Bedford County,
Tennessee

Civil War Resources

Bedford County Confederate Pension Applications Index

Tennessee Confederate Soldiers' Home Applications Index

Obtaining Confederate Pension records by mail from the Tennessee State Library and Archives

Search The Civil War in Tennessee

"The Tullahoma Campaign:  Operational Insights" by Richard J. Brewer. (a PDF file)

Bedford County Confederate Veterans filling out the Tennessee Civil War Veterans Questionnaire

Name
Company
Regiment

Adams, Samuel J.

B

4th TN Cav.

Alexander, McKager C.

Not stated

45th TN

Beard, William D.

B

53rd TN

Brown, Ridley S.

F

17th TN

Carrick, Thomas F.

H

21st TN

Chapman, C.S.

Not stated

32nd TN

Coop, James H.

Not stated

18th TN

Cooper, Goldman G.

F

51st TN

Curtis, John W.

Not stated

4th TN

Dillard, Francis M.

Not stated

23rd TN

Driver, Tomas N.

Not stated

6th TN

Fonvielle, William B.

E

41st TN

Friddle, Alfred

Not stated

41st TN

Gregory, John T.

Not stated

41st TN

Grubb, B. Alphard

H

33rd TN

Harris, John Dennis

Not stated

41st TN Vol.

Hastings, Joe H.

A

17th TN

Hatchett, Thomas

D

2nd TN

Hight, William G.

Not stated

Not stated-

Hoover, Baxter R.

E

4th TN Cav.

Jones, James Yell

I

23rd TN

Landers, Flavius S.

Not stated

23rd TN

Little, Thomas C.

A

Forrest's Cav.

Lloyd, James K.P.

Not stated

17th TN

Montgomery, Elias G.

Not stated

Forrest's Escort

Moore,William B.

F

23rd TN

Mosley, James A.

Not stated

23rd TN

Mullins, William V.

Not stated

23rd TN

Nelson, John Thompson

Not stated

8th TX Inf.

Philpot, William Allen

E

23rd TN Inf.

Prince, James Pinkney

Not stated

Newman's Bat.

Sehorn, William Marion

Not stated

34th AL

Sutherlin, Marcus H.

D

1st AL Cav.

Thompson, Zack

Not stated

7th TN Inf.

Victory, Isaac

A

4th TN Cav.

Winn, Luther L.

Not stated

Forrest's Reg.

Wood, Thomas W.

Not stated

18th TN

For information on how to obtain a copy of the above questionnaires, please click here.


Bedford County and the Civil War

Bedford County was divided on the great questions which led to the late civil war, and when the election was held June 8, 1861 to vote for or against separation from the Union and representation in a Confederate Congress, the county voted in the negative by a majority of nearly 200. When the time came for action the county furnished almost as many soldiers to the Northern as to the Southern army. Indeed, so loyal was Shelbyville to the Union as to earn for the town the name of "Little Boston," and being on the line of march of both armies, witnessed many movements and counter-movements of large bodies of troops, and though much damage was sustained to property and not a few lives lost, yet through the influence of prominent citizens on both sides the consequences were no more serious than could have been expected in time of war.

In September, 1861, the "Shelbyville Rebels," the first Confederate company raised in the county, was organized by the election of A. S. Boon as captain. Immediately following this company, Confederate companies were organized as follows, all of which were mustered into the Forty-first Regiment of Tennessee Infantry: Scudder Rifles, Capt. W. C. Blanton, organized in the vicinity of Unionville; Erwin Guards, Capt. M. Payne, organized at Wartrace; Richmond Guards, Capt. Brown, organized in the vicinity of Richmond; a Flat Creek company, under Capt. Keith, and Capt. J. F. Neil's Bell Buckle company, also about half of Capt. Thomas Miller's company, which went from Marshall County, was made up from Bedford County by those living near the county line.

During the same year a company was organized at Bell Buckle, and James Dennison elected captain, which joined the Second Regiment of Tennessee Infantry. During the summer of 1861 three companies were organized in the county, and joined the Seventeenth Regiment of Tennessee Infantry. (More info on the Seventeenth may be found here.)They were as follows: a Flat Creek company, Capt. J. D. Hoyl; a Fairfield company, Capt. James L. Armstrong, and Capt. W. A. Landis' company, made up part in Bedford and part in Lincoln County. In 1862 a company of artillery was organized in Shelbyville, of which J. L. Burt was elected captain, and Capt., It. B. Blackwell also took out a company in that year.

In 1862 Capt. Montgomery Little was deputized by Gen. Forrest to raise a company of 100 men to act as an escort to the daring cavalry commander, which company was to be mounted and known as "Forrest's Escorts." Capt. Little proceeded to Shelbyville where, October 6, 1862, he completed the organization of the Escorts. The company was composed of the picked men from Bedford, Rutherford, Lincoln, Marshall and Moore Counties, and were provided with choice arms and the best horses the county afforded. On the above date the escort fell into line in front of the court house, on the south side, in Shelbyville, from which place they took up their line of march to Nashville, and from that time until the close of the war was with Gen. Forrest through all his campaigns.

The Federal troops furnished by Bedford County were as follows: Those who were attached to the Fifth Regiment of Tennessee Mounted Infantry: Capt. R. C. Couch's company, Capt. J. L. Hix's company, Capt. Robert C. Wortham's company and Capt. Rickman's company. Those of the Fourth Tennessee Regiment of Mounted Infantry: Capt. Jaynes Wortham's company and Capt. John W. Phillips's: and Capt. C. B. Word's company, of the Tenth Tennessee Mounted Infantry, known as Johnson's Guards.

Throughout the war Shelbyville was infested with troops at short intervals, first the Confederates and then the Federals having possession. The same troops also visited Wartrace, and at that place entrenchments were thrown up by the Confederates, while the latter also dug a line of rifle pits around Shelbyville, extending from Horse Mountain to Duck River, and on the mountain both armies established signal stations at different times. The first troops to visit Shelbyville was a detachment of Confederates under command of Col. Gordon, during the summer of 1861. During 1862 troops visited the town as follows: Fourth Ohio Cavalry, Gen. Forrest's cavalry, Gen. Mitchell's division, Gen. Lytle's brigade, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Regiment of Infantry, Gen. Wood's division, the First Kentucky Cavalry and Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston's entire army corps, who came here on their retreat from Bowling Green, KY While here Gen. Johnston replenished his commissary department with about 30,000 head of hogs and a large quantity of beef. In April, 1863, Gen. Bragg's army was encamped in Shelbyville for a month or more. After the battle of Murfreesboro in December, Gen. Bragg retreated to Shelbyville, and going into camp remained until January, 1864. During 1864 Gen. Milroy's division, a Missouri regiment of infantry, under command of Col. Fox and the One Hundred and Seventh New York Regiment of Infantry encamped in Shelbyville.

At Wartrace, in April, 1862, the Forty-second Regiment Indiana Infantry, was attacked by Col. Starn's Regiment, when a sharp skirmish took place. In 1863 a lively skirmish occurred between the Fifth Tennessee Cavalry and the Confederate Cavalry under Gen. Wheeler at Wartrace, and in October following, Gen. Wheeler again had a brush with the Federal Cavalry, between 3,000 and 4,000 men being in the fight, two miles west of Shelbyville, in which quite a number were killed and wounded. On the 27th of June, 1863, four companies of the Fifth Tennessee made an attack on the Confederates who were holding Shelbyville. The Federals, commanded by Col. Bob Galbraith, advanced from Guy's Gap, and by the time Shelbyville was reached the Confederates were on the retreat. A running fight occurred on Martin Street, during which several were killed on the Confederate side. The Confederates retreated from the town and crossed Duck River at the Scull Camp bridge, at which point, being so closely pursued, they threw a large brass field-piece from the bridge into the river, and the cannon remains to this day in the mud at the bottom of the river. No lives were lost on the Federal side during the hot engagement.

In May, 1864, twelve soldiers belonging to the Fourth Tennessee Mounted Infantry (Federal), were captured while guarding the Shelbyville depot, which was stored with hay, by Robert B. Blackwell, who was at the head of a company of bushwhackers. The depot and contents were burned, and the twelve soldiers escorted a short distance from town and shot.

The above info was taken from Goodspeed's History of Bedford County.


Edward Jordan Lanham provided the following in case it might be of use to those doing research in Bedford County:

Lt. Erwin P. Jett, 41st TN. Inf. Reg., Co. F., CSA
Born Shelbyville, TN., Date?
Wounded Battle of Atlanta, 7-22-1864
Died Griffin GA. hospital 7-24-1864
Buried Oak Hill Cemetery, Griffin GA. Plot 165
Plot 165 was purchased by the Bank of TN for burial of officers from that state.


Gloria Lange ([email protected]) submitted the following:

John Green Mosely/Mosley, PVT ( listed under both surname spellings on the Confederate Rolls) joined on 18 jun 1862 in Bedford Co. Reported for duty on July 18 1862. Enlisted Aug 18 1862 in Big Springs Va. He was a member of the 8th TN ( Smiths) Cavalry. He was discharged Jan 28 1863 as being over 40 years of age. We have found no further paperwork on him as of 2012 . He was listed on the rolls as present and paid, or due to be paid, until the date specified.  Submitted by Gloria Lange, a descendant.



Martha Smotherman Mendez provided the following information. Questions should be directed to her.

List of Civil War Soldiers Discharge Papers

Recently while I was looking at the Bedford County Deed Books index on micro film from the Tennessee State Library and Archives, I came across an entry in the LLL Book in the index. 

"For End of Soldiers discharge see end of "Direct" Deeds"

To me is is a mystery why the clerk would record in LLL book the civil war discharge entries in the EEE and FFF books. This may remain a mystery.

I attempted to write them down. There maybe discharge papers in other deed books, but I did not find them. I looked at the actual Deed Book EEE, in the Land Deed Office in Bedford County. In some instances it gives the rank, and the unit the soldiers served with. There were over 50 soldiers who listed their discharge. 

Bearden, H.L.W. EEE page 513
Bearden, Wm. E. EEE page 530
Burrow, George W. EEE page 538
Burrow, James R. EEE page 540
Burrow, Nimrod C. EEE page 541
Burrow, Jarry FFF page 2
Bartlett, Daniel FFF page 12
(No name) FFF page 5

Cates, Robert EEE page 505
Couch, John A. EEE page 534
Chandler, Franklin L. EEE page 534
Chambers, David T. EEE page 550
Cannon, Samuel M FFF page 5

Derryberry, John H EEE page 374
Dixon, William B. EEE page 510

Earnhart, Wm A. EEE page 374
Edde, Hiram J. EEE page 392
Farmer, Wiley EEE page 536
Floyd, James W. FFF page 3 - 4

Gordon, Andam E. EEE page 548
Galbreath Jas H. EEE page 555

Holt, H.J. W. EEE page 521
Harman, J.K.P. EEE page 523

Jackson, W.S. EEE page 391 - 392
Jenkins, Daniel M. EEE page 539

King, John A EEE page 509
King, Charles B. EEE page 521
Koonce, W.W. FFF page 3

Lacey, E.M EEE page 527
Lusk, J.M. EEE page 537

Mullins, Mullins EEE page 387 (could be 587)
Murhy, William M. EEE page 526
Maupin, R.C. EEE 537
Mitchell, Levi FFF page 32

Phillips, John P. EEE page 527
Pearson, Geo W. EEE page 544
Pearson, James H. EEE page 545
Pearson, Thomas EE page 546
Patterson, Ready FFF page 50

Reed, James M. EEE page 511
Reed, Benjamin F. FFF page 29

Solomon, James N. EEE page 525
Stone, Marion EEE page 547
Snell, James T. EEE 559
Shofner, T.J. EEE 560
Shofner, Plummer W. FFF page 24
Statum, Samuel W. FFF page 174
Smiley William G. FFF page 174

Williams, Tarlton F. EEE page 395
Wortham, May John EEE page 487
Word, William H. FFF page 38
Welch, Joseph FFF page 73


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