TNGenWeb Project
The Goodspeed Publishing Co., History of Tennessee
1887

Pages 1239-1252

Greene County Biographical Sketches
Surnames A thru L

Transcribed by Kris L. Martin

       J. C. Ayres, farmer, was born near Warrensburg, Tenn., April 16, 1830, the son of Samuel O. and Hannah (Bewley) Ayres, the former born on the James River, in Virginia, and serving in the war of 1812, and on the lakes at the last of the war, whence, in returning to his home in Alabama, he was led to locate in Greene County, where he became a most successful farmer. The mother, a daughter of Anthony Bewley was born in Washington County; the father was a Baptist and the mother a Methodist. Our subject left the farm and school and, in 1862, joined the (Confederate) Thirty-first Tennessee Infantry, and after the fall of Vicksburg, was paroled and returned home, but six months later went to Knoxville, and remained within the Federal lines until the close, yet did not enlist. He has farmed ever since the war, and now owns a fine farm of 245 acres, divided, into two farms really. For twenty years he traded extensively in stock, but has now abandoned it almost. He donated a lot for the Masonic Hall and public school. at Warrensburgh, and also the lot for Mary’s Chapel Methodist Church there. December 28, 1871, he married Mary D., a daughter of Daniel Jones, of Cocke County. In 1845, her birth occurred. Their children are Daniel, born February 13, 1873; Samuel C., born September 15, 1875; Thomas D., born April 10, 1878; Nancy J., born September 27, 1880; and Mary D., born April 18, 1883, and died the same day. He and his wife are Methodists.

       Marion L. Bailey, a farmer of the Eleventh District, was born in 1827, in Greene County, where he has since resided. He began life for himself when twenty-one years old, in only moderate circumstances, and the most of what he is now worth is the fruit of his own industry and good management. He owns a farm of 200 acres. He was married December 9,1847, to Miss Sarah H. Williams, a daughter of Rev. Benjamin and Nancy Williams, natives of Pennsylvania and Greene Counties, Tenn., respectively. Nine children have blessed their union: Alexander H., Elizabeth A., Nancy P., Thomas M., Henrietta M., John M., Caroline M., Joseph B. and Lyvia S. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which Mr. Bailey is a local minister. Mr. Bailey is a Republican in politics. He is the eldest of nine children born to Thomas and Henrietta (Keel) Bailey, natives of Greene and Jefferson (now Hamblen) Counties, respectively. Mrs. Bailey was a daughter of William and Lyvia A. Reel. Thomas Bailey was a son of Thomas and Elizabeth Bailey, natives of Londondery, Ireland, and North Carolina, respectively. Thomas Bailey, Sr., immigrated to America, about 1775, with his brother, Cloud Bailey, who went to Middle Tennessee, and raised a family, and died there. Thomas Bailey, Sr., settled in East Tennessee, where he lived and died.

       G. N. Bailey, M. D., was born October 9, 1831, in Greene County, where he has since resided. He received an academical education, and read medicine with Dr. J. R. Young He began practice, and since 1860 has been at his present location, with marked success, professionally and financially. He owns a fine home. In September, 1854, he married Sarah, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah McAmis, of this county, and of Irish descent. Their children are James A., Thomas Y., Rufus K., Martha I., Ella C., B. K., G. N., Mary H., Benson M. and John V. He is a Methodist, and his wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a Republican. He is the fourth of nine children of Thomas and Henrietta (Keel) Bailey, natives of Hamblen County, the former a justice for about eighteen years, and an excellent farmer. Thomas Bailey, of Ireland, was the next ancestor. He moved to near Chapel Hill, N. C., and entered land in our subject’s locality about 1775.

       George A. Bailey, merchant, farmer and stock dealer, was born July 4, 1846, on his present farm. When eighteen he began for himself, and now owns 280 acres, besides other lands, and a stock of goods. November 8, 1866, he married Mary A., a daughter of William and Eliza (Armitage) Reed, natives of Greene County. Their children were Ninnie L., Willie R., Thomas K. (deceased), Florence B., Alexander H., Martha H. (deceased) and Carrie E. (twins), John M., Bessie M., Lura L. and George B. Both are Methodists, and he is a Republican, and a Master Mason. He is the youngest of nine children of Thomas and Henrietta Bailey, the former a justice for many years. For a sketch of the parents see above.

       Christian Bible, a farmer in the Eighth District, was born in 1821 in the locality where he has since resided. He began life for himself in quite limited circumstances, and the property he now owns is the result of his own industry and good management. He owns upward of 800 acres where he resides. He was married February 6 1842, to Miss Louisa Tucker, a daughter of Abraham Tucker, a native of Washington County. Seven children have blessed this union: Mary E., now Mrs. Mysinger; Noah L., deceased; Martha E., now Mrs. Myers; Lydia, now Mrs. Harmon; Louisa J., deceased; Surrena E., now Mrs. Kinser, and Nathan H. Mr. and Mrs. Bible are members of the Lutheran Church, and Mr. Bible is a Republican and was a stanch Uri ion man. He is a member of the G. A. R. He is the ninth of eleven children of Adam and Elizabeth (Neas) Bible. Adam Bible and wife were of German descent. He was a very successful farmer, and was a son of Christian Bible, one of the earliest settlers of Greene County, Tenn. Christian Bible, Jr., our subject, enlisted in 1863 in Company F, Fourth Tennessee Infantry, of the Federal Army, and served until the close of the war. He had one son, Noah L., in the Union Army, who died at Nashville while in the service.

       Capt. John O. Bible, a prominent farmer, was born in Greene County, on his present farm, March 21, 1840, the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Wilson) Bible, the former born in 1797. Philip, the next ancestor, was born in Virginia, September 5, 1763,’ and came to Tennessee October 17, 1791, settling on the Little Chucky. The father was a prominent farmer, and a hold Unionist. He died in July, 1861, a member of the Presbyterian Church. The mother, born near Greeneville, March 27, 1798, was the daughter of John Wilson, a Greene County farmer. She was a Presbyterian also, and died March 7, 1867. Our subject grew up with rural advantages, and on June 11, 1868, joined Company A, Fifth Federal Tennessee Cavalry, afterward the Eighth Tennessee Cavalry, of which he became sergeant, and afterward second lieutenant. About March 20,1865, he was made captain of Company G, and was engaged in the second siege of Knoxville, at Morristown, Bull’s Gap, Blountville, Salt Works, Va., Salisbury, N. C., Morgantown, N. C., Marion, Va., and numerous skirmishes. On September 20, 1865, he was mustered out at Knoxville. He h as since been farming, is Dow owner of about 450 acres in Chucky Valley, and has always declined the solicitations of public offices. On November 14,1866, he married Eleanor, a daughter of Samuel Steele, one of the most prominent farmers of Chucky Valley. She was born in Greene County, May 16, 1841. Their children are Alvin, born December 21, 1868; Flora, born May 31, 1871; Edgar, born April 3, 1873; Jesse, born October 15, 1877; Hubert, born November 26, 1879, and Murphy, born June 8, 1883. Both are Presbyterians.

       Capt. Thomas Bible. The ancestor, Christian Bible, of German descent, was born in Rockingham County, Va. He immigrated to Tennessee, was a pioneer of Greene County, and settled in Little Chucky Valley. His son, John Bible, the grandfather of our subject, was born in Virginia, in 1776, and came to Tennessee with his father, and was a second lieutenant, in Capt. Jones’ Company, in the war of 1812; and he was highly esteemed until his death. Christian Bible, Jr., (the father of our subject, and the son of John), was born on Little Chucky, March 13, 1804; he grew up in the country, is a successful farmer, and aged eighty- three years. In 1826 he married Mary, a daughter of Christian Bowers, a native of Virginia. She was born in 1805, and died in 1869; was a member of the Lutheran Church, was a faithful wife, and a devoted mother. Of the six children, our subject is the youngest, and was born on Little Chucky, April 26, 1840. He was reared a farmer, among rural advantages. From boyhood lie was a bitter opponent to slavery, and State rights, devoted to the union of States, the flag and our free institutions. At the age of twenty-two years he scouted through the Confederate lines to Kentucky, and on December 1, 1862, joined Company C, Eighth Tennessee Infantry, United States Army; he was mustered as second sergeant, May la, 1863; appointed and commissioned captain, December 3, 1863, by Andrew Johnson, military governor, of’ Tennessee, and served in that capacity until the close of the war, and was present and took part in the following noted battles: Siege of Knoxville, Tenn., Buzzard Roost Mountain, Resaca (May 14, 1864), Burnt Hickory, Kenesaw Mountain, and at the taking of Atlanta, Ga., at Columbia, Franklin (November 30, 1864), Nashville, Tenn. (December 15 and 16, 1864), and at the surrender of Gen. Joseph Johnston, at Greensboro, N. C., April 26, 1865. He. was mustered out June 80, 1865. He served as deputy sheriff, in Greene County, in 1867-68, and was elected from said county, to a seat in the Forty-third General Assembly of Tennessee, in 1882, and served, with satisfaction. In 1884 he declined re-election, and has been devoted to farming ever since, on the old homestead, on Little Chucky, Greene County. On October 26, 1876, he married Martha J., a daughter of Jonathan H. Easterly, of Greene County. She was born April 22, 1841, and is a member of the Lutheran Church. Their children are Edwin A., born May 18, 1878, and Zulu Z., born December 26, 1879.

       W. C. Black, farmer, was born in Botetourt County, Va., April 19, 1826, the son of Christopher and Nancy (Good) Black, the former a native of Maryland, a carpenter, and a soldier of the war of 1812. The mother was born in Maryland, and has had six sons and four daughters. Our subject, the youngest, was reared on a farm and educated in the county schools of Roanoke County, Va. When he reached his majority he worked nine years in the wollen mills at Bousack’s, Va. He then worked at the carpenter’s trade until recently, and has followed farming for the last fourteen years. Since 1860 he has lived at his present home. In 1855 he married Barbara Bair, of Virginia. Of their three sons and seven daughters, two of the former and five of the latter are living. Our subject is a Methodist, and is Postmaster at Fullen’s. He is also a justice, and is a man who has become prosperous in spite of obstacles.

       John R. Boyd, M. D., was born in Jonesboro, Tenn., in 1850, and is the son of Jeremiah andMary M. (Fitzimmons) Boyd, both of whom were natives of Virginia. Jeremiah came to Tennessee when a young man, and located at Jonesboro, Washington County, where he followed the cabinet maker’s trade all his life, and is at present a citizen of that place. The mother died in 1885. The subject of this sketch was reared in Jonesboro, Tenn., and attended Martin Academy at that place, and at the Kingston schools. After finishing school he learned the cabinet maker’s trade under his father, and worked at the same for a period of seven years, and then read medicine at Jonesboro under Dr. Wheeler. He attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Baltimore, Md., from which he graduated in 1870. He then practiced his profession at Jonesboro for about a year, and his health failing him lie next removed to the country. In the spring of 1874 he removed to Greenville, and began practicing, and has continued uninterruptedly up to the present. He is one of the most skilled surgeons in this section of the country, and as such stands at the head of his profession in Greene County, while as a physician of learning and experience he ranks with the leading ones of the country, having a large and increasing practice. In the fall of 1882 he formed a co-partnership with W. C. Brown, and engaged in the drug business at Greeneville, under the firm name of Boyd & Brown. In March, 1887, Mr. Brown retired from the firm, his successor being John Parks and under the firm name of Boyd & Park the business is now Conducted. This firm’s, establishment is one of the most complete drug houses to be found in the State outside of the large cities. A complete line of drugs and fancy goods is carried, and a prescription department is also conducted, being in charge of an able and competent prescriptionist. A large and beautiful mineral water fountain forms quite a summer feature of the establishment, and a line of fine cigars is also carried. Our subject was united in marriage in the fall of 1872 to Ellen Byrd, who was born in Washington County, Tenn., in 1861, and is the daughter of Amos Byrd. To this union five children have been born.

       James H. Bright, a merchant and farmer of the Sixteenth District, wasborn in 1826, at Abingdon, Va.,and when small was brought by his parents to his present location. Wheri twenty-two years old he began life for himself, a poor man, and what he is now worth is the fruit of his own industry and good management. He has followed farming, merchandising and dealing in fine stock; in the latter he dealt very extensively, and was eminently successful. He has driven as many as 850 cattle through to Virginia Markets in one drove, and has shipped as many as 1,900 in one fall season. He owns a good farm of 298 acres, and has given considerable property to his children. He enlisted in 1863, in Capt. Dodd’s Company, Eighty-first Tennessee Cavalry, C. S. A., and altogether served one year’s time. He was married in 1848, to Miss Nancy McMackin, a daughter of James McMackin, a native of Washington County. One child was born to this union, and died unnamed. Mrs. Bright died in January, MO. He was married a second time, in the fall of 1850, to Miss Matilda Tedlock, a daughter of John Tedlock, a native of Washington County. Seven children blessed their union: Sarah J., Mary E. (deceased), George W., William D., Jacob A.. John C. Breckinridge (deceased) and James Houston (deceased). Mr. and Mrs. Bright are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Bright is a Democrat in politics, casting his first presidential vote for the Democratic candidate in 1848. He is the first-born of twins of David and Sallie (Morelock) Bright, natives of Virginia and Greene County, respectively. Mr. Bright came to this locality when a boy. He was colonel of the State militia. Mr. and Mrs. Bright were of German descent. He was a very successful farmer all his life. He was a son of Michael and Louisa Bright, natives of Reading, Penn. He was magistrate for many years. He immigrated to Greene County, Tenn., about 1800. Mrs. Sallie Bright died, and Mr. David Bright then married Lydia Collier, by which union ten children were born.

       Col. A. J. Brown, the subject of this sketch, is a native of Washington County, Tenn., and born at Jonesboro December 16, 1834, and is the son of Eunich and Anna Rebecca (McMahan) Brown. The father was a native of Washington County, Tenn., born May 10, 1810, and died September 15, 1879. He was reared as a farmer, which together with teaming farmed for the greater work of his life. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in Company I, Eighth Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry, was made second lieutenant of his company, and served throughout the war. At the close of the war be returned to Washington, Tenn., where he farmed until his death in 1879. The mother of our subject was born in Baltimore, Md., and was married twice. Her first husband was Isaac George, of Baltimore, who died in East Tennessee. Unto this first marriage were born three children. Her second husband was the father of our subject, and unto her second marriage were born three children-two sisters and a brother. Our subject is this brother, was reared in Jonesboro, and was educated in Jonesboro Academy and Washington College. After his literary education was completed he began the study of law, under Chief Justice J. W. Deaderick, of Jonesboro, and was admitted to the bar in 1858. He commenced the practice of his profession in the same year, and continued up to the breaking out of the civil war. In 1863 he entered the Federal Army, and became lieutenant-colonel of the Eighth Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry; he resigned in May, 1865, returned to Jonesboro, Tenn., and resumed the practice of law, which he continued until 1886, when he was elected judge of the first judicial circuit of Tennessee. In 1880 he was elected to the State Senate, and served one term. On September 25, 1862, he was united in marriage with Miss Agnes M. Wilds, daughter of John A. Wilds, and to this union have been born six sons and four daughters. Our subject is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and has been ruling /elder for several years. He is a Master Mason, a Knight of Honor, and a member of the G. A. R. He is a self-made man. His father was a poor man, and our subject had no advantages of money to educate himself, but earned the money that defrayed the expenses of his education.

       James L. Cain, one of the largest and most prominent farmers of the Fourth Civil District of Greene County, was born in Hawkins (now Hamblen) County, October 12, 1833, the son of Hugh and Lucy (Holston) Cain. The father was born in Grainger (now Hamblen) County in 1801, and was the son of Hugh Cain, Sr., who was a native of Ireland. The grandfather immigrated to America soon after the Revolution, and located in East Tennessee, where he was one of the pioneers of Grainger County. He was a conscientious, high-minded man, and was noted for the exactness with which he meted out justice to all. The father was reared a farmer, securing only a limited education at the old field schools. He worked with his father until 1825, when h6 married and began for himself. He was industrious, thrifty and successful, acquiring large landed possessions, among the largest in Hawkins County. He was prominent, popular and highly respected. He was killed April 27, 1864, by a neighbor’s boy, who was a Federal soldier, notwithstanding that the father was a strong Union man, though too old to serve in the ranks. The mother was born in the same neighborhood as her husband, in 1811, the daughter of William and Lucy Holston, Virginians, who were early residents of East Tennessee. She was a worthy, religious woman, and died in December, 1852. Both parents were Methodists. Our subject passed his youth upon the farm, attending the common schools. In his eighteenth year he entered the high school at Strawberry Plains, where he secured a good practical education. He then entered a store at Rogersville, as clerk,, where he spent three years, and then engaged in merchandising at Russellville. He remained there eight years, and then, in 1863, removed to his present farm, on “Chucky” River, In 1878 he began merchandising at Riverton, Miss., and in 1885 engaged in the same business at Pine Bluff, Ark. These stores he now conducts, having a stock of about $10,000, and an annual business of about $30,000. His home, however, is in Greene County, where he carries on farming extensively, owning one of the best farms in East Tennessee, consisting of 325 acres. During the season, of 1887 he had 150 acres in wheat, fifty acres in corn, and large fields in oats and grass. He is a progressive farmer, having all the latest improvements in farming implements and appliances. He has a large and commodious residence, with tasty surroundings, and is host of one of the most hospitable homes in the State. He is liberal, high-minded., progressive, and an ardent friend of schools and churches. His personal honor is above reproach. He was married in 1855 to Mary Burem, daughter of A. L. Burem, a prominent citizen of Hawkins County, a lawyer and farmer. The one child of this union died in infancy. His wife died in 1856, and November 7, 1860, he married Eliza Neilson, who was born in Greene County May 4, 1842, the daughter of Col. William D. Neilson. Her father was born in Fauquier County, Va., in 1786, and immigrated to Tennessee at a very early date. He served in the navy in 1812, as captain, and was one of the early prominent men of Greene County. He died in May, 1864, after a long and useful life. To our subject’s second union eight children have been born, of whom four are deceased. Our subject and wife are Methodists.

       Rev. Samuel A. Coile, pastor of the Greeneville Presbyterian Church, was born near Dandridge, Tenn., January 18, 1857, the son of John L. Coile, whose history appears in the sketch of J. J. Coile, of Jefferson County. His boyhood was spent in labor on the farm during the summer, and in attendance at the public schools during the winter. At the age of seventeen he entered Maryville College, but afterward changed to Tusculum, College, where he graduated in 1879 with the first honors of his class. He was at once elected principal of the Mount Horeb High School. After one year of successful work in this school, he entered Lane Theological Seminary, Cincinnati, O., from which he graduated in 1883. He immediately entered upon his duties as pastor of the Greeneville Presbyterian Church. In 1884 the board of trustees of Tusculum College elected him professor of ancient languages, and in 1885 vice-president of the institution. He holds this position in connection with his pastorate at the present time. He is profound as a scholar, successful as an instructor, eloquent and forcible as a pulpit orator. On the 30th of June, 1887, he was married to Miss Mary C. Speck, of Morristown, Tenn., daughter of T. J. Speck, D. D. S. Mrs. Coile is an accomplished and intelligent woman, a graduate of Martha Washington College, Va., and fully competent to be a helpmeet for her husband in the successful career which seems only begun.

       Maj. R. H. M. Donnelly, a farmer and proprietor of the Donnelly Hotel, at Fullens, was born in Lee County, Va., January 2, 1835, the son of William and Sarah (McQueen). Donnelly, the former a native of North Carolina, and a soldier in the war of 1812. Hedied in Johnson County, Tenn., February 16, 1842, aged fifty-one, where the mother was born in 1801 and died in 1876. Our subject, the fifth of seven children, was educated at Taylorsville, but as his father died when our subject was but seven years old, he worked the farm for his mother until he was of age. He was a carpenter until lie and Capt. R. H. Lutteral raised a company which became Company D, Thirteenth (Federal) Tennessee Cavalry, of which he became first lieutenant, then captain, and was mustered out as major. He was in seventeen battles; was with Gen. Stoneman in both of his raids from Knoxville, first to Virginia in December, 1864; second to North Carolina and Virginia in March and April, 1865. In 1860 he married Eliza J. Allen. They have had eight sons and seven daughters. After the war he moved to Rheatown, Greene County, where he began merchandising in October, 1865, but since September, 1886, he has been a farmer. He is a Methodist and a Royal Arch Mason.

       James O. and William Me. Earnest, brothers, are farmers in the First District, and were born in Greene County April 1, 1813, and May 19, 1822, respectively, and sons of Felix and Sarah (Oliphant) Earnest. The father was born in Newtown, Va., September 19,1762, and died February 16, 1842, in Virginia. The mother was born in Pennsylvania July 16,1784, and died in Tennessee February 10, 1874. The father was a farmer, respected of all. The brothers have farmed together since their boyhood. In 1867 William married Margaret Hunter, and their children were a daughter (deceased), Felix, George, John, James, F. B. and William Me. The mother died in 1883, and in 1885 he married Rhoda Inman. Both brothers are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

       Benjamin F. Earnest, farmer and stock raiser, was born where he now lives on Nollichucky River, Greene County, August 3, 1821, the son of Peter and Ruth (Fain) Earliest. The father was born near Guilford Courthouse, N. C., February 27, 1777, and died February 17, 1862. Henry Earnest, the grandfather, came from North Carolina to where our subject now lives, in April, 1777. The mother was born in Washington County, January 23, 1784, and died July 23, 1853. Of her five sons and seven daughters two of the latter and one of the former still live. Our subject was reared on the farm and educated at the, Tusculum College, and when his father died took charge of the farm, and has so continued ever since, also engaged in milling. He has been successful in both. In December, 1868, he married Mary M. Rhea, of Blountville, Sullivan County. Samuel R., Nicholas P. and Ellen L. are their only children. He is a Master Mason, and a man who has preferred private life.

       F. M. Easterly, farmer and stock raiser, was born near where he now lives in Greene County, August 24, 1820, the son of Abraham and Anna (Parrott) Easterly. The next ancestors are Jacob and Mary (Bible) Easterly, and the next, George, a native of Virginia. who came to Greene County about 1812 and bought about 200 acres of Joseph and Jesse Bird, early settlers of the region. This land has continued in the family. They are of German origin. The father, a native of Greene County, died June 7, 1828, and the mother, a native of Cocke County, was the daughter of George Parrott. Her children are Frank M., Caroline, Narcissa, Sarah, Isaac and Mary A. Our subject was reared on his present farm and educated in the log schoolhouse. He was left at an early age with the care of a mother and five other children, for whom be cared, as the oldest of them, and in 1843 he married Narcissa, a daughter of Joseph Powell. Their children were Newton Y., Sarah E., Catherine A., George D., Robert F., M. Samuel (deceased); John B., Margaret, Mary E. and Narcissa I. His wife died in 1865, and in 1866 lie married Mrs. Matilda A. Patty (nee Robeson), a native of North Carolina. Their children are Harriet, Alexander, Eleura, Frank P., Jessie L. and Lelia. Our subject has been steward of the Methodist Episcopal Church South for thirty years, and has been treasurer of the Masonic Lodge. He gave $500 to the Oven Creek Church, and liberal sums to various other public enterprises.

       Dr. J. P. Easterly was born in Greene County, May 6, 1839, the son of Jacob and Margaret (Whittenburg) Easterly, both natives of Greene County, the former a farmer, born in 1802, and deceased in June, 1883. Jacob, Sr., the next ancestor, a Virginian, wasa pioneer of Cocke County. The mother was born in 1803 and died in 1854, the daughter of William Whittenburg, of Greene County. Our subject was educated in Emory and Henry College, Virginia, and in 1864 began reading medicine under Dr. B. F. Bell, now of Cocke County. He began practice in 1866 in the county, and has continued eminently successful. He is an extensive farmer also, owning and cultivating 750 acres. May 24, 1866, Louise V., a daughter of David DeVault, of Greene County, became his wife. She was born April 10, 1844, in Greene County. Four of their six children are living. She died February 2. 1887, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which our subject is a local minister.

       Rev. J. B. Fitzgerald was born in Iredell County, N. C., September 26, 1826, and is the son of Samuel and Sarah (Starr) Fitzgerald. The father was a native of Maryland, and was a merchant and farmer. The mother was, also, a native of Maryland, and was the mother of three sons and two daughters. Our subject is the second child, and was reared in Waynesville, N. C., where he was educated in the Greenhill Academy. He is a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, by profession, and a farmer by occupation. He is now living at Fullens’, Greene County, and owns and cultivates a well improved farm of 200 acres. In 1845, he was united in marriage with Harriet M. Grahl, and unto the union have been born ten children, one of whom is dead. Our subject is a self-made man, a zealous Christian, a Master Mason, and a well respected citizen.

       A. J. Frazier, of Frazier & Mercer, liverymen, was born in Greene County, March 21, 1840, the son of Abner and Jane (Dinwiddie) Frazier, the former a native of Greene County, the son of Abner, Sr., a pioneer of the same, and a soldier of 1812. The mother, a daughter of James Dinwiddie, was a devoted Christian. Our subject was educated at Clear Springs Academy, and then up to the war, excepting a year in Knox County, he was a Greene County farmer. The night of March 16, 1863, he escaped to Louisville, Ky., and joined Company E, Fourth Tennessee Infantry, United States Volunteers, and was sergeant, major, and second and first lieutenant, successively. He was captured in 1863, and paroled at once, and served through the war, being mustered out at Nashville, in August, 1865. He was a merchant and then a farmer, until 1878, when he became sheriff of Greene County, and was twice re-elected. He has since been farming, and in the livery business. In 1861, Catherine Weems became his wife. She was born in December, 1839; they have five children. She is the daughter of R. B. Weems.

       G. L. Gammon, a merchant at Caney Branch, Greene Co., Tenn., was born in Sullivan County, Tenn., September 30, 1853. and is the son of Alooney and Sarah A. (Pence) Gammon. The father was a native of Sullivan County, Tenn., born in 1806, and died in 1876, and was a son of Richard Gammon, Sr., who was a native of England, and was a pioneer settler of East Tennessee. The mother of our subject was also a native of Sullivan County, Tenn., and was the daughter of Col. David Pence, a native of Virginia. She was the mother of seven children-two sons and five daughters-of which family our subject is the eldest but one. He was reared on the farm and received a limited education in the country schools; he worked on the farm till 1870, and then began work on the farm of Enoch K. Bachman, of Sullivan County. He next worked at carpentry, and still later clerked for parties of Sullivan County. In 1883 he began traveling for Spencer & Brown, of Greeneville, Tenn. In 1887 he formed a partnership with R. G. Gammon, and began merchandising at Caney Branch, Greene Co., Tenn. He is a practical business man, and is young and energetic.

       R. G. Gammon, a merchant at Caney Branch, Greene Co., Tenn,, was born in Sullivan County, February 14, 1856, and is the son of Abram L. and Sarah A. (Gammon) Gammon. His father’s father was Hon. Abram L. Gammon, and was a farmer and merchant by vocation. Our subject was reared on the farm, and received a limited education in the country schools. He farmed early in life, and clerked for a while at Cedar Creek, Greene County, and in 1878, formed a partnership with George Gammon, and went to merchandising at Caney Branch. In 1880, he became sole proprietor of the establishment, and afterward conducted a good business for six years. In 1887 he formed a partnership with G. L. Gammon, and the firm is now carrying on general merchandising at Caney Branch. Our subject is a self-made man, universally respected, and is postmaster at Caney Branch.

       William Girdner, M. D., was born at Flag Branch, Greene County, September 18,1.808, the son of Conrad and Eva (George) Girdner, the former born in Northhampton County, Penn., February 20,1787. The father was of German origin, the son of Michael and Huldah (Beach) Girdner. Conrad was two years old when they set out with two horses and a wagon for the wilds of Tennessee, in February, 1792, on a seven weeks’ journey. Conrad, went to school to Charles O’Neal, an Irishman, who was teaching during one of the Indian wars. In 1807 he loft home and married Elizabeth, a daughter of Yost George, who spent the first four years of his life in Germany. Conrad then settled on the land given him by his father. His grandfather David and his wife, the latter driving, came to, Greene County with a team of horses; he died on Richland Creek, and Conrad died at his home May 11,1882. Our subject, Catherine, John, Delilah, Luther, Eliza, Mary J., Stephen, Alexander, Nancy and Sally are Conrad’s children. William graduated from Greeneville College when about twenty-two, and began studying medicine under Dr. Broyles. He began practice May 1, 1837, at Cedar Creek, Greene County, and has scored over a half century of success. September 24, 1839, he married Mary A., a daughter of John Link. Their children are Robbley, Douglason, Laura, Ione, Emma, William H: and John H. She died September 14, 1871, and June 24,1884, M. J. Cavener, nee Leming, became his wife. Our subject earned his education himself. He has been a Lutheran for about sixty years.

       J. K. P. Hall, clerk and master of chancery, and claim agent, was born in Greene County, May 9, 1840, the son of David F. and Lydia (Robertson) Hall, the former born in the same county in 1808, the son of William Hall, of Virginia, a pioneer of the county. David was a magistrate for about eighteen years, and died July 6,1872, a Quaker in religion. The mother was born in 1805, the daughter of John Robertson, a farmer of Greene County. She withdrew from the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and joined the Baptist. Our subject attended school at Fall Branch, and August 11, 1862, enlisted in Company B, Fourth Federal Tennessee Cavalry, and became first lieutenant in December following. He was mustered out at Nashville, July 12, 1865. He then farmed and prosecuted claims against the government, and in 1881 became deputy United States revenue collector, Second District, but in 1885 he again engaged in the claim agency, and in November, 1886, was made clerk and master of chancery. He is a member of the G. A. R., at Jonesboro, and of Johnson Masonic Lodge, at Fall Branch, and of Jonesboro 1. 0. 0. F. Lodge, and K. of H. at Jonesboro. September 4, 1866, he married Martha J., a daughter of William Hall, a native of Greene County. They have five children. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

       John Hardin, merchant and stock dealer, was born north of Greeneville, October 4, 1839, the son of Cornelius and Annie (Cox) Hardin, the former born in 1809; John was the name of the next two direct ancestors. The great-grandfather was killed in a charge against the Indians near the site of Chattanooga. He was a captain, and made the charge against his own judgment, knowing it was certain death. His dying message to his wife was that their unborn child might be given his name, and that boy became one of the pioneers of Greene County, and served in the war of 1812. He died, in 1845, a prominent man. The father, a farmer and stock dealer, died August 18, 1873, esteemed by all. The mother, a daughter of Eliacom Cox, a native and leading citizen of Greene County, was born in 1813, north of Greeneville, near where she now lives. She is a Methodist. Our subject was educated at Greeneville Academy, and farmed until April, 1863, when he enlisted in Company A, Fourth Tennessee Federal Infantry. In the fall he was captured at McMinnville, but was paroled at once. He joined his command at Knoxville, and served until August 18,1865. He has since been farming and stock dealing with success. The firm of Trim & Hardin, merchants, began in 1887. July 4, 1861, he married Malinda, a daughter of John Kidwell, and born near Greeneville in 1841. Their children were Robert A., born May 17, 1862; Charles, born July 17, 1866; Cornelius, born October 14, 1871; John K., born October 6, 1875, and Lillian, born January 23, 1883, deceased November 3, 1886. He and his wife are Methodists.

       Landon C. Haynes was born in Greene County, Tenn., February 27, 1857, the son of James G. and Sarah E. (Campbell) Haynes. The father was a native of Tennessee, born July 23, 1832, and died July 4. 1873. He was the son of Joseph Haynes, a native of Tennessee, and of German descent. Our subject’s father was a carpenter by trade, and was universally respected by all who knew him. The mother was also a native of Tennessee, was born July 15, 1834, and is the mother of three children, viz.: Joseph C., Landon C. and Cicero. Landon C. was reared in the country until eight years of age, and afterward in Greeneville. He was educated in the Tusculum College, from which institution he graduated in 1877, and in the same year he became tutor of ancient languages in the college, and later, in 1881, became professor of mathematics. In 1882 he married Jennie C. Brown, a daughter of Col. John Brown, of Greene County. Two sons have blessed their marriage. Our subject is a self-made man. When he had finished one year’s work in college his father died, and our subject was left with no means to complete his education; but he applied himself closely, and by energy and hard toil earned enough to defray the expenses to complete his collegiate education. He is a young man, and is very proficient in his profession. He is a sober and industrious man, a member of the Presbyterian Church and is universally respected by all who know him.

       J. J. Howell, M. D., the subject of this sketch, is a practicing physician at Rheatown, Greene Co., Tenn., and was born in Wilkes County, N. C., June 18, 1849. He is the son of S. S. and Elizabeth (Ferguson) Howell. The father was a native of North Carolina, and was of English descent, and was a farmer; he died November 11, 1880, at the age of seventv-two. He was a man of tact, social and religious, and was a well respected citizen. The mother is a native of Wilkes County, N. C., and daughter of John B. Ferguson, of North Carolina. She is the mother of five children-three sons and two daughters-all but one sister lives. The mother stilt lives in her native county. Our subject was reared on a farm, and educated in the Greeneville and Tusculum Colleges. He began the study of medicine in 1874, and began practicing in Greene County, Tenn., in March, 1876. He graduated from the Vanderbilt University, at Nashville, in March, 1884, when he returned to Rheatown, and resumed a successful practice. He is a self-made man. He had no advantage of money to educate himself, but by his own energy and perseverance earned enough to defray the expenses of an education. His work for securing money was selling books, and working in the harvest field. In 1876, he was united in marriage with Sarah R. Leming, daughter of John Leming. To this marriage are born five children-three daughters and two sons: Flora, Rowland, Minnie, Wayland and Macie. Our subject is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, is a Master Mason, and very temperate.

       J. M. Hunter, a farmer and stock dealer in the Seventh District, was born in 1834 in Greene County, where he has since resided, and where be permanently located, having traveled ,quite extensively over the United States. He began life for himself, a poor man, and what he is now worth is the fruit of his own industry and good management. He owns a fine farm, where he now resides, of 3171 acres, another of 231, and another of seventy-five acres. He has given his attention principally to stock dealing, at which he has been very successful. He was married in 1868 to R. C. Allen, a daughter of Samuel Allen, a native of Greene County. Three children blessed this union: William (deceased), Rebecca (deceased) and Charles Washington. Mrs. Hunter was killed February 14, 1884, by parties evidently desiring to kill and rob Mr. Hunter. Mr. Hunter was married September 15, 1885, to Miss N. S. Hawkins, a daughter of Dr. Joseph Hawkins, a native of Greene County, a very successful medical practitioner, and who was very popular. Mrs. Hunter was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and Mr. Hunter is a Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential ticket for James Buchanan. He is a Master Mason, and a member of the 1. 0. 0. F. Lodge. He is the fifth of eight children -two sons and six daughters-of John and Lettie (Self) Hunter, natives of Greene County. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was a very successful farmer and stock dealer. Mr. Hunter was a son of Samuel Hunter, a native of Ireland, immigrated to America, settling first in Washington County, Va., and afterward moved to Greene County, Tenn., being one of the earliest settlers of the last named county. He was a farmer by occupation. He had eight children-three daughters and five sons: Thomas, John and Samuel lived and died in Tennessee, William and James moved to Missouri, where they died unmarried. Thomas Hunter’s children moved to Missouri, excepting Frederick, who moved to Indiana.

       M. F. Jerolds, M. D., was born June 8, 1823, in Kentucky. He received an academical education and began medicine when but eighteen, under Dr. I. N. Hodgin, and attended medical lectures at Louisville Medical College. He began practice in 1845 at James Cross Roads, Washington County, and has had an extensive practice ever since. He was a surgeon in the Second Tennessee Cavalry, United States Army, from 1862 to 1865. In December, 1845, Lucinda, a daughter of Jeremiah Wells, a native-of Sullivan County, became his wife. The children were Alice, Henrietta (deceased) and William (deceased). She died in September, 1854, and in December, 1855, he married Nancy A., a daughter of Benjamin Blackburn, native of Washington County, Tenn. Their children were Oliver (deceased), John C., Frank M. (deceased) and Fannie H. He and his wife are Presbyterians, but his first wife was a Methodist. He is a Republican, and in 1877-78 represented his county in the Legislature. He has been a Mason for about thirty-eight years. He is the second of six children of Jesse and Nancy A. (Quinby) Jerolds, natives of Washington and Sullivan Counties, respectively. He was a farmer, the son of George Jerolds of Ireland, who was one of the leading pioneer farmers of Washington County.

       A. S. Johnson, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Greene County, December 21, 1827, on Cedar Branch, near Old Stone Dam Camp Grounds. He is the son of Thomas and Mabala (Gfellers) Johnson, the former, a farmer and dealer in stock, born near the foot of McCartner Mountain in 1804, and died in 1870. The mother was born in Greene County, on the banks of the Nollichucky River in 1805. She still lives- in this county. Of three sons and five daughters one of the latter and two of the former are deceased. Our subject was reared on the farm, and attended country schools. He has been successfully engaged in farming and stock-dealing all his life. In October, 1850, he married Matilda A., a daughter of Benjamin Gray, of Greene County. Their two sons and three daughters are all married. Our subject is a Master and Royal Arch Mason. He now owns 350 acres of finely improved land, and 8,000 acres of mountainous land, on which at a height of 6,000 feet is the well-known summer resort, Cold Spring.

       Robert M. Jones was born in Jefferson (now Hamblen) County October 28, 1847, and is the son of Thomas M. and Lavenia A. (McFarland) Jones. The father was born near the present Hamblen County line, in Cocke County, Tenn., in 1816, and was the son of Daniel Jones, who was a native of Virginia, who immigrated to Cocke County, Tenn., at a very early date in the history of the State, entering land in that county and becoming one of the pioneers of that county. He served in the war of 1812, and was a prominent citizen of that locality. Thomas M., the father, is a farmer by vocation, and removed to Jefferson County in about 1845. He followed farming in Hamblen County for a number of years, and then removed to Cocke County. He moved from one place to another until 1884, and then took up his home with his son, our subject. The mother-was born at Spring Vale, Jefferson Co., Tenn., and was the daughter of Robert McFarland, who was born on the same farm as his daughter (and was the son of Robert McFarland) who was a native of Scotland, and one of the first settlers of Jefferson County, and was the first sheriff of that county. She was a sister to Robert McFarland, who served as supreme judge of Tennessee. She died April 17, 1850. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Our subject was reared on the farm until his seventeenth year, and attended school in the public schools of the neighborhood and at Greeneville, where he secured a practical education. At the age of seventeen years he began railroading, beginning as a brakeman and working his way to fireman, then engineer and conductor, and was the first conductor on the Morristown road (western North Carolina branch of the East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railway-Buncombe). He quit railroading in April, 1873, and engaged in merchandising the following year at Warrensburg, Greene County, where he remained for two and a half years, and then engaged in farming at his present farm, and has continued up to the present, making a success of the same. He is a public-spirited man, and always encourages worthy public enterprises, and takes an interest in the schools and churches. He is energetic and enterprising, and is universally esteemed and respected by his neighbors. He was married, June 23, 1874, to Ellen Bible, who was born April 9, 1856, and was the daughter of David and Diana (Foubion) Bible, both of whom are natives of Tennessee. To this union two children were born, both of whom are living. The wife died August 17, 1879, and December 28, 1882, he was united to Jennie Crosby, who was born in Lick Creek, near Midway, Greene Co., Tenn., October 3, 1852, and is the daughter of Lemuel Crosby, one of the leading citizens of the Fourth District of Greene County. She is a member of the Baptist Church.

       George E. Kenney, a farmer in the Eleventh District, was born in August, 1834, in Greene County, where he has since resided. He began life for himself when twenty-two years old in only moderate circumstances, and the most of what he is now worth is the fruit of his own industry and good management. He owns a good farm of about 250 acres. He was married, in 1856. to Miss Mary Weems, a daughter of William Weems, a native of Greene County, Tenn. Two children blessed this union: John C. Breckinridge (deceased) and Wilbur C. Mrs. Kenney died in February, 1865. He was married a second time, in January, 1866, to Miss Louisa Brown, a daughter of Rev. Alexander Brown, a native of Greene County, Tenn. One child blessed the last union-Laura (deceased). Mr. Kenney is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is a Democrat in politics. He cast his first presidential ticket for James Buchanan. He was elected justice of the peace in 1860, and has been re-elected at each election since excepting one, when he was not a candidate. He has given universal satisfaction in the discharge of the duties of his office, none of his decisions ever being reversed. He was the eldest of twelve children of James and Elizabeth (Weems) Kenney, natives of Greene County, Tenn. The father was a very successful farmer all his life, and took quite an active interest and part in religious affairs. He died about 1859, aged about fifty-eight years. Mrs. Kenney died in 1882, aged sixty-six years. Mr. and Mrs. Kenney were of Irish and English descent respectively. Mrs. Elizabeth Kenney was a daughter of James and Hannah Weems, natives of Greene County, Tenn., and of Virginia respectively. Mr. James Kenney’s father was of Irish descent, and was a weaver by trade.

       Rufus J. Kidwell, was born four miles north of Greeneville on the waters of Roaring Fork of Lick Creek, Greene County, on April 2, 1825, and is the son of Elijah and Polly (Hankins) Kidwell. The father was born in Greene County in 1802 and was the son of Joshua Kidwell, who was born in the valley of Virginia, and was the son of a native of Wales, England. Joshua, the grandfather, came to Tennessee in about 1787, and settled in Greene County, of which be was one of the pioneers; coming when there were but few white men here and the country was overrun with Indians. He and a brother were engaged in the Indian campaigns, and the latter was killed in the assault upon the Indians at Lookout Mountain. Elijah, the father, was a farmer and carpenter and carried on the two vocations jointly, making a success of both. He was an industrious and energetic man; though well known and highly esteemed, he never entered public life nor ever held a county office, being of a retiring disposition, and never asking for office. While at work erecting the residence in which H. D. Maloney now resides on Chucky River, he contracted a fever from which he died on August 28, 1842. The mother was born in New Jersery in 1798, and was the daughter of William Hankins, who was a native Scotland. He immigrated to Tennessee at the close of the Revolutionary war, and settled Greene County on Roaring Fork of Lick Creek. She was a pious Christian lady, and died in l862. She was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. A peculiarity of the grandparents of our subject was, that each lived and died on their original farms end the same are in the possession of their children. Our subject was raised on the farm, and attended school at the common schools of the county, and finished his education at a private subscription school taught by Thomas B. Jarnagin, of Jefferson County, who was educated at Tusculum College. At the age of nineteen years his health failed him, and he learned the saddler’s trade under Joshua C. Lane of Greenville, serving an apprenticeship three years. After learning the trade he located at Springvale, near the bend of Chucky, Jefferson (now Hamblen) County, and engaged in tanning and manufacturing leather into saddles, boots, shoes, etc. In November, 1856, he removed to Russellville, and engaged in merchandising, and sold goods over two years, and then opened a large tannery on the Barton farm, about half -way between Russellville and Morristown, and conducted that establishment during the progress of the late war. He is a sympathizer of the Federal Government, but did not enlist in the war. He gave freely of his goods to the poor of both sides, refusing in no instance to respond to the calls of the people for leather. At the close of the war he removed to Morristown, and in connection with D. Morris and others in merchandising, tanning and manufacturing leather, remained at that place until August, 1875. He then removed to Rogersville, Tenn., and for four years was connected with the Rogersville Female Institute, and educated his daughters at that school. He then located on a farm, nearly two and one-half miles west of Rogersville, followed farming until 1882, and then removed to Warrensburg, engaged in merchandising, an d has continued up to the present, meeting with much success. He carries a general stock of merchandise of about $4,000, and does about $12,000 of business annually. He was united in marriage at Springvale, Tenn., on October 2.8, 1851, to Emma McFarland, who was born at the above place, July 1, 1830, and is the daughter of Col. Robert McFarland, a son of Robert McFarland, Sr., and a sister of Robert McFarland, who was one of the supreme judges of Tennessee. To this union eight children have been born, all of whom are living and grown. Robert G., the oldest son, is railroading in Texas, with headquarters at Fort Worth, and Charles E, is engaged with his father in merchandising. Florence, the eldest daughter, is the wife of W. J. McSween, a lawyer of Newport, Cocke County, Tenn., and the other daughters are at home. Both our subject and wife and all his children are members of the Presbyterian Church.

       Samuel W. Leming, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Greene County, August 7, 1840 the son of John and Rhenemah (Henshaw) Leming, the former a native of Cocke County, born December 20, 1798, died in this county November 17, 1855. He was a millwright about eighteen years, and among the first of his trade in East Tennessee, and also engaged in farming. Samuel, a native of North Carolina, was the next ancestor, and came to East Tennessee at an early date, being one of the pioneers of East Tennessee. He was in the Indian wars and the war of 1812, the scabbard knife he used in that war being in the possession of our subject, along with two conch-shells used by his grandparents. The mother, a daughter of Washington Henshaw, was born in this county September 15, 1810, and died April 22, 1882. Her father came from Rockingham County, Va., to this county in 1799, and erected the first mill of any importance in Greene County, and was active in the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject, the eldest of eight children, was reared on the farm, and educated at Tusculum College, which the war caused him to, abandon for the Confederate Army, Company L, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry. He was at Chickamauga and Murfreesboro, and surrendered with Gen. J. E. Johnston. After a trip West he settled on his present farm in Greene County. In 1878 he married Martha Mc. Alexander. Their children are Frank E., J. Gertrude, Bessie C., Mary P., Susan E., Cora, A. and Thomas D. He and his wife are Methodists. He has been president and treasurer of the county agricultural association, and is now on the executive committee. He is a trustee of Tusculum College, and one of the committee who built the present building. He has also been a steward in his church for eighteen years.

       James Love, our subject, is one of the prosperous farmers of Greene County, and was born about three miles north of his present home in the Third Civil District, on June 20, 1824. He is the son of Charles and Hannah (Evans) Love. The father was a native of Greene County, Tenn., and was of English extraction, and was a farmer. The mother also was a native of Greene County, and was the mother of fourteen children-ten sons and four daughters. Our subject is the fourth, and was reared on the farm, and educated in the country schools. He has farmed successfully all his life. He had a very limited capital to begin the occupation with, and has been very energetic, and by hard toil has been successful in his calling. He owns and cultivates a farm of 317 acres, situated on the Nollichucky River, and also owns two other farms; one of 250 acres, in the Fifth District, and 142 acres in the Fourth Civil District. His land is good, and he has it moderately improved. Some very good timber is on the land, and all is pretty well situated. On June 12, 1873, he was united in marriage with Sarah A. Rader, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Ottinger) Rader. Unto the marriage have been born seven children-two sons and five daughters-one daughter is dead-viz.: Birtle Elizabeth, born December 12, 1874; ,Charles Edgar, born June 3, 1876; Sarah Jane, born August 19,1877; John Anderson, born March 19, 1879; Eliza Emaline, born March 2, 1881, and Lulie Susanna, born November 16, 1883.

       James Luster, a wagon-maker and farmer in the Twenty-first District, was born April 18, 1826, in Greene County, where he has since resided. He began life for himself when about twenty-two years old, a poor man, and what he is now worth is the fruit of his own industry and economy. He learned the wagon-maker’s trade at that age, which he followed in connection with farming. He owns a fine farm of 800 acres where he resides. He enlisted in the spring of 1863 in Company A, Fourth Tennessee Infantry of the Federal Army, and was mustered out of service in 1865 at Nashville, Tenn. He was corporal of his company. He was married in September, 1850, to Miss Lorinda O. Harmon, a daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Bowman) Harmon, natives of Greene County. Mr. P. Harmon was a soldier under Capt. “Bob” Maloney in the war of 1812. Mr. and Mrs. Harmon , were of Dutch descent. To Mr. and Mrs. Luster eight children have been born: Elizabeth, Peter, Catherine, Elender (dead), Nancy, Mary J., William A. (dead) and Eliza A. Mrs. Luster is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Luster is a Democrat in politics. He has served as school commissioner and road overseer for some time. He was the second of nine children of William and Catherine (Young) Luster, early settlers of East Tennessee. Mr. Luster had four children by his first wife. He followed teaming and blacksmithing.

       J. B. R. Lyon, the subject of the following sketch, is a printer by vocation; was born at Cheraw, S. C., April 16, 1825, and is the son of Mason R. and Margaret Ann (King) Lyon. The father was born at Fair Haven, Vt., November 12, 1798; was a printer by vocation, and was the son of James and Phila (Risley) Lyon. James was born in Vermont, April 15, 1775, he was also a printer by vocation. and was the son of Col. Mathew Lyon, a native of Ireland. Col. Mathew Lyon was a member of Congress from Vermont when the alien law was passed, and later had occasion to speak in opposition to the President of the United States. This was a violation of the alien law, because the Colonel was a foreign born citizen, and he was imprisoned, but afterward paid his fines and was released. In 1799, together with a colony of New Englanders Vermont, he immigrated to Kentucky, and settled on the Cumberland River, about twenty-five miles above the mouth of the river, in what is now called the county of Lyon, which county he afterward represented in the Kentucky Legislature, and afterward was appointed agent to the Chickasaw Indians in Arkansas. The mother of our subject was born in North Carolina, March 24,1803, and is of the King family, to which belongs Hon. William R. King, of Alabama. She is the mother of twelve children, of which our subject is the eldest, but one. He was educated at Elizabeth, Carter Co., Tenn. and has devoted his life to printing, and at present is proprietor and editor of the Greeneville Republican. In 1851 he married Martha M. Britton, daughter of James Britton, and to this marriage have been born David K., James B., Charles M., John M., George B., Samuel, Mollie, Maggie and Willie.

       James B. Lyon, editor of the Greeneville Democrat, and one of the leading young citizens of Greeneville, was born in Greene County, Tenn., March 10, 1856, and is the son of J. B. R. Lyon, a sketch of whom appears above. When but seven years of age, the subject of this sketch entered his father’s office to learn the printer’s trade, even before he had learned the alphabet, and strange as it may appear, the young printer was able to set up as much as a column of type before he knew one letter of the alphabet from another. After working in the printing office for nine years, he, at the age of sixteen years, entered Tusculum College, in Greene County and attended that institution for three years. He next removed to Knoxville, and for about nine months worked with daily papers of that city, and then located at Newport, Cocke County, and got out the first three issues of the Newport Sentinel. After being connected with the Whitesburg Times, he, on May 1, 1879, established the Greeneville Democrat, and has continued the publication of that paper with success up to the present, it having now over 1,900 subscribers weekly. When established the paper had only five columns. After eighteen months had elapsed the prosperity necessitated an enlargement, and an additional column was attached, and thirteen months later another column was added, making it now seven columns, all home print. Our subject was married October 61 1875, to Tennie Dobson, who was born in Greene County, Tenn., August 12, 1857, and is the daughter of Rev. J. B. Dobson, D. D., one of the oldest and most noted ministers of East Tennessee. To this union four boys have been born, the eldest of whom is deceased.


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