtain an education and began making efforts for accomplishing this end. He applied himself closely and diligently, without the aid of an instructor, to gain sufficient information that he might earn money to pay his tuition and board at school. He returned to Tennessee, entered the Union Academy which he was enabled to attend for four years. In 1871 he began teaching, and taught the first six sessions in the same district of Bedford County, thus favorably illustrating his success as a teacher. At one time he had ninety pupils enrolled. In 1879 he became principal of McClure's Institute, holding that position for three years; then taught seven months in Thomasville, Ga.; came back to Tennessee, and since that time has been a resident of Sardis, where he organized the high schools and conducted them for three years in a highly commendable manner. He is universally spoken of as an efficient teacher and a most excellent disciplinarian, He also instructs in all the dead languages: Latin, Greek, etc. July, 1873, he married Miss Ophelia Hardin, a native of Marshall County, and the daughter of Rev. Robert Hardin, D.D. Mrs. Cochran presented her husband with two bright children: Amy Bemis (named after the daughter of Dr. Bemis. of New Orleans), and Thomas A. Prof. Cochran is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for Seymour and Blair. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge, No. 137, of Farmington, Tenn., being a Master Mason. The past summer he spent in looking after the interests of his valuable farm which contains about 592 acres. Prof. Cochran is, in every sense of the word, a self-made man. By his own efforts and force of character he has risen from poverty and obscurity, to be acknowledged by all as one of the most cultivated, respected and substantial men in the entire community. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. He taught school at Sulphur Springs, Lincoln Co., Tenn., from 1886 to June, 1887, and then at Spring Place, Marshall Co., Tenn., from 1887 until he was elected principal of McClure's Institute.

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A. B. Cunningham

        A. B. Cunningham, an enterprising farmer of the Seventh District, was born December, 1829, in Henderson County, a son of Ransom and Sarah (Rice) Cunningham. The father was born in Virginia in 1797. When an infant his parents moved to Granville County, N.C., where he remained until after the time of his marriage. He came to Henderson County in 1825, and settled in the Eighteenth District, and lived there until 1844, when he went to the Tenth District, making that his home for about five years. The last year of his life was spent in the Seventh District. At one time he owned 400 acres of fine land; he was one of the oldest settlers and best known men in the section. His death occurred in 1875. His wife was born in North Carolina in 1804; was the mother of eight children, of whom A. B. is the fourth and only surviving one. Mrs. Cunningham departed this life in 1862. The subject of this sketch received a fair education in the schools of his native county, and made his home with his parents until about the age of twenty-five. In 1855 he was united in marriage to a daughter of B. J. Young, Miss Mary Elizabeth, who was born in Henderson County in 1838. To this union four children were born: John, Josella, Martha (wife of John Gardner) and Walter. After his marriage, Mr. Cunningham settled In the Seventh District, where he now resides; he has been unusually successful in all his undertakings, owning about 1,000 acres of fine land; has been operating a grist-mill for a considerable length of time, and for six years a cotton-gin, making about 125 bales per season. In politics he is very conservative, voting strictly for principle, not for party. His first vote was given Gen. Scott (1852). He is a Mason of good standing; belongs to Juno Lodge, No. 43. He and his estimable wife are both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

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R. A. Davidson

        Dr. R. A. Davidson, a well known and skillful physician, of Lexington, is a native of Lawrence County, Tenn., and the fourth child of a family of eight, born to John D. and Mary (Wasson) Davidson. The father is of Irish descent, born in North Carolina in 1818. He came with his father, John D., Sr., to Tennessee in 1827, and located in Bedford County. After a few years they moved to Lawrence County, where John D., Sr., died. John D., Jr., remained at the same place several years and was married in 1865. He became a resident of Henderson County, Fourth District, where he purchased a large tract of land, about 870 acres, where he now resides. His wife was born in 1828, in Lawrence County. Our subject received his literary education at Lawrenceburg; came to Henderson County when about thirteen years of age, and in 1870 entered into a clerkship in a grocery store for Caraway & Stegall, of Lexington. In 1874 he embarked in the same business for himself, continuing for three years and meeting with success. Much of his leisure time, during the year 1875, had been devoted to the study of medicine. Following the advice of Dr. John Howard, in 1876-77, he attended the medical department of Louisville University, where he graduated in March, 1877. He then returned to Lexington and began to practice. He is now recognized as one of the eminent and leading physicians of the county, where he has an extensive and lucrative practice. The Doctor is a Democrat, casting his first presidential vote for Hancock in 1880. He is also a Mason, member of Lodge No. 87, Lexington. He has many friends by whom he is held in high esteem.

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P. J. Dennison

        P. J. Dennison, a member of the well known dry goods firm of Dennison & McCall, of Lexington, was born in 1851 in Henderson County; is the eleventh of a family of sixteen children (of whom eight are living), born to Robert R. and Nancy D. (Walker) Dennison. The father was of Irish origin, born in 1814, in Virginia. When a small boy he left his native State with his father, Stephen Dennison. After a few years they located in Decatur County, W. Tenn. About 1857 he became a resident of Henderson County, where he resided until his death in 1868. Robert B. was quite a young man when he came to the county where he lived at the time of his marriage. He settled in the Sixteenth District, which has since been his home. His wife was born in 1820 in North Carolina. She is still living, greatly respected. The subject of this sketch received his education in the Henderson County schools, and remained at home with his parents until about twenty-one; was a salesman in his father's dry goods store for three years previous to that time. In 1872 he opened a store at Lone Elm; remained there until 1881, with the exception of one year spent at Moore's Hill. He established a grocery store at Lexington and one year later, 1882, formed a partnership with Mr. G. W. McCall. By their good management, attention to business, and courtesy, have gained a liberal patronage, and have one of the leading stores of the place. August, 1872, Mr. Dennison married Miss Clemmie McKelvy, of South Caroline, born in 1849. They are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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Clark Diffee

        Clark Diffee, a prosperous farmer and well known resident of the Second District, was born in Henderson County in 1832; is the second of a family of six children born to Moses and Mary (Lollar) Diffee. The father was born in Randolph County, N.C. in 1806; was of English descent. In 1828 he immigrated to Henderson County, with his father, John Diffee. After his marriage he settled in the Seventh District on the old home place; the last few years of his life were spent with his son Clark; his death occurred in 1876, He was one of the earliest settlers, most substantial farmers and respected citizens of the county. His wife was born in the same State and county as himself, in 1807, and died in 1873. Clark Diffee remained with his parents until the war between the North and South broke out. He entered the Confederate service in May 1861, enlisting in Company I, Thirteenth Regiment Tennessee Infantry. He participated in the engagements at Belmont, Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta, Nashville, Franklin and many skirmishes. He was on active duty until December 24, 1864, when he returned home. During the entire time of his gallant service, he was fortunate enough to have never received a severe wound, nor to have been made a prisoner. August 29, 1867, he married Miss Mary B., daughter of Dr. John Parsons. Mrs. Diffee was born in Decatur County, in 1848; is the mother of six children: Robert L,, John T., Dora B., Bettie May, Charles V. and Johnnie. In 1868 Mr. Diffee purchased 838 acres of land in the Second District where he located and has since resided. He has all modern improvements and best of buildings on his place, and owns in all, about 954 acres. For the past ten years he has been running a cotton-gin, ginning, on an average, about forty bales a season. He is one of the most enterprising and successful farmers in the county, where he is universally esteemed. He is a staunch Democrat; gave his first vote in 1856 for Filmore. His wife is a devoted and respected member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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James C. Dodds

        James C. Dodde, a well known farmer of the Fifth District, was born in Henderson County, 1837, the oldest of a family of five boys and eleven girls born to Thomas N. and Mary G. (Crook) Dodds. The father was of English descent, born in 1810. When a youth he came to Henderson County with his father, James Dodds; they located in the Third District, a portion of the county which was then called Chester County; they were among the pioneer settlers. Thomas M. after his marriage moved to time Fifth District, residing there until 1843, when he sold out, and bought property in the Fifth District of Chester County and resided there until his death in 1874. His wife was also of English origin, born in South Carolina in 1820; since Mr. Dodd's death she has been living on the home place with her youngest son. Robert B. James C. received his education in the Henderson County schools, remaining at home until his majority. In November, 1860, he married a daughter of Henry and Catherine Anderson, Miss Mary E., who was born in the county in 1839. To this union, nine children were born: Annie L., wife of C. M. Keys; James W.; John S.; Mamie C.; Oscar L.; Lura E.; Carrie E.; Maggie May, and Robert E. Soon after his marriage the late war broke out and Mr. Dodds donned the gray, enlisting in July, 1862, in Company D, Twenty-first Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, He took active part in many engagements, was at Okalona, Fort Pillow, Nashville and at Brice's Cross-roads, where he received a severe wound in the right shoulder, which disabled him for five months. On December, 1884, he was captured and made prisoner, was taken to Johnson's Island and retained until restoration of peace; on May, 1865, he went to Mississippi, remaining there until 1871, and then returned to his native county. In 1874 he purchased 337 acres in the Fifth District, where he now resides. He has bought a considerable amount of real estate; is one of the most enterprising and prosperous farmers in time section, where he is well known and universally respected. In 1882 he was elected magistrate of his district, and since that time, has adjusted all difficulties brought before him, with judicial fairness and satisfaction to all. He is a Democrat, casting his first vote for John Bell in 1860. Mrs. Dodds is an estimable lady, a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

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William Elkins

        William Elkins, a popular citizen of Lexington and a member of the firm of Galloway & Elkins, was born in Henderson County in 1853 and is the eldest of a family of four children born to Scion and Mary (Galloway) Elkins, both native Tennesseans. The father was born in 1826 of Irish extraction. While a resident of Henderson County he was married and afterward settled in the Second Civil District. About 1858 he moved to Benton County. He was a farmer and died in 1862. His wife was born in 1823. After Mr. Elkins death she married Samuel Whitney, by whom she had two children. William Elkins, our subject, received his education in Henderson County. He began merchandising in 1875 with his uncle, M. S. Galloway, and has remained with him since that time. In 1877 they established a livery stable in connection with their store. It was destroyed by fire in 1878 and the following year they again built, and have one of the best stables in this section, well stocked with fine horses, buggies, double vehicles and all fixtures necessary to the equipment of such a trade. The firm is recognized as one of the most substantial in the county, its members being men of ability, accommodation and honor. In 1878 Mr. Elkins married Miss Nannie Ross, of Henderson County, a daughter of James Ross, an old and respected resident. To this union two children have been born: Bessie and Willie. Mr. Elkins is a Democrat and cast his first vote for S. J. Tilden In 1876.

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Euphrates Flake

        Euphrates Flake, a successful farmer of the Seventeenth District, was born in Henderson County in 1847, a son of William B. and Nancy (Howard) Flake. The father was of Irish origin, born about 1803 in North Carolina; about 1820, with his father, Samuel Flake, immigrated to Henderson County, settling in the Seventeenth District, which at that time contained very few residents. William B. soon after his marriage located near the homestead; he was a prosperous farmer and merchant; had a general store on the farm; he owned about 540 acres of fine productive soil. His death occurred in 1854. His wife was born in North Carolina in 1809, and died in 1859; they had eight children, only two of whom are now living; our subject was the sixth child. After the death of his parents he made his home with his uncle, Dudley L. Flake, who died in 1862. Euphrates then went to live with an uncle in Mississippi, James House, but in 1866 returned to his native county, accepted a position as salesman with P. B. Parker at Wildersville, where he remained four years. In 1873 he established a retail liquor store in Lexington, but only continued there a year. The following three years he was engaged in the same business in Huntingdon. In May, 1878, he married a daughter of Samuel Howard, Miss Bina, a native of Henderson County, born in 1856. To this union two children have been born: Howard and Bettie. In 1882 Mr. Flake purchased 640 acres of land, and located where he now resides. He erected a cotton-gin the same year, which he operates in connection with his farm; he makes on an average, thirty bales per season. He is an enterprising, industrious and prosperous farmer, and good citizen. He is a life-long Democrat, casting his first vote for Seymour and Blair in 1868. He is an old member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge No. 150. Mrs.. Flake is an estimable lady, and a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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G. W. Florence

        G. W. Florence, a prominent merchant of Lexington, was born in Caswell County, N.C., in 1840, a son of J. T. and Alvis (Simmons) Florence, both of whom were of Turkish-French descent, natives of North Carolina. The father was born in 1812 and while a resident of his native State married. In 1842 he immigrated to Benton County, W. Tenn., where for many years he taught school, being one of the pioneer professors of that section. The latter portion of his life he devoted to agricultural pursuits; he departed this life in 1883. The mother was born in 1814, and is still living, beloved by all. Of a family of nine children born to them, eight are still living. The subject of this sketch being the eldest: he was but two years of age when the family came to Tennessee. His education, which is thorough and liberal, was received In Benton County. At the age of eighteen he became salesman in the store of C. K. Wyly at Camden, Tenn., remaining there three years. When the late civil war broke out he donned the gray, and in 1861 enlisted in Company G, Fifty-fifth Regiment, Tennessee Infantry. He took active part in the battles of Island No. 10, Chickamauga, Knoxville and numerous other minor engagements. He was twice captured, the first time was exchanged immediately, but the next time was taken to Fort Donelson and retained about eleven months. He returned home in May, 1885, after the restoration of peace. He resumed work in Mr. Wyly's store; two years later came to Lexington, accepted position as clerk in the house of A. H. Hall; in 1879 they became partners; in 1883 Mr. Florence bought the entire stock, and from that time has conducted the business. He now carries an extensive general stock, including dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes, furniture, wooden-ware, and various other commodities. He is an industrious, energetic and intelligent man; by his integrity and ability has met with unusual success in life. Mr. Florence is a Democrat, casting his first vote for H. Greeley, in 1872; he is a Mason, belonging to Lodge No. 87, of Camden.

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H. W. Foster

        H. W. Foster, farmer of the Sixth District, was born in Halifax County, Va., 1833; he is one of the three living children of a family of ten, born to Joshua and Susan (Adams) Foster. The father was of English extraction, born in 1788, in Nottaway County. Va. While a resident of his native State, he married a lady of Halifax County, who was also of English descent, born in 1801, and departed this life 1867. In 1835 Mr. Foster emigrated from the "Old Dominion" to Henderson County, locating in the Sixth District, where he purchased 300 acres of land and engaged in farming; in 1857 he moved to Yell County, Ark., and in 1868 to Kaufman County, Tex., where he continued his agricultural pursuits. He was an unusually hale and robust man during the greater portion of his life; he died in 1883 at the advanced age of ninety-five years. H. W. Foster was a small child where his parents came to Henderson County, where he received his education, attending school only about five months. He remained at home until about twenty-three years of age; two years previous to that time he began teaching; he taught about twelve sessions in the Sixth, Tenth and Eleventh Districts. December 20, 1857, he married a daughter of Benjamin and Easter Smith, Miss Nancy, who was born in the county in 1833, To this union ten children were born: Fannie W., wife of N.C. Patterson; Leora D., wife. of G. W. Priddy; Mollie A., wife of C. W. Johnson; Joshua B.; Nancy S.; Josephine L.; Samuel H.; George; Phillip T. and James H. When hostilities broke out, Mr. Foster's sympathies were with his people, and September, 1861, he enlisted in Company L Twenty-seventh Regiment, Tennessee Infantry. Be participated in the battles at Perryville, Shiloh and Clifton; after the battle of Shiloh he was commissioned as first lieutenant of his company and remained as such until the reorganization of the army in 1863, when he returned home. In 1873 Mr. Foster purchased 160 acres of land and located where he now resides. For the past twenty-five years he has run a cotton-gin; in 1878 built another one, since which time he has been ginning, on an average, 200 bales per year. He is one of the most flourishing farmers in the county, a man of ability and determination and by his good management and economy has accumulated about 1,230 acres of good land. He is a stanch Democrat, casting his first presidential vote for Fillmore in 1856. He belongs to the I. O. O. F. Lodge, No. 154, Lexington.

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James H. Fuller

        James H. Fuller, of Lone Elm, was born in 1823, in the portion of Humphreys County now called Benton County, a son of Ephraim B. and Mary (Conyers) Fuller, both natives of North Carolina. The father was of English origin, born 1787, in Granville County. At an early date, and after his marriage, he immigrated to Humphreys County; in 1832 became a resident of Henderson County, locating four miles north of Lexington; about 1839 moved to the Twentieth District, remaining there until his death in 1871. His wife was born in 1790, departed this life in 1885; was the mother of nine children, five of whom are still living. James H. was but nine years of age when his parents moved to Henderson County. He remained with them until after his majority, giving them the proceeds of his labor. September 9, 1845, he married Miss Eleanor McCall. a native of the county, born August 21, 1824. a daughter of Andrew and Jane McCall. Mrs. Fuller died January 22, 1874. being the mother of eight children: Harriet F., Martha J., Tallitha C., Mary I., Patrick F., James H.; Joseph W. and William, deceased. Mr. Fuller settled in the Twentieth District and began farming. He commenced a poor man, but by his industry, energy and judicious management, accumulated considerable means and property. He owned 1,000 acres of good land, which he disposed of in 1881, and moved to Lone Elm, where he leads a quiet and retired life. November 22, 1876, he united in marriage with Mrs. Elizabeth Marsh, nee White. Mr. Fuller has always been a Republican, and one of the leading men of his party; gave his first vote for Henry Clay in 1844; in 1846 he was elected magistrate for his district, serving until the war; alter peace was restored he was appointed by Gov. Brownlow, and afterward elected and re-elected, holding the office until 1880. The last fourteen years of his official life he was chairman of the county court. He is one of Henderson County's most substantial, honored and popular residents, a consistent member of the Primitive Baptist Church, a true, Christian gentleman.

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M. L. Galloway

        M. L. Galloway, a well known member of the firm of Galloway & Elkins, was born In Henderson County, March 2, 1835, and is the sixth of a family of seven children born to M. J. and Martha (Norris) Galloway. The father was born in Chatham County, N.C., in 1800, and was of Scotch-Irish descent. He married a native of his State, who was born in 1798. They immigrated to Middle Tennessee in 1824, and a year later located in the Second District of Henderson County. They lived in different parts of the county, and the father was one of its most respected and influential citizens. He was a teacher for several years, also twice a representative of Henderson County in the State Legislature. He died in 1874, two years previous to the death of his widow. Our subject was reared at home and educated in the county schools. He began farming at an early age, continuing until 1875, when he entered the mercantile business in Lexington. Two years later he and Mr. Elkins established a livery and feed stable, but were burned out in 1878. The next year they rebuilt and have now a fine stable, in connection with which they manage a first-class grocery. In 1856 Mr. Galloway married Miss Helen M. Bartholomew, a native of Henderson County, born in 1835. She died in 1884, leaving one child, Amanda W., wife of K. K. Muse. In 1872 Mr. Galloway married Miss P. A. Reed, of Henderson County, and a daughter of W. A. Reed. Mr. Galloway is one of Lexington's worthiest and most substantial citizens. He is a Democrat, and his first presidential vote was given to James Buchanan. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 64, Chapter No. 37.

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J. N. Hall

        J. N. Hall, a leading druggist of Lexington, was born in 1844, near his present place of residence. He is the son of Robert W. and Martha (Thomas) Hall. The father is of Scotch-Irish descent, born in Huntsville, Ala., in 1813. When a youth he commenced clerking in the dry goods store of Mr. Bradley, where he continued in the same capacity for about fifteen year. When about twenty-six years of age he went to Reynoldsburg, Tenn. The following four years he was engaged as clerk, captain or overseer on the Tennessee and Mississippi Rivers. In 1843 he came to Lexington and established a mercantile house, where he displayed marked business qualifications, and met with success. In 1880 he moved two and a half miles out of the town; in 1866 went to Jackson and resumed merchandising; in 1883 he sold out, and has since lived a retired life. He has the confidence and esteem of all. His marriage with Martha Thomas occurred in 1843, at Paris, Tenn., an estimable lady of Henry County, born in 1826, of French-Scotch descent. To them eleven children were born, nine of whom are living, the subject of our sketch being the eldest. He received his education in the academy at Lexington. When quite young he entered his father's store as clerk, and remained there until 1878, when he came to Lexington and opened a first-class drug store, in which business he is still engaged, carrying a large stock of drugs, paints, oils, brushes, perfumes, etc. He is a man of ability and integrity, inheriting largely many of his father's noble traits of character. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and a Mason, belonging to St. John's Lodge, No. 139, of Jackson. He is also a Democrat, and his first presidential vote was given Horatio Seymour in 1868. Mr. Hall was married November 13, 1870, to Lyda Fielder, a native of Lexington and daughter of John S. and Mary P. (McHenry) Fielder. The father is a well known druggist. Mrs. Hall is the mother of three children: Robert W., John F. and Lyda. Mrs. Hall is a true Christian woman, a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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Isaac W. Hassell

        Isaac W. Hassell, the popular hotel proprietor and farmer of Sardis, was born October 19, 1838, in Perry, now Decatur County, and is a son of Nathaniel G. and Pena A. (Raphael) Hassell, both natives of North Carolina. The father was born in 1800, and immigrated to Tennessee in 1836. The following year he married. He was a tanner by trade, and his death occurred in 1858, in Hardin County. His wife, who was born in 1818, married the second time, to Mr. A. B. Craig, who is also deceased. Mrs. Craig resides in Sardis. Isaac W. remained at home until his majority. He then began teaching school, which he continued for ten years in Henderson and Hardin Counties. October 7, 1866, he married Miss Miranda Hanna, a native of Henderson Co., born Jan. 10, 1843, and the daughter of Capt. James Hanna, a well known and prominent man. To Mr. and Mrs. Hassell seven children have been born: James A., Emma D., Mary L, John W., Minnie A., Nellie and Isaac W. Nellie died August 5, 1879, at four years of age. In 1871 Mr. Hassel moved to his present place of residence. He built the first house and was the first postmaster in Sardis. He sold goods at that place for three years, after which he gave his attention to agriculture, and now owns 200 acres of good land. He operated a cotton-gin from 1874 until 1884. The past four years have been devoted to hotel-keeping in Sardis, and he does all in his power for the pleasure and accommodation of his guests and consequently receives a liberal patronage. He was a strong Union man and is now a Republican, casting his first presidential vote for John C. Breckenridge in 1860. He is a Mason of good standing, belonging to Lodge No. 267, Saltillo, Tenn. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Hassell is a man of strong character and independent nature, advocating a principle if he believes it to be right, regardless of the opinions of others. He is enterprising and genial and is held in high regard.

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Samuel Howard

        Samuel Howard, as trustee of Henderson County, and one of its old citizens and farmers, was born in 1823 in North Carolina, son of William and Ursley (Henson) Howard, both of English descent, and both natives of North Carolina. The father was an agriculturist and came to Henderson County in 1825, where he remained until his death. He was one of the first white settlers and most successful farmers, owning about 1,000 acres of land. He died in 1868 and his wife two years later. To them were born twelve children, Samuel being the fifth. He received his education in the common schools of Henderson County, remaining at home until he was twenty-four years of age. In 1847 he married Mary, daughter of Richard and Mary Timberlake. She was born in Henderson County in 1831, and died in 1864. She became the mother of six children, four of whom are living: Richard W, Charles F., James N., and Melvina, wife of K. Flake. Mr. Howard married the second time, in 1870, to Bettie H. Hinkle, a lady of Kentucky. Mr. Howard is a Democrat, previous to the war a Whig, and cast his first presidential vote for Henry Clay in 1844. In 1850 he was elected constable and served two years. In 1853 he was made justice of the peace of the Tenth District, and for three years adjusted all difficulties brought before him with judicial fairness, but resigned after that length of time. In 1877he was elected trustee of Henderson County, by the county court to fill the unexpired term of B. A. Priddy, who resigned. In 1878-80-82-84 he was re-elected by a large majority, thus illustrating his popularity and the satisfaction he had given the people. His successor, Mr. A. G. Douglass, took possession of the office Monday, September, 1886. Mr. Howard is one of the most prosperous farmers in this section, owning about 1,700 acres of valuable land. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, Blue Lodge, No. 64, and Chapter No. ___. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

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J. W. H. Knowles

        J. W. H. Knowles, prominent resident and well known farmer of the Sixth District, as born in Rutherford County, Tenn., in 1829, a son of Edmond and Elizabeth (Matthews) Knowles. The father was of English extraction, born in Sumter District. S. C., In 1739; he immigrated to Rutherford County about 1824, and moved to Henderson County about 1831, locating in the Sixth District, where the remainder of his life was spent; his death occurred en 1882. He was one of the most prosperous farmers in the county, owning at one time 3,000 acres of land; he was also one of the earliest settlers, best known and respected men. His wife was of Irish origin, born in South Carolina in 1801; is stall living and in her eighty-seventh year. The subject of this sketch was only one-and-a-half years old when his parents came to Henderson County; he made his home with them until his majority. May 10. 1836. he married Miss Elizabeth Darden, a native of North Carolina, born in 1827, and a daughter of Miles Darden. who was one of the largest men in the United States, weighing upward of 800 pounds at the time of his death. Mr. and Mrs. Knowles have eight living children: Mary F.: Robert E. and Martha are twins (Martha is the wife of Wm. Webb); James D., Susan A., John M., Hubert F., Lura V. After marriage Mr. Knowles located on a portion of the estate given him by his father, which contained nearly 500 acres, and has resided there since that time. He is an extensive landholder; besides his home and other real estate, he owns eleven fine lots In Henderson. Chester County. He is one of the most enterprising and energetic farmers; has always met with success in all his undertakings; he is well known and universally liked; is a stanch Republican; voted tie first time for Gen. Scott, in 1832. He is a Mason, belongs to Lodge No. 64, of Lexington. He and Mrs. Knowles are esteemed members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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G. L. Laws

        Dr. G. L. Laws, one of the most eminent, respected and substantial physicians and surgeons of the county, is a resident of the Seventeenth District, eight miles north of Lexington. He was born in Russell County, Ala., in 1888, a son of Hiram and G. A. (Sims) Laws. The father was of English-French origin, born in 1803, in Orange County, N.C., where he resided at the time of his marriage, in 1820, immediately after which he immigrated to Carroll County, Tenn., engaging in agricultural pursuits. In 1834 or 1835, he moved to Russell County, Ala., during the Creek and Indian war. The latter part of 1835 or 1837, with his family, he fled from the State to escape the treachery and ferocity of the Indians. He returned to Carroll County, locating near Clarksburg, where he owned 200 acres of land. He died in 1879. His wife was of English descent, born in 1807, in Orange County, N.C. She was the mother of six children, four of whom are living. Her death occurred in 1872. Our subject, Dr. G. L. Laws, was the fifth child; he received his literary education in the common schools of Carroll County, and the academy at Huntingdon, Tenn. When quite a young man he worked as a farmhand; at the age of twenty began teaching school, which he followed for four years, during vacation attending school. When about twenty-three years of age, he began the study of medicine under guidance of Dr. Henry McCall of Clarksburg; in 1860 he entered the medical department of Nashville University, and the following year located at Macedonia, Carroll County, where he began the practice of his profession; a year later he came to Henderson County, settling where he now resides. In November, 1863, he married a daughter of Peter and Mary Ann Pearson, Miss Mary Pearson, who was born in Henderson County in 1843, and who bore him one child, William D. Mrs. Laws died in 1867, and in 1869 he married his sister-in-law, Jemima M. Pearson, a native of the county, born in 1852; they have one child living: Joseph H. The Doctor has an extensive and lucrative practice, and is considered one of the most able physicians and surgeons In the county. He is also one of the most prosperous and successful business men; he owns 1,400 acres of valuable land, and attends to all of his real estate interests. Previous to the war the Doctor was a Whig, and is now a Republican: he cast his first vote for U. S. Grant in 11368. The Doctor and Mrs. Laws are esteemed and earnest members of the Christian Church.

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John C. Lockhead

        John C. Lockhead, one of the most enterprising young farmers of the Tenth District, was, born in Marshall County, Ky., November 12, 1862, a son of John W. and Helen (Ellis) Lockhead. The father was born in 1840 in Scotland: when quite young immigrated to the United States with his parents. locating at Eddyville. Ky. Mr. Lockheed was a firm supporter of the Union, and In 1861 crossed the Mason and Dixon line, going to Illinois. In the fall of 1862, he enlisted In the Fifteenth Kentucky Regiment Cavalry; was elected orderly sergeant. At the end of first year the regiment disbanded; he at once enlisted in the Forty-eighth Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, and was appointed adjutant, having the rank of lieutenant. At Princeton. Ky., he was taken sick with erysipelas and died December 7, 1863. August 15, 1861, he was united in marriage to Miss Helen Ellis, a daughter of Dr. Jonathan and Lucy A. (Gould) Ellis. Mrs. Lockheed was born July 22, 1842, in Jefferson County, N.Y. In April. 1868, she married at Birmingham, Ky., George W. Council, a resident of Lexington, Tenn., and where they immediately made their home. The union was not a happy one and in March, 1884, Mrs. Council obtained a divorce, moving the same year to her farm one mile east of Lexington, where she now resides with her son. They had 670 acres of valuable, productive land. John C. is a young man of sterling qualities, industrious, energetic and a good manager, has the respect and goodwill of all who know him. He is a stanch Republican, casting his first presidential vote for James G. Blaine. The mother is a devoted member of the Christian Church, and universally liked.

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W. T. Logan

        Hon. W. T. Logan, a prominent attorney at law of Lexington, was born at Saltillo, Hardin Co., Tenn., in 1857, a son of Dr. John H. and Sarah (Davey) Logan. The father is of Irish descent, and was born in Marion Co., Ala., in 1826. The grandfather, John Logan, Sr., was a native of Ireland; he participated in the Irish rebellion in 1796, made his escape and came to America, taking up his abode in North Carolina; in 1809 he moved to Marion County, Ala., where he died at the age of fifty-six. John, Jr., when a youth immigrated to Hardin County, Tenn., settling at Saltillo, and commenced practicing medicine, having graduated in 1843 in the medical department of the University of Louisville, Ky. He is still actively engaged in his profession, and for many years has been recognized as one of the leading and most popular physicians in the section in which he lives. His wife is also of Irish extraction, born in 1822; she is the mother of four children, of whom our subject is the third. He received his academic education in his native town; at the age of twenty-two began to read law, his preceptor being Judge Levi S. Woods of Lexington. In June, 1880, he graduated in the law department of Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn., immediately afterward locating in Lexington and entering upon the practice of his chosen profession; he is a man of wonderful talent, brilliancy and depth; one of the most eminent lawyers of the county. In 1884 he was nominated by the Democratic party as the representative of his county in the Legislature. His competitor was the Hon. John B. McCall, a young man of fine ability. They canvassed the county jointly, in which Mr. Logan won the reputation of being an able, logical debater and forcible speaker. In August, for attorney-general, Mr. McCall received over 400 majority, and for Representative Mr. Logan was defeated by the small number of 116. April 25, 1888, he married a daughter of John S. and Mary P. Fielder, Miss Celestia A., who was born in Henderson County in 1862. To this union one child has been born, John F. Mr. Logan is an exemplary Christian, and an earnest member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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William B. Long

        William B. Long was born in Henderson County, Tenn., May 7, 1848, of poor but respectable parentage. His father, Jefferson Long, dying when William was very young, left him in almost destitute circumstances. He was reared by his mother and step-father, "who was also in moderate circumstances," up to the age of seventeen years, after which he started out penniless, with nothing but his unflinching determination to succeed in life. He worked incessantly, almost day and night, until he by dint of hard labor earned a sufficiency to set himself up in business, which he commenced in the village of Middle-burg (Long) in 1880. He was elected justice of the peace over his opponents by a handsome majority in 1882. He has made rapid strides in the way of fame and wealth, and at this early date is worth between $10,000 and $l5,000, and now stands as one of the leading and most enterprising men of his county. Mr. Long is a man of smooth temperament, unassuming, accommodating, and well liked by all unbiased minds who have dealings with him.

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G. W. McCall

        G. W. McCall, a member of the dry goods firm of Dennison & McCall, of Lexington, is a son of Andrew and Jane (Dennison) McCall. The father is of Scotch-Irish extraction, born in South Carolina in 1827; when but three years of age left the Palmetto State with his father, Andrew Dennison [sic.], Sr., immigrating to Henderson County, Tenn., and located in the Twentieth Dist., where the latter bought about 800 acres of land and began cultivation. He was one of the pioneer settlers and best known men in the county; departed this life in 1841 at the age of fifty-one years. Andrew, Jr., was married in 1849, to a lady who was born in Decatur County in 1833, and who bore him eight children, of whom our subject is the third. Mr. and Mrs. McCall are living on- the old homestead, where they own 820 acres of valuable soil. G. W. McCall received a good education in the Henderson County schools, and attended two sessions at McKenzie, Carroll County. In 1873 he accepted a situation in a general store at Fulton, Ky., where he remained two years; he continued clerking for some time in different localities and in 1882 entered into a partnership with Mr. P. J. Dennison, establishing a first-class dry goods house in Lexington. They are both men of energy and ability, and have met with great success in their undertaking. Mr. McCall is a Republican; cast his first vote for the late James A. Garfield in 1880. He is a genial man and worthy citizen, having a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

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John E. McCall

        Hon. John E. McCall, attorney at law, of Lexington, was born at Clarksburg, Carroll Co., Tenn., in 1859, a son of Dr. Henry and Frances (Bowlin) McCall. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in South Carolina in 1817; when seventeen years of age came with his father, Andrew McCall, to Henderson County, settling in the Twentieth District. Andrew died in 1841. When about twenty Henry commenced the study of medicine; he graduated as an M.D. at Nashville University. He resided in Madison County at the time of his marriage; about 1850 he moved to Clarksburg, where he remained until his death, in 1880. Dr. McCall was for many years one of the leading and most skillful physicians and surgeons of Carroll County. His wife was of English origin, born in Alabama in 1827. She was the mother of seven children: Caledonia I., wife of L. F. Williams; George T., an attorney of Huntingdon; M. Jennie, wife of J. W. Scott; Patrick H., a dentist at Clarksburg; James C. R., county court clerk of Carroll County; Ella, and John E., whose literary education was received at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, which he attended for three years; in 1881 he began to read law under direction of Judge Joe Hawkins; in 1888 he located at Lexington, where he commenced his practice. Mr. McCall is an ardent Republican, casting his first vote for Jas. A. Garfield in 1880. In 1884 he was elector on the Blaine and Logan ticket for the Eighth Congressional District. In August, 1886, he was a candidate for attorney-general of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit; the Democratic majority is about 1,000, but Mr. McCall brought it down to 366, thus illustrating his popularity among his people. In November, 1886, he was elected Representative of Henderson County in the State Legislature; his opponent was the Hon. W, T. Logan, a gifted and able lawyer and eloquent speaker; they canvassed the county jointly, which resulted as above mentioned. Mr. McCall is one of the bright and shining lights of the profession, possessing unusual intellect and keen discernment, and is a courteous, genial gentleman. October 14, 1885, he married a daughter of Edward J. and Lula Timberlake, Miss Addle, who was born in Henderson County in 1864. They have one child, Addie. Mrs. McCall is a most estimable lady and member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

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D. E. McCallum

        Dr. D. E. McCallum, a prominent physician and surgeon of Wildersville, was born in. Madison County, Tenn., in 1858, a son of Peter and Boxy (Estis) McCallum. The father was of Scotch descent, born in 1828 in Madison County, where, with the exception of ten years spent in Henderson County, he passed his entire life. He was one of the most prosperous farmers and successful speculators in the section. He owned about 1,000 acres of fine land. He was magistrate of the Thirteenth District for many years. His death occurred in 1880. The mother, who is still living, was also born in Madison County in 1830. She has five children living: John R., who resides at Claybrook, is a farmer and speculator; Duncan E. (our subject); Francis P. lives at his mother's home; of the twins, Annie is at home and Joseph is a student in the literary department of Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn.; Peter L. (deceased). Our subject, Dr. D. E., received his literary education in the University of Tennessee, at Knoxville, which he attended three and a half years. In 1880 he began the study of medicine under the tuition of Dr. Savage, of Jackson. who is now a professor in the Vanderbilt University at Nashville, and from which Institution Dr. McCallum graduated in the medical department in March, 1884. Immediately afterward he located at his present place of residence, and entered upon the exercise of his profession. By his thorough knowledge, skill and courtesy to patrons, he has now an extensive and lucrative practice and is recognized as one of the leading and most popular physicians in the county. He owns about 250 acres of land and a half interest in a cotton-gin, his partners being the Rosser Bros. They made 100 bales in 1886. The Doctor is a Democrat, voting the first time for Cleveland.

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W. C. McHaney

        W. C. McHaney, a retired merchant and respected old resident of Lexington, was born In Pittsylvania County, Va., in 1818, and is the son of Cornelius and Patience (Hurt) McHaney. The father was also born in Pittsylvania. County, Va., in 1780. He was of Irish extraction and a farmer by occupation. In 1835 he immigrated to Henderson County, Second Civil District, where he became possessed of 1,000 acres of land. He was one of the early settlers of West Tennessee, and died August 19, 1849. The mother was of Scotch descent, born in Charlotte County, Va., in 1796, and died in 1836. They had a family of ten children seven sons and three daughters only three of the family now living. Our subject was the fourth child and came to Henderson County when seventeen years of age, having clerked for two years previous to that time. In 1886 he was employed by Gladden, Gorin & Co., of Lexington, in a general merchandise store, where he remained two years. In 1840 he embarked in the grocery business for himself, sold out three years later and established a dry goods house but sold out in 1847. He then moved to the Third District and gave his attention to farming. From 1865 he was interested in a general store at Crucifer, and in 1872 re-opened a dry goods store, which he turned over to his two sons. In 1878, Cornelius F; and John C., and two sons-in-law, Hon. John K Taylor and Judge Levi Wood. He has, since that time, led a retired life. In 1841 he married Miss Louisa Henry, a native of Smith County, Tenn., born in 1821, the daughter of Felix and Caroline Henry, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. To this union were born twelve children, seven of whom are living: Cornelius F.; Amanda L., wife of Hon. John M. Taylor, present congressman from the Eighth Congressional District; Mary S., wife of Hon. Levi S. Wood, present circuit judge of the Eleventh Judicial District; John C.; Elizabeth, wife of William T. Lawler; Nannie L. and Henry A. Mr. McHaney was for forty years one of the solid business men of Henderson County, possessing ability and other characteristics which have enabled him to succeed in all he has ever undertaken. The welfare of the community was always dear to him and he extended a helping hand to all beneficial enterprises. In 1840 he cast his first presidential vote for Harrison but has since been a stanch Democrat. He was elected by the county court in 1842 to fill the unexpired term of S. M. Horton, county register in 1846-47; served as deputy sheriff for two years. He was also one of the commissioners who supervised the building of the courthouse.

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La Fayette F. McHaney

        Hon. La Fayette F. McHaney. one of the Influential and best known residents of the Second District, was born in Pittsylvania County. Va., in 1825. He is the seventh of a family of ten children born to Cornelius and Patience (Hurt) McHaney. The father was born in above mentioned State and county, in 1780, of Irish descent, a farmer by occupation. He came to Henderson County, Tenn., in 1833, being one of the early settlers, and was an extensive land owner, having 1.000 acres. He died August 19, 1842. The mother was of Scotch origin; born in Charlotte County, Vs., 1796, departed this life in July, 1836. Our subject was ten years old when his parents came to Tennessee; received his education in Lexington; at the age of seventeen he became salesman in a general store, working for Bradford at Cobb of Mifflin; remained with them one year, following two years clerked for his brother, W. C. and Isaac Lollor, in Lexington. In 1848, with his two brothers, W. C.and C. D., he established a store in Mifflin; at the end of four years sold his interests, and began farming; in 1885, with his brother, W. C., again engaged in merchandise, opening a store at Crucifer, where they met with great success. In 1876 W. C. sold his interest to La Fayette, who carried on the business two years, and since that time has devoted himself to agriculture and politics. He is an ardent and earnest Democrat, one of the strong and leading members of the party. In 1858 he was elected deputy sheriff of the county, serving until 1862; be was elected to the State Legislature in 1880, and two years later elected as joint representative from Madison and Henderson Counties, thus demonstrating the high regard in which he is held by his people. He was one of the committee on claim and agriculture interests. He is one of Henderson County's most able and enterprising men. He owns about 800 acres of valuable land and has a delightful home. In 1849 Mr. McHaney married a daughter of Felix and Caroline Henry, Miss Samantha L., a native of the county, born in 1829. She died in 1860, leaving two children Robert, and Ida, wife of Dr. J. T. Raines. In 1863 Mr. McHaney married Miss Minerva M. Jones, who was born in Madison County, in 1845. Their union has been blessed with four children: Caroline, Bessie May, William and Guy. Mr. and Mrs. McHaney are devoted members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

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S. A. Mynders

        Prof. S. A. Mynders, principal of the Lexington Academy, was born in Northfield, Minn., in 1861; son of A. and S. M. (Simmons) Mynders. The father was born in New York in 1827, and was a carriage manufacturer by trade. At the time of his marriage he was living in Troy, N. Y., where his wife was born in 1831. They moved to Minnesota in 1855; from there to Knoxville, Tenn., in 1866, where he died in 1882, and where his wife now resides. To their union, eight children were born, five of whom are still living, the fourth being our subject. He received a very thorough academic and collegiate education at the University of Tennessee, graduating in June, 1888, taking the degree of A. B. The same year he was elected professor of mathematics in the I. O. O. F. College, at Humboldt, Tenn. The following year he became president of that institution, remaining in the chair for three years. He has been Instructor in the State Normal Institutes of this State for the past three summers. In January, 1885, he was elected principal of the academy at Lexington, which position he now holds, giving universal satisfaction. He is recognized as one of the most able and proficient instructors, also one of the finest disciplinarians, in West Tennessee. He is a man of high moral character, having the esteem of patrons, pupils and faculty. He is a Democrat; a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of H., of Humboldt, and F. & A. M., Lexington, Tenn. In August, 1884, he married Miss Pobrecitta Richerson, who was born in Buenos Ayres. Argentine Republic, South America, in 1865, and is a daughter of Capt. Alfred and Bettie Richerson, of Humboldt, Tenn. Prof. and Mrs. Mynders have two interesting children Clarence and Hamon. Both parents are members of the Cumberlaud Presbyterian Church.

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Peter Pearson

        Hon. Peter Pearson, an old and respected citizen of the Eighth District, was born in Anson County, N.C. in 1814, a son of John and Penelope (Taylor) Pearson. The father was of French-Welsh descent. born in Perequimans County, N.C. In 1886 he immigrated to Henderson County, Tenn. where he died at the age of sixty-eight. His wife was of Irish descent, a native of Edgecombe County, N.C. She lived to the age of ninety years, was the mother of four children, only two of whom are living. Nathan, who is about two years older than Peter, Is also a resident of Henderson County. The subject of this sketch came to Tennessee about one year earlier than his father, and December 3, 1835, married a daughter of Scion and Hannah Prichard, Miss Mary, who was born in North Carolina and died January 26. 18641, at the age of forty-six years. She left seven children: James N., John D., Peter S., Jemima, wife of Dr. G. W. Laws, and Martha, wife of William Milam. In July, 1873, Mr. Pearson married, the second time, Harriet McMurray, born in Maury County, Tenn. Mr. Pearson is a stanch Democrat, an influential man in his party. Previous to the war he was magistrate for four years; In 1863 was elected on a general ticket as representative, and for three terms represented his people in a manner highly creditable and satisfactory. He is an old and honored member of the I O. O. F., head officer at the lodge at Wildervilie. Mr. Pearson commenced life as a poor man, and the property he accumulated was all destroyed during the war, but by industry, courage and judicious management he is now the possessor of a fine farm containing acres of valuable land, well cultivated, stocked and improved. He is a man of sound judgment, a good adviser, whose council is often sought. He is highly esteemed where-ever he is known.

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John Pearson

        John Pearson, a prosperous farmer and old resident of the Tenth District of Henderson County, was born in 1884, in Anson County, N.C., a son of Shadrach and Betsy (Cox) Pearson, both natives of North Carolina. The father was born about 1810, was a farmer by occupation. After his marriage he moved to Henderson County in 1836, locating in the Eighth District, and purchased a plantation containing about 200 acres of land. About 1848 he moved to Carroll County. where he resided until his death in 1875. The mother of John died about 1846. Mr. Pearson was twice married afterward, and the father of twenty-four children, eight of whom are now living, the subject of this sketch being among the eldest. He was but two years of age when his parents came to Tennessee, and went with them to Carroll County. In 1858 he married Miss Elizabeth Williams, who was born In Henderson County in 1888. To them one child was born, William Dudley. Mrs. Pearson died in 1864. Soon after his marriage Mr. Pearson returned to Henderson County and settled on his father's old place. In 1866 he united with Eveline Parker, of Carroll County. To this union seven children were born: Sidney A., Lou Emma, wife of John Jones; Kelvina B., Walter C., Priestly, Ethel and L. In 1870 Mr. Pearson bought 200 acres of fine land in the Tenth District, four miles north of Lexington, where he now resides, making altogether about 610 acres. In 1878 he erected a cotton-gin, and in 1886 another one. He gins on an average about 140 bales per year. He is one of the most successful and enterprising agriculturalists in the entire section, well known and universally liked, He is a stanch Democrat, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. in best standing.

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Stephen Powers

        Stephen Powers, one of the prosperous farmers of the Fourteenth District, was born in 1843 in Henderson County. He is the son of John S. and Elizabeth (Grice) Powers. The father was born in 1809, in Marion District, South Carolina. At the age of sixteen he came to Henderson County, and in 1880 married. Mrs. Powers departed this life in 1863. The following year he married Miss Nancy Moody, who died in 1885. In 1882 Mr. Powers located where he now resides. He is one of the oldest and best known men in the county. For the past ten years his eyesight has been very dim. He feels the disadvantage greatly. Of his fourteen children four only are living. Stephen Powers received his education in his native county, and resided under the paternal roof until the outbreak of the war. He enlisted August, 1862, in Company A, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, remaining in service until the surrender; was mustered out in 1883. He is a Republican; gave his first presidential vote for U.S. Grant. November, 1861, Mr. Powers married a native of his county, Miss Mary Ann Bartholomew, who was born in 1842. Of the eleven children who blessed their union nine are now living: John H., William K, Frank W., Andrew, Joel W., Adore A., Nancy L, Tennessee C. and Stephen L Mr. Powers moved to his present place of residence in 1866, owning 433 acres, which he was enabled .to purchase by his economy, industry and good management. He is a man of integrity, greatly respected by all who know him. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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Moses Segraves

        Moses Segraves, a well known farmer of the Ninth District, was born in Wilkes County, N.C., in 1832, the only child of Sherrod and Martha (Laws) Segraves. The father was born May 22, 1811, in Wako County, N.C. His parents died when he was a small child, and he was bound to James Jones. He married in his native State in 1833; he left his family, going to Davidson County. Tenn. where for some unknown reason he married a native of that county, Miss Margaret Neely, who was born in 1808. In 1842 he moved to Dyer County, where he has since resided. He has been very prosperous. The first wife, Miss Laws, was born in Wilkes County, N.C., in October, 1816; with her son came to Henderson County in 1845, settling in the Seventeenth District. The same year she married Benjamin Philips, by whom she had two children. Her death occurred February 26. 1872. Moses remained with his mother during his single life. August 22, 1852, he married Miss Susan P. Crabb, a native of Benton County, born October 29,1834. They have four children living: Mary H., wife of James D. Smith; John H., Nancy C., wife of Lea Smith, and Sidney J. In 1864 and 1865 Mr. Segraves made his home in Massac County, Ill. In 1806 he returned to Tennessee, purchased some property in the Ninth District where he has since resided. He is quite an extensive landholder, owning about 500 acres, which he was enabled to buy through his energy, ability and judicious management. He is a man of enterprise and Integrity and has the respect of all who know him. Politically he is conservative, voting from principles not for party. His first vote was cast for Fillmore in 1856. Mr. and Mrs. Segraves are exemplary members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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T. A. Smith

        Maj. T. A. Smith, register of Henderson County, was born in Randolph County. N.C., July 6, 1817. He was the oldest son of Benjamin and Easter (Argo) Smith. The father was of Dutch origin, born in Richland County, S.C., in 1790; was married in North Carolina to a native of that State, who was born in Anson County in 1792 and died in 1861. Benjamin came to Tennessee in 1827, located in the Sixth District of Henderson County, where he purchased some property and engaged in agricultural pursuits. The last twenty years of his life were spent in the Eleventh District. His death occurred in the same year as that of his wife, 1861. They had a family of four sons and four daughters. The subject of this sketch was about ten years old when his parents came to Tennessee. He remained with them until his twenty-ninth year and for seven years kept "bachelor's hall." March 3, 1858, he married Miss Mary J. Campbell, who was born in Henderson County in 1841. They have seven children living: Mary E., wife of John White; Thomas B., Grant. Jennie O., Elizabeth, Lettie May and James H. When the war between the North and South was declared, Mr. Smith became one of the "boys in blue." He organized for the United States Army, Company A, Seventh Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, and was elected captain of the company serving two months in that capacity, after which he was promoted to rank of major for his brave and meritorious conduct. He was twice captured, the first time at Trenton, and taken to Camp Chase, Ohio, where he was very sick and consequently sent home. He was captured the second time at Union City, and taken to several different prisons in the South, being retained about nine months, being paroled December, 1864, and mustered out at Washington, D.C., the winter of 1865. He is a stanch Republican and one of the leading and influential men of that party. From 1840 to 1848 was constable of the Eleventh District; was elected magistrate in 1849, serving two years; was census taker in 1870, for the county. In 1884 he was elected county register, and again called to the same office two years later, holding the position at the present time. He has been a faithful and conscientious public servant for many years, always giving satisfaction. The greatest portion of his life has been spent in Henderson County where he has won the esteem of the people. Since 1878 he has resided in the Tenth District, owning 464 acres of valuable land.

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John A. Smith

John A. Smith, a prominent farmer and old resident of the Sixth District, was born March 6. 1819, in Randolph County, N.C., the second child of a family of four sons and four daughters born to Benjamin and Easter (Argo) Smith. The father was of Dutch origin, born 1790, in Richland County, S.C.; when an infant was taken to North Carolina where he remained several years and was married; in 1827 immigrated to Henderson County In the Sixth District, bought some property and carried on farming. The last twenty years of his life were spent in the Eleventh District. He died in 1861. His wife was born in Anson County, N.C., in 1792; departed this life the same year as her husband, 1861. John A. was but eight years of age when his parents came to Tennessee. He remained with them until twenty two years of age. March .4, 1841, he married a daughter of C. and Mary Robertson, Miss Mary Ann, who was born in Halifax County, Va., in 1825. To them eleven children were born: James F., William T., Joseph N., Zachariah T., Benjamin O., John P., George W., Mary C., Martha J., Christopher C. and Nancy A. After marriage, Mr. Smith bought 200 acres of land in the Eleventh District, and gave his attention to agricultural pursuits. In 1865 he purchased 700 acres in the Sixth District and settled where he has since resided. He has given 200 acres to his sons, and still has a fine tract left. Re has always been an enterprising and successful farmer, and a worthy, respected citizen. He is a Republican; gave his first vote for Harrison in 1840. Mr. and Mrs. Smith and five children are exemplary members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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L. A. Stanford

        L. A. Stanford, a well known and respected farmer of Lexington, was born in Henderson County, in 1837; he is the eighth and only living child of a family of nine born to Thomas and Clarissia (Ross) Stanford. The father was born in Greenville District, South Carolina, in 1797; he married a native of same State and district, who was born in 1801, and in 1834 immigrated to Henderson County, in the Ninth District; after living there two years moved to the Seventeenth District, purchased a plantation, and followed agricultural pursuits. He died In Lexington in 1880, at the advanced age of eighty-three years, an old settler, a prosperous and esteemed man. The mother is still living, making her home with L. A., who was raised and educated In his native county. At an early age he began farming, since which time he has continued the same business, having met with great success, and now owns 800 acres of valuable land; in 1882 he established a cotton-gin in Lexington in connection with his farming interests, and gins on an average 100 bales of cotton per year. When the late civil war broke out he was among the first to serve his country; in 1861 enlisted in the Confederate Army, Company H, Twenty-seventh Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and did gallant service at the battle of Shiloh, also in other engagements and skirmishes of less note, remaining in the army over twelve months. April, 1883, he married Miss Margaret Whyte, of Henderson County, who was born In 1843, a daughter of Joseph and Mary Whyte. To their union several children were born. Thomas, Lizzie, Lemuel, George W., Arcadius, James, Ruby and Johnnie. In 1873 Mr. Stanford was elected town marshal, and served about seven years; in 1879-80 was constable of the Tenth District. He is a life-long Democrat, casting his first vote for John C. Breckenridge. Mr. Stanford is one of the solid, enterprising and best known men in the county; his wife is a consistent member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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T. M. Stubblefield

        T. M. Stubblefield, an old and well known resident of the Fourth District, was born in 1813, in Wilkes County, Ga.; is one of the two living children of a family of ten born to Peter and Sallie (Harris) Stubblefield. The father was born in Virginia in 1727; he left the "Old Dominion" when quite a young man, moving to Georgia, where he remained until after his marriage in 1824; came to Tennessee, locating in Maury County; in 1835 went to Wayne County, where the remainder of his life was spent; his death occurred in 1839; his wife was born in Wilkes County, Ga., in 1786 and died in 1880. The subject of this sketch was raised at home, receiving his education in his native county, being about ten years of age when his parents came to Tennessee. August, 1835, he married Miss Sarah Lipscomb, daughter of John and Judith Lipscomb; she (Mrs. Stubblefleld) was born in Maury County in 1812, and became the mother of ten children: Sarah B, wife of R. J. Dyer; Amanda C., wife of C. G. Hardeman: Bevelry M., Charles H., Martha J., widow of Augusta Helms; Mary B., wife of M. A. Maines; Margaret E., wife of L. D. Horton; Wm. F., Nancy N., wife of Charles A. Helms, and Thomas F. The year after marriage Mr. Stubblefield moved to Wayne County, and in 1844 came to Henderson County; located in the Fourth District. where he purchased 122 acres, mostly dense woods his nearest neighbor being three-quarters of a mile distant; He has been a hard working, industrious man: by good management and perseverance, has added acre to acre, until he is now the possessor of about 1,000 acres. He has a fine farm, operated on the modern plan, cultivating and fertilizing according to the latest improvements. In 1885 Mr. and Mrs. Stubblefield celebrated their golden wedding, a pleasure but rarely enjoyed. Previous to the war, Mr. Stubblefield was a Whig, since that time has been a Democrat, casting his first vote for Hugh L. White in 1836. In 1874 he was elected county surveyor of Henderson County, and served four years. He is a Mason, belongs to Lodge No. 441, at Mills Springs; he is a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and his wife of the Cumberland Presbyterian.

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John M. Taylor

        Hon. John M: Taylor, one of Henderson County's most gifted and popular sons, and congressman of the Eighth Congressional District, was born May 18. 1830, a son of Jesse and Mary (May) Taylor. The father was born in Virginia in 1790, was of English-Irish extraction; when quite a small boy, with his mother, left his native State and moved near Lancaster, Ky. In after years he was cashier of a bank in Shelbyville, Bedford Co., Tenn. At the time of his marriage he was living in Madison County; in 1834 became a resident of Henderson County; the following year was appointed by the court as clerk of the county court, and afterward elected by the people to the same position, which he retained until 1859. His death occurred in 1880, and the county lost one of its worthiest and most esteemed men. Mr. Taylor was twice married; the first time to Miss Lyda Williams, by whom he had four children, all living; the second union was with Miss Mary May, by whom there are two children living, one of whom is the subject of this sketch. The latter was educated in the academy at Lexington and Union University of Murfreesborn; in 1858 he began the study of law, reading with Maj. A. O. Shrewsbery, of Lexington, later attending the law department of the Cumberland University, at Lebanon, Tenn., where he graduated with honor in 1800. Upon his return home he began the practice of his chosen profession, which received an interruption in a short time by the outbreak of the civil war. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, Seventy-seventh Regiment. Tennessee Infantry, and assisting in its organization, was elected first lieutenant. He took active part in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Franklin and Nashville. His thigh bone was broken by a ball, the wound being so severe that he was disabled for a year, during which time he was in the hospital at Harrisburg, Ky. He was taken prisoner at Danville, Ky., and carried to Camp Chase, Ohio; after his release he joined his company at Dalton, Ga., and was immediately elected captain at the reorganization of the company. After the battle of Shiloh he was promoted to the rank of major for his undaunted and gallant service. After the restoration of peace he returned home and resumed the practice of law, meeting with marked success. In 1884 he married Miss Amanda McHaney, an estimable lady of Henderson County, born in 1845, a daughter of W. C. McHaney, one of the best known and most respected residents of the section. Maj. and Mrs. Taylor have three children living: Mary Lou, William and Daisy A. Mrs. Taylor is a true Christian woman and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In 1869 Capt. Taylor was elected mayor of Lexington, serving one year; the same year was made a delegate to the Constitutional Convention, which held its meeting in 1870; the August of 1870 became attorney-general of the Eleventh Judicial District, which place he held for eight years, winning many laurels and much renown. In 1880 was a delegate to the National Convention at Cincinnati; the same year was elected to the Legislature to fill the unexpired term of Dr. Murray; in 1882 was elected congressman of the Eighth Congressional District. receiving a plurality of 2,820 his opponent was S. C. Hawkins. Capt. Taylor was one of the committee on postoffice, post-roads and expenditure in the war department; in 1884 was re-elected and was chairman of the naval department, also one of a committee of five who prepared the appropriations on postal service. He is a Mason, belonging to Lodge No. 64 (a Council Mason); a member of the K. of H., at Jackson; of I. O. O. F., at Lexington, and has taken all of the degrees of that order; and is also one of the A. O. U. W. Mr. Taylor is a man of brilliancy, high mental and moral standing, who has always had the Interests of his county and people at heart.

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J. A. Teague

        J. A. Teague, clerk of the county court, was born in Henderson County in 1843, a son of J. W. and Alice (Fuller) Teague. The father was of Scotch-Irish origin, born in 1818 in Chatham County, N.C. In 1825 he with his father, Isaac Teague, immigrated to Middle Tennessee, locating in Warren County, where he remained two years; in 1827 settled in the Seventh District of Henderson County and purchased a plantation and turned his attention to agriculture. J. W. was about fourteen years of age when he came to Tennessee, where he resided at the time of his marriage. He settled in the Tenth District where he lived until 1883 when he returned to the Seventh District. His death occurred in 1885 at the ripe age of seventy-two. The mother was born in Henderson County in 1819. She raised a family of five children; all are now living, our subject being the second; his educational advantages were limited, having attended school only about five months. When hostilities broke out between the North and South, he enlisted in the United States Army, August, 1862, in the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry. He participated in many skirmishes. At Union City, Tenn., he was captured and taken prisoner to Andersonville, afterward to Florence and thence to Charleston; after being retained eleven months he made his escape. February, 1865; made his way to the Federal lines, remaining with them until the surrender, reaching home August. 1865. In 1866 he formed a partnership with L. A. Teague, establishing a large grocery, thus continuing for three years. He was sole proprietor until 1878, in that year was elected circuit court clerk by a majority of 522, showing to a considerable extent his popularity. He has always been a Republican one of the leading members of that party. For nineteen years he has been a Master Mason, belongs to Blue Lodge No. 64, Chapter 37; he is a K. of H., Lodge No. 189, and a member of A. O. U. W., Lodge No. 32. October 7, 1868, he married Miss N. L. Bird of Lexington, born in 1851 and is a daughter of W. R. Bird. Mr. and Mrs. Teague have an interesting family of six children: James J., Arthur, Hattie, Ernest E., Wm. H. and Birdie. Mrs. Teague is an estimable lady and an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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E. J. Timberlake

        E. J. Timberlake, a prominent farmer of the Seventeenth District, was born in Henderson County in 1845; was one of a family of five children born to Richard and Tabitha (Trice) Timberlake. The father was of Scotch origin, born in Franklin County, N.C., in 1788, and moved to Henderson County in 1826, settling in the Tenth District, three miles north of Lexington. He was twice married and the father of eleven children. His first wife was Mary Neal; the second wife, and mother of E. J., was born in Orange County, N.C., in 1802, and departed this life in 1875. Mr. Timberlake was one of the oldest settlers and substantial men of the county, where he was generally known. At the time of his death, which occurred in 1860, he was the possessor of about 2,000 acres of valuable land. Our subject received a liberal education in the schools of his native county, attending the University of North Carolina during 1859 and 1860. He taught school several months during the war; in 1862 married Miss Louisa H. Small, who was born in Henderson County in 1844, a daughter of Alex Small. They have seven children: Eddie, wife of John E. McCall; Louanna; Edward; Richard; Charles; Jessie and Kato. Mrs. Timberlake is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In 1863 Mr.Timberlake located on a 200-acre tract of land given him by his father, which is situated four and a half miles from Lexington; with the exception of seven years spent in town he has lived on the place since the year after his marriage. He is one of the leading Democrats of the County, he was elected circuit court clerk in 1870 and in 1874 was a member of the Thirty-ninth Legislature. He is a K. of H., belonging to Stonewall Lodge, No. 199, of Jackson; is also a member of the A. O. U. W. Mr. Timberlake is an extensive landholder, a prosperous farmer and worthy citizen.

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William H. Warren

        Dr. William H. Warren, an old and respected physician of Lexington, was born in 1812, in Chesterfield County, Va. The father, Robert Warren, was born in Virginia in 1782, of English descent, a collier by occupation; most of his life was spent in his native State; he served gallantly in the war of 1812, and died in 1834. His wife, Catherine Vivian, was a Virginian of French descent; was the mother of four children, all of whom lived to maturity. She died in the year 1851. William H. was the only son. He was reared in, and received his literary education in, his native State; at about the age of seventeen he began the study of medicine under the tuition of Dr. Barrand of Norfolk, Va. In 1834 he graduated at the medical college at Philadelphia, Penn.; returning home entered, upon the practice of his profession; in 1837 he came to Tennessee, locating at Lexington; the following year he resumed his practice, where he has met with extraordinary success, and is recognized as the leading surgeon and physician of Henderson County. For the past fifteen years the Doctor has, to some extent, suspended his active practices and devoted his time to his business and the entertainment of his friends, who are numerous, for no man has more completely won the confidence and esteem of the community. In 1841 he married Miss Adaline A. Harmon who, was born in 1820, and one of the first white female children born in Henderson County. She was a daughter of John Harmon, one of the first white settlers who came to the county in 1819, was born in 1779 and died in 1851. His wife, Elizabeth Harmon, was, born in 1786, and departed this life in 1865. Mrs. Warren is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The Doctor is a Democrat, was a Whig previous to the war, and his first vote was cast for Hugh L White in 1836.

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O. P. White

        O. P. White, a farmer and influential resident of the Second District, was born in Henderson County in 1825, k son of Stephen Finney and Hannah (Dixon) White. The father was of Irish origin, born in South Carolina in 1781; when a youth he immigrated to the portion of Rutherford County now called Cannon County, Middle Tenn., and remained there until after his marriage. In 1824 he came to Henderson County, settling in the Second District; in 1830 he moved to the Seventh District, where he resided until the time of his death in 1858. He was one of the pioneers of the county, where he was well known and respected. His wife was born in North Carolina in 1792, and departed this life ten years later than her husband. Of the nine children born to them, four only are living: Louisa was born in Rutherford County in 1817, Lucinda was born in the same county in 1822, Bennett G. is a native of Henderson County born in 1827, and our subject. Since 1860 the four have been living together, leading harmonious and peaceful lives, devoted to each other; none of them have ever been married. The sisters are devout members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Bennett G. was one of the gallant boys in gray, he enlisted in March, 1862, in Tenth Texas Battery; was in numerous severe skirmishes and engagements, and remained in active service until the surrender. The two brothers are Republicans, each voting the first time in 1848 for Gen. Taylor. They own about 217 acres of valuable land, are industrious, honorable men, having the confidence and esteem of the entire community.

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E. G. Whitehead

        Dr. E. G. Whitehead, an eminent and skillful physician and surgeon, of Moore's Hill, was born in Haywood County, Tenn., March 1, 1840, a son of Richard and Lucinda (Gordon) Whitehead. The father was of Irish origin, born in 1801, in North Carolina. When a young man he immigrated to Sumner County, Tenn., and at an early date moved to Haywood County, where he bought a large tract of land and engaged in agricultural pursuits. His death occurred in 1867. The mother was of Scotch descent, born in Louisiana, in 1806. Of the nine children whom she bore, seven lived to reach maturity; she died in 1868. The subject of this sketch was the youngest of the family. He received his literary education at Brownsville, Redland, Miss. and elsewhere. At the age of twenty-two he began the study of medicine; soon afterward engaged in teaching school, which he continued for several years, devoting his vacations and leisure time to the study of medicine. In 1874 he located at Moore's Hill and entered into the practice of his profession; in 1877 he graduated as an M.D. at the medical department of the University of Nashville. August 27, 1877, he married a daughter of J. D. and Margaret Evans, Miss Vina, who was born in Henderson County in 1860. They have four children living: Ella E., Lola, Lula and Richard. Mrs. Whitehead is a consistent member of the Missionary Baptist Church and a true Christian woman. The Doctor has succeeded in building up an extensive and lucrative practice; he is one of the most popular physicians in the district. He is esteemed and highly regarded both in professional and private life. In 1880 he erected a pretty house of modern style and has continued to add to its improvement since that time. The Doctor is a stanch Democrat.

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Richard Williams

        Richard Williams, a well-to-do and highly respected farmer of the Eighteenth District, was born May 5, 18443, In Decatur County, Tenn. He was the second of a family of twelve children born to Kerney C. and Teressa (Taylor) Williams. The father was been in 1816, in Chatham County, N.C. When a youth he immigrated to Decatur County, West Tenn., where he lived at the time of his marriage with Miss Taylor, who was a native of the county, born in 1828; she departed this life September 1. 1877. In 1855 Mr. Williams moved to Carroll County and in 1884 came to Henderson County, locating in the Eighteenth District, where he purchased some valuable property and resided until his death, February 11, 1886. He was married a second time, the result of the union being one child. The subject of this sketch came to this county when about eighteen years of age, and remained with his parents until about twenty-four. May 10, 1871, he married Miss Elizabeth Morris, a native of the county, born in 1851, who bore him one child, Gecovy. Mrs. Williams died October 15, 1873. Mr. Williams then united in marriage, March 4, 1876, with Miss Frances Frizzell, of Decatur County, born in 1854. They have one child living, Charles. Mr. Williams has lived in the district many years. In 1874 he bought 200 acres of good land, where he now resides. He commenced life a poor man, but by his industry and good management, has accumulated considerable property, owning altogether about 400 acres. He is an enterprising and flourishing farmer, a worthy and esteemed citizen. He is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Seymour and Blair. He is also a Mason of good standing, belongs to Lodge No. 509. Mr. and Mrs. Williams are both members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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J. T. Wilson

        J. T. Wilson, an enterprising farmer of the Seventh District, was born in Rockingham County, N.C., in 1829, the fourth of a family of nine children born-to J. B. and Souls (Coffey) Wilson. The father was of Irish descent; born In 1798 in the State of North Carolina, where he married a native, born in 1800; they came to Henderson County in 1832, settling in the Eighth District and buying a home. Mrs. Wilson died in 1846. Mr. Wilson's second marriage was with Miss Mary Pugh. His death occurred in 1878. The subject of this sketch was about three years of age when his parents came to Tennessee; he made his home with them until after attaining his majority. In 1866 he married Miss E. M. Barger, who was born in East Tennessee in 1848. They have seven children living Sallie, Theodore, Margaret, Emma, Lizzie, Henry Arzo and Lular. At the time of his marriage Mr. Wilson was residing in Carroll County. He moved to Henderson County and bought 269 acres in the Eighth District; in 1886 he located at present place of residence, five miles west of Lexington, where he owns 330 acres of fine land. Mr. Wilson is an energetic, prosperous farmer, a good neighbor, and one of the best known and respected residents in the section. He is a Republican gave his first vote for Gen. Scott in 1853. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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Levi S. Woods

        Hon. Levi S. Woods, circuit judge of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit, was born in Carroll County, Tenn., November 17, 1848, a son of Levi S. and Arantha Jane (Dinwiddie) Woods. The father was a native of Madison County, Tennessee. His father, John Woods, was a Virginian, and in 1782, with a party of men from his native State, set out to seek a new home in Kentucky. Daniel Boone was one of their number on their way they were suddenly attacked by Indians. Sixty of the Virginians were killed. The remainder of the party continued their journey and settled in the West. About 1800 John immigrated to Williamson County, Tenn., and in 1819 came to Henderson County, being one of the very first white men who located in the county. Levi B., Sr., settled in Carroll County, where he was married; he was an agriculturist, an honored and esteemed man and departed this life in 1857. His wife was born in Virginia in 1811, a descendant of Robert Dinwiddie, who was governor of Virginia in 1758. Mrs. Woods was the mother of thirteen children; her death occurred in 1853. Our subject was the twelfth child; his academic education was received at Trenton and Jackson; at the age of twenty he began to study law under instructions of Hon. L. M. Jones and Judge Cathel, of Trenton. He attended the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn., in 1869 and 1870, and in the latter year located in Lexington, entering upon the practice of his profession, displaying at once his superior qualities, end being soon in the front ranks of the Lexington bar. He is an eloquent orator, a clear and logical speaker. In 1873 was elected by the county court as superintendent of the county schools and served three years. During Judge Bateman's term Mr. Woods was several times appointed special judge. August, 1880. he was elected to his present position by a majority of more than 1,500 his opponent being the able Judge T. C. Muse, of Jackson. Judge Woods is a Council Mason; also belongs to I. O. O. F., Encampment Lodge. November 3, 1873, he was married to a daughter of W. C. and Louisa McHaney. Mrs. Woods was born in Henderson County in 1849; bas been the mother of four children, only one is now living, Georgia A. Two died in infancy, and Myrtle at the interesting age of four years.

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